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Alan Greveson's World War 1 Forum (Page 89)

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Posted by: Bella {No contact email}
Location: Esher
Date: Sunday 19th January 2014 at 6:21 PM
Dear Alan,

William Johnson born 2nd September 1874, Horton Kirby, Kent. Parents James and Jane Johnson.

According to the 1901 Census (aged 34) was living in Paddington, London (no profession stated) with two children, Walter J aged 3 and Nora A 4 months, no mother, so should I assume she had died, possibly in childbirth? James's sister was living with them, presumably taking care of.

Trying to establish wife's name, where married and if she did die, when and where.

Can you help?

Will be forever grateful.

With kind regards.

Bella
Reply from: Alan Greveson
Date: Sunday 19th January 2014 at 8:30 PM

Dear Bella,
It's not clear whether you are searching for a James Johnson or a William Johnson. James was recorded in the 1901 census as a widower, aged 32, coachman, with his children Walter J and Nora A.
The children's birth certificates would indicate who the mother was. The birth of Johnson, Nora Ada, was registered at Paddington, County London, in Oct-Dec 1900 Vol 1A page 48.
She was baptised on 3rd February 1901 with parents James and Ada Annie Johnson. James was a coachman. Walter James Johnson was baptised at St Mary-le-Bone on 23rd January 1898.
A James Johnson had married at Marylebone in Oct-Dec 1891 Vol 1A Page 1072. A possible spouse was Ada Annie Teagle. As James Johnson is such a frequently recurring name you would need to see the marriage certificate to verify that. However, the death of an Ada Annie Johnson was recorded at Paddington in Jan-Mar 1901 (Johnson, Ada Annie, age 32, Vol 1A page 39) which might suggest a postpartum death.
The birth of an Ada Annie Teagle was registered at Pancras in 1869. A James Johnson (re-)married to a Flora Kate Davis at Marylebone in Jan-Mar 1903 (Vol 1A Page 834).
With kind regards,
Alan
Reply from: Bella
Date: Sunday 19th January 2014 at 9:15 PM

Dear Alan,

I shall be donating to your Charity for all the help you have given for the last couple of enquiries.

The information you found re James (widower) falls into place.

Thank you so very much.

With kind regards.

Bella

Posted by: Keith {No contact email}
Location: Marlow
Date: Sunday 19th January 2014 at 5:41 PM
I'm looking to find out where my grandfather, Joseph Harrison, served in May 1918.
He was with A company of 2/6 battalion of the South Staffs Regiment, regimental number 30369. His war records show he was on furlough from 20th to 27th April 1918 and then gassed on the 16th May 1918. I'd like to find out where he served after the battalion was disbanded on 9th May and the battlefield at which he got gassed. Many thanks for any help you can provide Keith Harrison
Reply from: Alan Greveson
Date: Sunday 19th January 2014 at 8:30 PM

Dear Keith,
Joseph Harrison was medically discharged from the Army through sickness on 28th June 1918 in the UK. The 2/6th Battalion South Staffordshire Regiment served in France from 25th February 1917. The 2/6th Battalion had served with 176th Infantry Brigade and was reduced to a training cadre on 9th May 1918 and moved to the 66th Division. Men surplus to the training cadre were dispersed to other units. Only Joseph's individual service record would show which unit he was posted to. I have been unable to find a surviving record. The 2/6th Battalion was disbanded on 31st July 1918 with the training cadre men being posted to the 1st/6th Battalion South Staffordshire Regiment.
Joseph's medal index card recorded that he only served with the South Staffordshire Regiment and his War Badge roll showed he was discharged from the South Staffordshire Regiment. So, when his own battalion was wound down in May 1918, he was certainly posted to another battalion of the South Staffordshire Regiment, but that battalion is unidentified.
There was no specific, named, large battle on May 16th 1918 although gas shells would have formed part of the daily round of artillery bombardments. However, "Soldiers Died in the Great War" (HMSO 1921) recorded that out of all the battalions of the South Staffordshire Regiment only six soldiers were killed on May 16th 1918 and they all served with the 1st/6th Battalion. Therefore there is the probability that the 1st/6th Battalion was aggressively or defensively engaged on May 16th, and was certainly more engaged than any other battalion in the South Staffordshire Regiment on that day. The 1st/6th Battalion was near Houchin a few miles south of Bethune. Earlier, on May 12th 1918, the enemy had been reported occupying Houchin-Lillers Line. The 1st/6th Battalion's war diary might be more specific their activity in May. It is only available at The National Archives at Kew in Catalogue reference WO 95/2687/1.
The 2nd/6th Battalion's war diary is at Kew in Catalogue reference WO 95/3021/9.
There is no evidence to identify to which battalion Joseph was posted in May 1918 although the parent battalion the 1st/6th would have been the preferred and natural destination. There is circumstantial evidence that the 1st/6th Battalion was in action near Houchin on May 16th 1918, or at least suffered from artillery bombardment, losing six men killed.
In the absence of evidence, all that can be asserted is that Joseph may have been with the 1st/6th Battalion when he was gassed on May 16th 1918.
With kind regards,
Alan
Reply from: Alan Greveson
Date: Sunday 19th January 2014 at 11:24 PM

