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Alan Greveson's World War 1 Forum (Page 89)

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Posted by: Suemsmith {Email left}
Location: Sheffield
Date: Tuesday 18th March 2014 at 1:40 PM
Dear Alan

I can't believe I missed this!

Charles Mellor
Estimated birth year: abt 1890
Age at enlistment: 24
Birth Parish: Stanton
Birth County: Staffordshire
Document Year: 1914
Regimental Number: 2796
Regiment Name: Guards Fusiliers
Number of Images: 4

George and Charles Mellor volunteered together on 14 October 1914, and were both (I think) enlisted in Sherwood Foresters but were both discharged the same day.

George Mellor, as you explained to me, was discharged under Reg 156/8 (he was too short until May 1915), and his brother Charles - I now realise was also discharged, but this time under Regulation 156/11 I cannot make out how tall he was but this is a different Regulation anyway. I can't see that he was killed, nor have I found medal card.

Would you please help me again?

Thank you

Sue
Reply from: Alan Greveson
Date: Tuesday 18th March 2014 at 5:29 PM

Dear Sue and Paul,
Charles Mellor was medically examined by a civilian doctor at Ashbourne on October 10th 1914. His height appears to have been altered between 5ft 3 and a quarter inches and 5ft 4 and a quarter inches; perhaps with and without shoes. On 11th October 1914, the minimum height requirement changed from 5ft 6ins to 5ft 5ins. Charles was attested and embodied into the 2nd/6th Battalion Sherwood Foresters on 14th October 1914 and was discharged on 14th October 1914 under Paragraph 566 (11) Territorial Force Regulations (medically unfit for further military service). There is nothing to state the cause, other than the suggestion he was not tall enough.
With kind regards,
Alan
Reply from: Suemsmith
Date: Wednesday 19th March 2014 at 12:02 PM

Dear Alan

As you say, they were both examined by Dr Hollick on 10 October 1914 - he was my Dad's doctor!

I wonder how Charles was affected when his brother was killed.

Many thanks again

Best wishes

Sue

Posted by: Howard Barkell {Email left}
Location: Lydford Devon
Date: Tuesday 18th March 2014 at 10:27 AM
Dear Alan,
Some time ago you kindly provided me with information about 75543 Gnr. Wyndham Wood RGA. Since then I have been contacted by a researcher from Seale Hayne who read your reply and who has sent me a signed photograph of Wyndham. He is standing between members of the RAMC, bareheaded, wearing a nondescript suit with a pipe in one hand and a sheaf of papers in the other. The interesting thing is that he is wearing his Silver Badge.
If he was supposedly discharged in 1917 and Seale Hayne was only used as a Military Hospital in 1918/19 is it likely that he was a patient there or could he have been just visiting, perhaps to help boost morale?
Kind regards,
Howard
Reply from: Alan Greveson
Date: Tuesday 18th March 2014 at 4:37 PM

Dear Howard,
Patients usually wore hospital blues (blue jacket, white collar, red tie) so someone visiting in civilian clothes wearing a silver War Badge would already have been discharged from the Army. It is possible he was volunteering in some way, or, as you, visiting. Seale Hayne patients were given days out; had their own concert party and were allowed to help local farmers with the harvest, so there would have been a good deal of community involvement in their work.
With kind regards,
Alan
Reply from: Howard Barkell
Date: Tuesday 18th March 2014 at 8:15 PM

Dear Alan,
Thank you for your reply. I don't think he can realistically be added to their list of patients without further evidence.
Howard

Posted by: Suemsmith {Email left}
Location: Sheffield
Date: Monday 17th March 2014 at 3:38 PM
Dear Alan

Could I check with you a couple of comments which Paul has made about John Bradshaw

Birth Place: Waterhouse, Staffs
Death Date: 9 May 1916
Death Location: France & Flanders
Enlistment Location: Holborn, London
Rank: C.S.M.
Regiment: Royal Welsh Fusiliers
Battalion: 15th Battalion
Number: 22801
Type of Casualty: Died of wounds
Theatre of War: Western European Theatre

"John Bradshaw is recorded as having enlisted at Holborn, London. His Medal Card indicates that he first served in France on 3 December 1915. By 1916 at the age of 40, he was serving as a Company Serjeant Major, service no 22801, in 15th Battalion (London Welsh) Royal Welsh Fusiliers.

(1.) His age and rank suggest that he may have previously served in the Army, and had been recalled to the colours.
(2.) His absence from the 1901 census may perhaps be explained by his being on active service in South Africa during the Boer War."

Can we make these two assumptions?