Proofing corrections: In paragraph three insert the definitive article "the" before "Houchin - Hilliers Line" and insert the word "about" to read "to be more specific about their activity in May."
Reply from: Keith Harrison
Date: Sunday 9th March 2014 at 7:48 PM

Hello Alan. I just wanted to thank you very belatedly for your kind help re my grandfather Joseph. I'm so sorry it's taken me so long to reply to you, especially after you replied so promptly. Your response is very helpful to me and it's very much appreciated.
With best wishes - Keith

Posted by: Jennifer Ellis {Email left}
Location: Cardiff
Date: Saturday 18th January 2014 at 8:58 PM
Hi Alan -

I was wondering if you could help with with any information on what my Great Grandfather would have done in WW1.His name was John Elias Profit ( Dec 1894 - 1936). I have accessed via Ancestry.co.uk his service records that state he was with Regiment No135029, Regiment Name MT Learner.

I would be grateful if you have any knowledge or can point me in the right direction on where to look to explain what his role may have been or where he served in France. My grandmother was only 3 when he died and her mother died when she was 10 so there were no family stories handed down - just two photos - one in his uniform and one somewhere in France with some of his regiment.

Many thanks in advance for any information you can provide.

Jen Ellis
Reply from: Alan Greveson
Date: Sunday 19th January 2014 at 5:06 PM

Dear Jen,
John Profit volunteered to join the Army on October 25th 1915. He was 20 years old and a hairdresser in civilian life; a skill which his colleagues might later appreciate. John joined the Army Service Corps (ASC). His regimental number was prefixed with "DM2" which indicated he joined as a Mechanical Transport (MT) Learner. The Army Service Corps provided the supplies and transport of materiel for the Army. Most transport was by horse and waggon but as the war developed, the use of mechanical transport was expanded and used for moving heavier materiel such as artillery shells and ammunition from the rail-heads towards the Front where horses were again employed to get close up to the guns. By October 1915, voluntary recruitment had fallen to a low-point and yet the ASC needed more lorry drivers, so there was a demand for men to learn how to drive the new, modern motor lorries.
John trained in the UK at Osterley Park, Hounslow, which was the home of the MT Training Depot where drivers were taught. He was sent to France on 3rd January 1916, sailing from Southampton on SS "Caesarea" on the night of the 4th January, arriving at Rouen the next morning. All soldiers arriving in France spent some time at a base camp on the coast where they were given additional training before being sent to their units. John was first posted to the MT Base Depot Rouen and then to the one at Calais on 22nd January 1916 where he stayed until 12th March 1916 when he was posted to the 2nd ASC Column via the Lines of Communications Reserve of General Headquarters Troops Supply Column.
These titles are convoluted and don't always explain where a man was, or what he was doing. The titles can be that of the ASC Company in which a man was serving, described simply by a number, or the descriptive title of the role performed by that numbered company, such as an ammunition column.
"Lines of Communications" (LoC) were the roads, railways and canals leading towards the Front and back again from the coastal ports, where troops and materiel arrived or departed. The LoC had to be controlled; protected and kept open by "LoC Troops". The "Reserve" in this case was a base area at which ASC troops and vehicles were concentrated and, from which they were dispersed, along the Lines of Communication. A "reserve park" also held in reserve two days' supplies for a Division and had some Army Troops held for deployment by an Army HQ in an emergency. General Headquarters was the command headquarter of the British Expeditionary Force. As well as planning the strategy of the war, GHQ was responsible for transporting supplies and equipment imported from England, and managed all the transport networks and decided the construction of new roads. A "Troops Supply Column" was an ASC Company that provided the transport of materiel to the Front.
Soldiers were usually moved by railways or undertook route marches on foot. There were also ASC Omnibus companies.
An MT Company consisted of about 330 men who operated some 60 lorries. Lorry Parks and Ammunition Parks were their bases and the Supply Columns operated between the railheads (where stores arrived from the supply depots at the coast) and refilling points via rendezvous. The lorries handed-over their loads to be left at the refilling points and returned to the railhead. The distance for one return journey from railhead to refilling point was not to exceed 90 miles.
So, John was sent from Rouen to Calais and then to GHQ which had been initially at St Omer but moved to Montreuil in March 1916. John's first operational unit was "2nd ASC Col" which he joined on March 13th 1916. This could have been an abbreviation for II Corps (2nd Corps) Troops Supply Column operated by No. 387 Company ASC, or II Army (Second Army) Troops Supply Column operated by 385 Company ASC. Fortunately, the entry for 18th April 1916 makes it clear he was posted to 2 ATS Column, which makes it the 2nd Army Troops Supply Column.
John was driving lorries in the Ypres area. On 15th April 1916 he was treated for scabies at No 50 (1st Northumbrian) Casualty Clearing Station which was in the Hazebrouck area in northern France at the time. In June 1916 he had another visit to the doctor, this time at 12 Casualty Clearing Station which was also at Hazebrouck, to the rear of the Front in the Ypres salient.
It is probable John was driving ammunition supplies to the heavier guns of the siege batteries of the Royal Garrison Artillery, as those batteries were controlled at Army Headquarters level of command and so they would need ASC MT Companies also under Army HQ command. His service record appears to have a page missing as there is a gap between 9th September 1916 and 21st March 1918. On 21st March 1918 he was posted to Vehicle Reception Park 2nd Army, so it seems he had remained with 2nd Army from 1916 to 1918. On 28th March 1918 he arrived at MT Reserve Vehicle Park North which was at Calais and was temporarily attached to D.A.D.T (Deputy Assistant Director of Transport) before returning to GHQ Troops MT Company, Montreuil, awaiting a new posting. I wonder if he could have been a chauffeur driver to the Deputy Assistant Director of Transport at Calais?
On 12th May 1918 he was temporarily posted to No 3 Auxiliary (Petrol) Company (operated by 315 Company ASC) which was based on the coast at Etaples. This was not a petrol delivery company but another of those descriptive titles. It was the 3rd Auxiliary MT Company which operated petrol lorries. One reason for these titles was to ensure that when admin staff posted a man from one unit to another, he was not sent to a company operating motor lorries if he could only ride a horse.
On 10th June 1918, John returned to Calais and on the 29th June 1918 he was back "home" at 2nd Army Troops MT Company. Notice how the title has changed. By 1918 the mechanised "Supply Columns" became re-named MT Companies. On 2nd July 1918 he was posted to 604 MT Company which had acted as Ammunition Column for 65th Siege Battery Royal Garrison Artillery and became XV Corps Siege Park (ammunition supply). Changes in title and MT Company were common and one reason men appeared to move around was because they knew the roads and routes in the area of operations. When MT companies took on different roles or were re-allocated, it was necessary for them to inherit some drivers with experience of local roads in order to assist the newcomers to the area.
In the first two weeks of October 1918 John had some leave and on his return would have been at a coastal base camp before being posted, just after the Armistice, to 641 MT Company ASC, which had provided the Ammunition Column for 57 Siege Battery RGA in France and was later attached to III Corps. III Corps was commanded by Lt-General Richard Butler and consisted of the 55th (West Lancashire) Division and the 74th (Yeomanry) Division which had taken part in the final advance in Artois in October 1918. At the Armistice elements of III Corps had crossed the River Dendre and had occupied the town of Ath in Belgium. They moved to the area of Rebaix Tournai in Mid-November 1918. On March 18th 1919, John was serving with 100 SBAC (100 Siege Battery Ammunition Column) at Brussels when volunteered to remain overseas for a further year and was posted to No 8 MT Vehicle Reception Park on 30th April 1919. He had a fortnight's leave in June 1919 and returned to GHQ Reserve MT Company.
On 14th March 1920, his additional year was over and he was medically examined for return to the UK at Abele, a hamlet near Poperinghe in Flanders. Two days later he crossed the Channel to the UK and he was demobilized from the Army 15th April 1920 at the age of 25. His specialist military skill was recorded as "lorry driver".
John qualified for the British War Medal and the Victory Medal. His medal index card is indexed by ancestry.co.uk as "John E Profitt" with a double 't'.
The ASC became the RASC when they received the Royal prefix in late 1918. The British GHQ at Montreuil closed on April 5th 1919. However, there was plenty of clearing up to be done in France and Belgium, while the British Army occupied the Rhineland until they left Cologne in January 1926. Some troops stayed on in Wiesbaden until 30th June 1930.
It was the demobilized men of the ASC MT Companies who started the commercial road haulage industry after the war.
With kind regards,
Alan
Posted by: S Mcfarlane {Email left}
Location: Belfast
Date: Thursday 16th January 2014 at 8:21 PM
Hello Alan can you get me any info on Private James Hope 7696 Royal Welsh Fusiliers and he died 1915. Thank you.
Reply from: Alan Greveson
Date: Friday 17th January 2014 at 1:27 PM