Many thanks

Sue
Reply from: Alan Greveson
Date: Monday 17th March 2014 at 7:45 PM

Dear Sue and Paul,
It seems likely. A John Bradshaw, born Sturston, Ashbourne, enlisted in the Sherwood Foresters Militia in 1891 stating his age as 17. He appears to have left the Militia after initial training to join the King's Royal Rifle Corps. Medal records for the Second Anglo-Boer War (1899 1902) identify soldiers only by their initial and regimental number. So, he might have been Rifleman 6662 Bradshaw J. of the 3rd Battalion King's Royal Rifle Corps entitled to the Queen's South Africa Medal. He transferred to the Army Reserve.
With kind regards,
Alan
Reply from: Suemsmith
Date: Monday 17th March 2014 at 9:24 PM

Dear Alan

Thanks for this information. It seems entirely possible; my only doubt, however, is that on Ancestry.co.uk John's place of birth is consistently given as Waterfall in Staffordshire, not Sturston. Coincidentally, his wife, Emma Sutton, was born in Sturston, Derbys.

Have you any thoughts?

Many thanks

Sue
Reply from: Alan Greveson
Date: Monday 17th March 2014 at 9:39 PM

Dear Sue and Paul,
I considered that. Sturston, Stanton (Derbys), and Waterfall (Staffs) were all in the Ashbourne (Derbyshire) registration district and there appears to be one birth in late 1874 or early 1875 at Ashbourne District. The ancestry census returns state Waterfall, SDGW states Waterhouse. CWGC state his parents were of Stanton (after the war in about 1920/21 when the information was collected). Waterhosue was mostly in the parish of Waterfall.
With kind regards,
Alan
Reply from: Suemsmith
Date: Tuesday 18th March 2014 at 10:35 AM

Dear Alan

Ah thanks for this. I am convinced!

Best wishes

Sue
Posted by: Sue Smith {Email left}
Location: Sheffield
Date: Sunday 16th March 2014 at 2:15 PM
Dear Alan,

Would you be kind enough to help us with some more queries please?

Name: Frederick George Udale
Birth Place: Ellastone, Derbyshire
Residence: Ellastone, Derbyshire
Death Date: 27 Apr 1917
Death Location: France & Flanders
Enlistment Location: Stokesley, Yorks
Rank: Private
Regiment: Lincolnshire Regiment
Battalion: 5th Battalion
Number: 241810
Type of Casualty: Died

We think from the Type of casualty info, burial place and unit history that Frederick Udale probably died whilst a POW (even if only for a few hours/days); would this assumption be correct?

We are a little confused as to why he resides in Derbyshire, enlists in North Yorkshire and then serves in the Lincolnshire regiment and would most appreciate any thought that you have on this.
Also as this regiment went to Ireland we would like to know if possible at what approximate date Frederick would have joined the regiment, i.e. whether he may have accompanied it there.

Many thanks in advance for any help you are able to give us.

Sue & Paul
Reply from: Alan Greveson
Date: Sunday 16th March 2014 at 6:53 PM

Dear Sue and Paul,
No service record has survived for Frederick George Udale so it is not possible to state his military service. His entry in the online version of "Soldiers Died in the Great War" has been altered by a contributor and might not have been accurately transcribed, as it recorded he was in the 5th Battalion when he died while the CWGC stated he was in the 2nd/5th Battalion. The entry appears to have been altered from "Place of residence: York" and "Theatre of war: Aldershot" both of which could apply to an entry for someone enlisting in Stokesley and being a potential prisoner. The SDGW entry on the ancestry.co.uk website therefore cannot be considered as evidence.
In the 1911 census he was recorded as a 13 year old hall boy at Okeover Hall. If he enlisted at Stokesley he might have moved to be a domestic servant there. There were 14 country houses listed at Stokesley in 1890. Perhaps his employer was connected to the Lincolnshire Regiment; or he may have enlisted with a friend with Lincolnshire connections.
The 2/5th Battalion Lincolnshire Regiment was raised, for war service only, on 6th February 1915 at Grimsby. It is not possible to say when Frederick Udale enlisted or whether he went to Ireland. The Lincolnshire Regiment had a 3rd/5th Battalion which trained reinforcements for the other two battalions, so he might have enlisted with the 3rd/5th before being posted to the 2nd/5th . SDGW stated he "died" which indicated a death caused other than by war or wounds (i.e. sickness or accident). Fontaine au Pire was in enemy hands. Records of PoWs and the Red Cross are held by the International Committee of the Red Cross in Geneva, Switzerland. They will be put online in August:
http://www.icrc.org/eng/resources/documents/article/other/archives-first-world-war-2011-07-27.htm

With kind regards,
Alan
Reply from: Suemsmith
Date: Sunday 16th March 2014 at 8:16 PM

Dear Alan

Many thanks for this information which is most illuminating and helpful.

I have just discovered that Frederick's mother was born in Tallington, which is near Stamford in Lincolonshire so I am going to try and trace her family a little more - this might just be the connection.