Dear S Mcfarlane,
Unfortunately, no individual service record has survived for James Hope so it is not possible to state his wartime service. An Army medal rolls index card showed he entered France on August 22nd 1914 and served with the 2nd Battalion Royal Welsh Fusiliers. The 2nd Battalion had actually arrived in France on 11th August 1914, so James may have been posted to them as part of a draft of reinforcements. The 2nd Battalion was serving with the 19th Brigade at Valenciennes when James joined them. On 12th October 1914, the Brigade joined 6th Division in the trenches in Flanders where it remained until 31st May 1915 when it joined 27th Division. On 19th August 1915 the Brigade moved to 2nd Division. The Division fought in the Battle of Loos in September 1915 and James was killed in action on the opening day of that battle on 25th September 1915. He is buried at Cambrin Churchyard extension, Pas de Calais, France. James qualified for the 1914 Star, the British War Medal and the Victory Medal.
"Soldiers Died in the Great War" (HMSO 1921) stated he was born at Cubbington, Warwickshire, and enlisted at Coventry. A James Hope was baptised at Cubbington on 30th November 1884, the son of James, a groom, and his wife Sarah. James had married Sarah Minford in 1882, but she died in May 1886 and James senior re-married to Ada Granshaw. James, the son, born 1884, became a groom. In the 1911 census he was recorded as being 27, single, and living with his half-brother Cyril, a married baker at Cotteridge, King's Norton, Birmingham.
With kind regards,
Alan
Reply from: Roy S Davies
Date: Sunday 10th August 2014 at 1:46 PM

The James Hope, mentioned in your post, was my Great Uncle. He was the eldest of three siblings, Ada (my maternal Grandmother), Ernest, who also served in 2nd Battalion Royal Welsh Fusiliers and survived both world wars, and Cyril (mentioned in your post).

He is remembered in the Book of Remembrance at the Birmingham Hall of Memory, and on their website.

Roy Davies
Reply from: Roy S Davies
Date: Sunday 10th August 2014 at 3:33 PM

Alan,

I have just spotted an error in your reply of 17 Jan 2014.

James Hope's step-mother, my Great-grandmother, is incorrectly shown as Ada Granshaw. The surname should be Grantham. She was born 1869 in Pillerton Hersey, Warwickshire, daughter of Thomas and Elizabeth Grantham. She married my Great-grandfather, James Hope Snr. 1887. My grandmother, Ada Elizabeth, was born in 1888, Ernest in 1890, and Cyril in 1992. James Hope Snr. died in January 1898 in Birmingham.

Thanks,

Roy Davies
Reply from: Alan Greveson
Date: Sunday 10th August 2014 at 3:41 PM

Dear Roy,
Thanks for pointing that out. I agree that it should be Ada Grantham.
Kind regards,
Alan
Posted by: Jan Smith {Email left}
Location: Birmingham
Date: Wednesday 15th January 2014 at 6:57 PM
Hi
My grandfather Joseph Henry Dear joined the RFA on 9/6/1915 His number was 31012 and it seems he was in 177th brigade and the 68th brigade. He was a driver and I have located his service record where it says he was wounded by a gun shot wound to the face and scalp and was sent back via a hospital ship HMS Cambria. He was also kicked by a horse and damaged his knee. I am interested in exactly where he spent his years during the war. Can anybody help

Jan Smith
Reply from: Alan Greveson
Date: Wednesday 15th January 2014 at 8:06 PM

Dear Jan,
On June 9th 1915, Joseph Dear enlisted at Fulham. The next day he was with with his local Fulham-based Territorial Force Artillery brigade, numbered 237th (Fulham) Brigade. Three days later he was posted to be trained with 5C Reserve Brigade RFA at Charlton Park, Wiltshire, from 13th June 1916. He joined 177th Brigade RFA, possibly in October 1915. The Brigade was at Bordon in Hampshire in January 1916 before going abroad. 177 Brigade was more formally designated in Roman numerals as CLXXVII Brigade RFA. CLXXVII Brigade RFA joined the 16th (Irish) Division in France on 22nd February 1916. Joseph was wounded on the scalp and face by a "GSW Gun shot wound" but that could describe a wound caused by shrapnel or shell fragments. He was wounded on 26th May 1916 before the Division had been engaged in a major battle and was preparing for the major offensive on the Somme in the summer. He was returned to the UK and spent three weeks in hospital at Norwich being treated for "contusion to face", followed by three weeks' convalescence. While he was treated in hospital the UK, Joseph was administered by 4A Reserve Brigade RFA at Woolwich and was posted as part of a draft of reinforcements on 20th August 1916 to the 68th Brigade RFA (LXVIII Brigade RFA) which was serving with 10th Division in Macedonia and Salonica and was administered by 10th Divisional Ammunition Column (10 DAC). He arrived there on 9th September 1916. The complete 10th Division left Salonica on 18th August 1917 for Egypt. For his year in Salonika see:
http://www.1914-1918.net/salonika.htm
The Division was in Egypt from 16 October 1917 and then fought in the Palestine Campaign for a year. See:
http://www.1914-1918.net/palestine.htm
On 12 November 1918 the Division concentrated at Sarafand, Palestine, in preparation for a move back to Cairo, Egypt, by 1st December 1918. It sailed for the UK from Port Said and Joseph was discharged to the reserves in the UK on 4th August 1919. Officially, his wartime commitment to the reserves was deemed to have ended on March 31st 1920, although in reality he had been back in civvies since the previous August.
With kind regards,
Alan
Reply from: Jan Smith
Date: Wednesday 15th January 2014 at 8:31 PM

Hi Alan
Thats great how on earth do you do it and so quickly! I will look up the references you suggest

Many thanks

Jan Smith
Posted by: Pete {No contact email}
Location: York
Date: Wednesday 15th January 2014 at 10:35 AM
My grandfather was in RFC (France) in a unit called 4 RLP later transferred to 19 RLP, after exhaustive searching I cannot find what these abbreviations stand for, can anybody please help. Pete
Reply from: Alan Greveson
Date: Wednesday 15th January 2014 at 11:25 AM

Dear Pete,
Before the outbreak of war in 1914 the Royal Flying Corps had identified a need for vehicles, tenders, motorcycles and trailers to provide transport for the flying Squadrons of the RFC's Military Wing, but there was no money in the peacetime budget to provide them. The British government then inaugurated a scheme whereby civilian commercial companies could purchase the then innovative motor lorries with the aid of a government grant on the understanding that those subsidised vehicles would be commandeered by the RFC in the event of war.
Once the BEF went to France, transport parks were formed of 26 lorries and tenders and six motorcycles, some of them still bearing their commercial colours such as the bright red of "Maple's Stores".
Along with aircraft parks; ammunition columns; and salvage units; the transport was based in "parks"; with two parks to an Army. "RLP" stood for "Reserve Lorry Park". In November 1918, The orbat (order of battle) for the RAF (so named from April 1st 1918) with the British Third Army was:
RAF 3rd Brigade: 12th Wing: Nos. 12, 13, 15, 59, Squadrons, "N" Flight; 13th Wing: Nos. 56, 60, 87, 201, & 210 Squadrons; 90th Wing: Nos. 3, 11, 57, & 102 Squadron; 3rd Balloon Wing: Nos. 3, 11, 57, & 102 Companies; 3rd Aircraft Park; 3rd Reserve Lorry Park; 19th Reserve Lorry Park; No. 6 Salvage Section and No. 9 Salvage Section.
The orbat for 4th Army was: RAF: 5th Brigade: 15th Wing: Nos. 12, 13, 15, & 59 Squadrons
"N" Flight; 22nd Wing: Nos. 24, 46, 80, 84, 85 & 208 Squadrons; 89th Wing: Nos. 20, 23, 92, 101, 211, 218 Squadrons; 5th Balloon Wing: Nos. 13, 14, & 15 Companies; 4th Aircraft Park; 4th Air Ammunition Column; 4th Reserve Lorry Park; 12th Reserve Lorry Park and No. 7 Salvage Section.
With kind regards,
Alan
Reply from: Pete
Date: Wednesday 15th January 2014 at 12:09 PM

Hi Alan, thanks a lot. My grandfather was a carpenter/joiner by trade, and we assumed he had been repairing aircraft. Were personnel at these RLPs involved in this sort of work, because he sent home obvious pieces of propeller made into various ornaments, and they kept him in as some sort of LAC instructor at an RAF base at Adershot? until April 1920. Is there any way of finding out where these RLPs were based, or did they keep moving around.
Thanks again Pete
Reply from: Alan Greveson
Date: Wednesday 15th January 2014 at 6:52 PM

Dear Pete,
It does seem quite logical that a carpenter would have access to aircraft parts as the salvage and Air Parks not only repaired aircraft but also made furniture and other fittings. If the RLP was co-located with one of these other units then it is more likely. Specific locations for the RLPs might be shown in the "Summary of Works" records (war diaries) kept by RFC/RAF support units which are held at The National Archives (TNA), but a search of the TNA catalogue for "Lorry Park" produces only: "Air Ministry: Air Historical Branch: Papers (Series I). Miscellaneous. Disbandment: 19 Reserve Lorry Park, August 1919, (Catalogue ref: AIR 1/1019/204/5/1389) that is of interest to your grandfather's service.
Or, the locations might have been recorded under the diaries of a superior headquarters, such as the relevant RFC Brigade HQ or such records as "Air Historical Branch: Papers (Series I). Miscellaneous. Squadron and aircraft park daily personnel, aircraft and M.T. returns" or, for example, "Air Ministry: Air Historical Branch: Papers (Series I). 6 Aircraft Park, later 3 and 4 Army Aircraft Park. Weekly field returns." The abbreviation "M.T." stood for mechanical transport which would have physically come from a lorry park.
Locations of RFC/RAF units between February 1917 and September 1918 are held in AIR/1/2112/207/52.
If sections of men and their vehicles were attached to the flying squadrons of the wings, then men and vehicles might have been dispersed on a day-to-day basis from the HQ of the Reserve Lorry Park to be located with the squadrons themselves.
At the end of the war, 4 RLP was located at Premont, to the North of St Quentin and 19th RLP was at Bihucourt, just to the North-west of Bapaume. The RAF base at Aldershot was possibly Farnborough.
Your grandfather's individual record sheet should be available to download from The National Archives website for a small fee. See:
http://nationalarchives.gov.uk/records/looking-for-person/royalflyingcorpsairmen.htm
His record would show the dates when he served in different units. From there you would need to visit The National Archives and search the hierarchical RFC operational records to get a picture of day to day events. The hierarchical structure of Air Force records is shown at:
http://discovery.nationalarchives.gov.uk/SearchUI/browse/C958?cK=C2058&sUp=true&sK=C958
There is more general research advice at:
http://www.rafmuseum.org.uk/documents/Research/Research-Enquiries/e-Info-Sheet-3-Units.pdf

With kind regards,
Alan
Reply from: Pete
Date: Wednesday 15th January 2014 at 10:48 PM

Hi Alan, thanks again. Wow! I think you`ve given me enough to search through. I`ve already purchased his war record from National Archives but that just said 17/7/17 - 24/8/19 -- france! Many thanks, Pete
Posted by: Elaine {Email left}
Location: Iceland
Date: Wednesday 15th January 2014 at 1:52 AM
Hello
I have recently discovered my great uncle Thomas Arnott Millar was killed in WW1 at the Second Battle of Gaza.
he came from Dreghorn Ayrshire and I believe enlisted with the 52nd Lowland Brigade in Kilmarnock , according to the Common wealth graves commission he is buried at Gaza and it states he was a member of the Royal Scots Fusiliers "A" Coy. 1st/4th Bn, he was a Pte and his number 200973.
I have also managed to get his Medal Index but doesnt tell me much other than he had a previous number 8780 and was awarded the Victoria and British medals.
I would appreciate any additional information regarding him and or his regiment.
regards
Elaine
Reply from: Alan Greveson
Date: Wednesday 15th January 2014 at 8:55 AM

Dear Elaine,
Unfortunately, no individual service record has survived for Thomas Millar, so it is not possible to state his wartime service. An Army medal rolls index card recorded he qualified for the British War Medal and the Allied Victory Medal. His two regimental numbers were a result of all the men of the Battalion being re-numbered with six-digit numbers in the first few weeks of 1917. As Thomas did not qualify for the 1914-15 Star for service overseas before December 31st 1915, he did not go overseas until some date after January 1st 1916.
The 1st/4th Battalion Royal Scots Fusiliers had left England on 21st May 1915, therefore Thomas was probably part of a draft of reinforcements sent overseas sometime in 1916 or 1917. The 52nd Division served on the Gallipoli Peninsula in 1915 before being sent to the Suez Canal defences in Egypt in January 1916 where it was engaged at Dueidar on April 22nd and Romani on 4th August 1916 during the defence of the canal. During the Palestine Campaign the Division was in reserve at the First Battle of Gaza (26th 27th March 1917) and was engaged at the Second Battle of Gaza (17th 19th April 1917).
With kind regards,
Alan
Reply from: Elaine
Date: Wednesday 15th January 2014 at 4:28 PM

Alan
thank you very much for your help.
Posted by: Bella {No contact email}
Location: Esher
Date: Tuesday 14th January 2014 at 2:45 PM
Dear Alan,

Dare I ask!

James Johnson born Eynsford, Kent 1816 married a Elizabeth Haines (presume with i and not y) also of Eynsford.

The 1841 Census shows them still in Eynsford with 4 children, namely Maria 5, Mary 4, James (my g.gf) 3 and William 1.

Doing a little calculation have worked out that they were married around 1833 but nothing shows up anywhere. Do sites go back further than 1837 and is there a site you use which might be helpful.

In anticipation, with kind regards.

Bella
Reply from: Alan Greveson
Date: Tuesday 14th January 2014 at 4:40 PM

Dear Bella,
No problem.
For pre-1837 marriages it is necessary to search parish registers, usually on microfilm at the local county record office. There is a free collection of transcriptions on the "Familysearch" website, but it is by no means complete.
The website does record two possible marriage entries for both the 1st and the 8th December 1833 at St Mary Cray, Kent. (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.1.1/NNYF-J4Z: accessed 14 Jan 2014), James Johnson and Elizabeth Haines, 01 Dec 1833.
For a list of Kent parishes covered by "Familysearch" see:
http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~hughwallis/IGIBatchNumbers/CountyKent.htm#PageTitle

For other counties, click on the "country page" link at the top.
Click on the blue links for each parish to search either "C" baptisms or "M" marriages between the dates indicated.
With kind regards,
Alan
Reply from: Bella
Date: Tuesday 14th January 2014 at 10:28 PM

Dear Alan,

Many, many thanks. I will revue sites given.

With kind regards.

Bella
Posted by: Bella {No contact email}
Location: Esher
Date: Sunday 12th January 2014 at 12:58 PM
Dear Alan,

Wonder if you can help.

Alice Mabel Johnson born Greatness, Kent, 17th January 1879. Parents James and Jane Johnson. Most girls would have gone into service at the age of 14 but unable to find on 1901 census which would make her 22 years of age. She could of course be married but so far have been unable to detect.

Chances are you will fare better (I am only the amateur!)

Hope your new year started well.

With kind regards.

Bella
Reply from: Alan Greveson
Date: Sunday 12th January 2014 at 4:49 PM

Dear Bella,
In the 1881 and 1891 England censuses Alice Mabel Johnson, daughter of James and Jane, was recorded as living with her parents and siblings at Otford, Kent. It is probable that Alice believed she had been born at Otford, a detail which might later have been recorded in the 1901 Census.
It is possible, therefore, that she was Alice Johnson, domestic cook, born 1879, Otford, Kent, single, employed by Dr and Mrs Henry William Fitzgerald Powell, at 7 Connaught Street, Paddington, London. (RG13/14, folio 7, page 5). It is not clear where she went after that.
With kind regards,
Alan
Reply from: Bella Esher
Date: Sunday 12th January 2014 at 4:57 PM

Many, many thanks Alan.

Most helpful.

With kind regards.

Bella
Posted by: Tess {No contact email}
Location: Newton Abbot
Date: Saturday 11th January 2014 at 4:31 PM
Hi Alan,
Thank you for your previous assistance.
I have moved my research for Newton Abbot Museum onto Seale-Hayne, nr. Newton Abbot, where soldiers were treated for shell-shock by Dr Hurst.
I have seen the 1917 Pathe News reel which has images of the treatment the soldiers underwent, and this has some names attached.
Against all odds, I have found, Pte. Philip Ross Smith's pension and medal record - G/40040, Queen's Royal West Surrey, but wondered if you knew of a source for others treated at Netley and Seale-Hayne. They all appear to have surnames like King, Williams, Richards!
Thanks,
Tess
Reply from: Alan Greveson
Date: Saturday 11th January 2014 at 10:38 PM

Dear Tess,
Records of the military hospitals in the UK during the First World War have not survived, although where a military hospital also existed as a civilian hospital after the war some admission and discharge records might have survived at the hospitals themselves; in record offices; the special collections of universities or the Wellcome Library. Until the creation of the National Health Service in 1948, patients' records were kept by doctors or hospitals with no centralisation. Because of the specialised nature of the medical work at Seale-Hayne College while it was a military hospital there may be a few records held in local archives, but it would be necessary to search the individual local catalogues or the A2A (Access to Archives) database. Some individual doctors kept their own records and disposed of them after the war although some could remain in private hands.
Seale-Hayne was created as an agricultural college and as such its records may have been archived by the Department of Education; the Ministry of Agriculture; Plymouth Polytechnic (Polytechnic South West) which is now Plymouth University, or the local authorities. The college was operated as an independent charity endowed by Charles Seale-Hayne.
There is no centralised repository for medical records of those treated at Seale-Hayne or Netley. Netley was the Royal Victoria Hospital at Southampton, known as Netley Hospital from the locality. The types of record that may have been archived are admission and discharge books; clinical records and hospital records. In general very few clinical records have been kept and those that have survived are closed for 100 years. Seale-Hayne was used as a 350-bed military hospital for neurasthenic treatment for soldiers (not officers) under Major Arthur Hurst MB B.Ch (Oxon) RAMC from April 1918 until late 1919. Netley was a vast hospital that had a number of wards for neurasthenic treatment. Their general records are held by the RAMC Muniment Collection which is housed at the Wellcome Library, but there are scant clinical records for the tens of thousands of men that were treated there between 1863 and 1978. See:
http://www.nationalarchives.gov.uk/hospitalrecords/details.asp?id=2350&hospital=royal+victoria&town=&searchdatabase.x=0&searchdatabase.y=0
The Wellcome Library also has some biographical details of Sir Arthur Frederick Hurst and the post-war "medical pilgrims". See:
http://www.aim25.ac.uk/cgi-bin/vcdf/search
Dr Hurst rose to Lieutenant-Colonel in rank and after the war, he moved to London where he worked at Guy's Hospital.
His work at Seale-Hayne was filmed and written about in medical journals. A useful dissertation about Dr Hurst's work and Seale-Hayne military hospital by Edgar Jones, of King's College London Institute of Psychiatry, has been published in "The Journal of the History of Medicine and Applied Sciences". See:
http://www.kcl.ac.uk/kcmhr/publications/assetfiles/historical/jones2011-warneuroses.pdf
Dr Hurst's work was sponsored by the Medical Research Committee which is now the Medical Research Council. There was no Ministry of Health until 1919.

The sixteen soldiers named in the film were: Pte Read, (aged 32); Cpl Anderson, (aged 27); Pte Percy Meek, (aged 23) Pte Ross Smith, (aged 35); Pte Preston, (aged 19); Pte King, (aged 27); Pte Sandall, (aged 19); Pte Pudmore; Pte Willis; Sgt Peters; Pte Williams; Sgt Bissett; Pte Ashley; Pte Richards; Pte Bradshaw and Pte Eaglefield. Unfortunately, without further details it would not be possible to identify each of the sixteen positively and even if medical records had survived they would be closed to public access until 2018. A complete list of all soldiers treated at Netley and Seale-Hayne would be prohibitively large to consider; 50,000 patients were treated at Netley Hospital during the war.
Hospital records usually remain with the hospital or the Health Authority. In the case of Seale-Hayne, any archives might be in the control of Plymouth University or the Devon record offices. Devon record office has one document that might be of interest. It is a copy of an article about the hospital in the monthly "The War Pensions Gazette", dated September 1918 contained in "113 - Folder: newspaper cuttings, official circulars etc., concerning progress of war and care of wounded and dependants of servicemen" (Devon Record Office Catalogue ref: 1262M/0/O/LD/113/67).
The National Archives catalogue has two items from the time: "Seale-Hayne College Devon, Occupation by War Office as a military hospital" in MAF 33/47 (1917-1919) and "Newton Abbott, Seale Hayne (Agricultural and Technical College) General 1916-1920" in ED 37/408.
There is a small selection of First World War medical records in Catalogue series MH106, but it is only a 2 per-cent sample selected to illustrate the range of diseases and treatments from the war. It lists only ten UK War Hospitals and does not list Seale-Hayne College.
There are two internet pages relating to former patients of Seale-Hayne. One is for the painter Rupert Lee at: http://www.amazon.co.uk/Rupert-Lee-Painter-Sculptor-Printmaker/dp/1906593450
And the other for a soldier named Alfred Hutchinson, who walked out of the gates and wasn't seen again. It is:
http://www.cairogang.com/soldiers-killed/unknown-mar-1921/hutchinson/hutchinson.html

Searches for clinical records will generally become frustrated. However, medical admissions and discharges have survived in many archives. I once found in a university library collection a workhouse infirmary admissions book dating from 1920 that I was looking for, so it is always worth searching local catalogues online or sending an e-mail to an archivist.
Sir Arthur Frederick Hurst, of Oxford, died in August 1944.
With kind regards,
Alan
Reply from: Tess
Date: Wednesday 11th June 2014 at 10:31 PM

I appear to have omitted replying and thanking you for your assistance on this query. Very remiss of me - Sorry.

Thank you for your help over this. It is frustrating, but perhaps in 2018 all will be revealed. I will also pass your thorough response to the Archivist at Seale Hayne, now owned by the Dame Hannah Rogers Trust, as they too are seeking information on the patients etc.
Kind regards
Tess
Reply from: Alan Greveson
Date: Wednesday 11th June 2014 at 10:43 PM

Dear Tess,
No problem.
Alan

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