Many thanks

Best wishes

Sue
Posted by: Suemsmith {Email left}
Location: Sheffield
Date: Saturday 15th March 2014 at 7:31 PM
Dear Alan

You have been kind enough to answer some questions for Sue who is now getting the tea!

So may I presume upon you to answer a question for me (I am helping her with the Ellastone project)

Horace Arthur Walker
Birth Place: Ashbourne, Derby
Death Date: 24 Sep 1915
Enlistment Location: Stoke-on-trent, Staffs
Rank: Gunner
Regiment: Royal Horse Artillery and Royal Field Artillery
Number: 88695
Type of Casualty: Died of wounds
Comments: Formerly 34892, R.A.M.C

Lijssenthoek Military cemetery, Grave Reference III. A. 42.

From a website on Lijssenthoek Military cemetery

http://www.lijssenthoek.be/en/address/4028/-horace-arthur-walker.html

we have the information that Horace 'Died of gunshot wounds to the head, right thigh and right leg'.

As he was in the artillery and so not in the front line, my questions are

were the Germans using indirect machine gun fire at this stage of the war,
would it be an attack by aircraft, or
is there another more straight forward explanation for his injuries?

Many thanks for your help

Paul (of Sue & Paul)
Reply from: Alan Greveson
Date: Saturday 15th March 2014 at 7:54 PM

Dear Paul,
I suspect there is a straightforward answer. GSW was used to describe any puncture wound at the stage where a casualty first entered the casualty chain. He was labelled GSW (Gun Shot Wound). However, the cause could have been a round from a rifle or machine-gun; shrapnel ball from a shrapnel shell; or pieces of shell-casing or other metal spawl created by an explosion. Later, when a man arrived at a Field Ambulance or Hospital the surgical treatment of the wound and removal of any deleterious material would establish the precise cause.
The widest threat to an artilleryman was counter-battery fire from the enemy's howitzers, so the most likely cause of multiple GSW would be shrapnel or spawl from counter-battery shell-fire.
With kind regards,
Alan
Reply from: Suemsmith
Date: Saturday 15th March 2014 at 8:35 PM

Dear Alan,

Many thanks for your usual full and rapid response, it is most appreciated.

Best wishes
Paul & Sue
Posted by: Diane {Email left}
Location: Staines
Date: Saturday 15th March 2014 at 4:18 PM
Hi Alan
I am trying to find some information on my great great grandfather Charles Benjamin Stone(1857),all the information i know is that he was a long serving British Army soldier,and that of his wife Jane Bradshaw (who he met in Cahir, County Tipperary, another army garrison town).Charles was transferred back to English army bases, and in 1884, the expanding Stone family followed Charles to India where he defended the British Empire for a further eight years. Tragically, Jane died at the age of 28 (1887 muthura uttar pradesh )in india. At this point, widowed Charles Stone almost certainly sent his young children back to Cahir in Ireland, no doubt in the care of his deceased wife's family.
Can you give me any help on finding out his army career,and whether my Great great grandmother was buried in india or whether she was returned home?
Many thanks
Reply from: Alan Greveson
Date: Saturday 15th March 2014 at 7:55 PM

Dear Diane,
It is not possible to trace a soldier by his name only, so without knowing his regiment or regimental number it is not possible to state his service. The service records of Victorian soldiers were usually destroyed when they died. There are some surviving details of soldiers who received a pension, but there is no obvious record for Charles Benjamin Stone among them. Details of church burials in India are held in the India Office collection of The British Library in London. See:
http://www.bl.uk/reshelp/inrrooms/stp/rrbysubj/aasrr/aasrr.html

With kind regards,
Alan
Reply from: Diane
Date: Saturday 15th March 2014 at 8:03 PM

Hi alan.thanks so much,I guessed it would be a long shot as I had little info.thanks also for the info on burials.
Thanks again
Posted by: Suemsmith {Email left}
Location: Sheffield
Date: Saturday 15th March 2014 at 1:27 PM
Percival George Rowlinson
Royal Air Force Air Mechanic 2nd Class
Service No: 193110
Date of Death: 21/06/1920
Age: 19

You very kindly helped me previously with Percival Rowlinson. We have now received the Service Record from National Archives which show that he enlisted on 7 June 1918. His civilian occupation is listed as "Gardener".

He was discharged on 2 May 1919 unfit DRO/133; and an "Extract from OC" (?) indicates that he suffered VDH (Valvular Disease of the Heart) and was admitted to St Johns VOD (? VAD?) hospital on 30 November 1918. Do you think this would be a special hospital, or perhaps a local one?

There is also a Serial No 7018 noted and VDH(aggravated).

5/6 for 52 wks (condl) DRO/133 10 June 1919.
Should we read the above as a pension?

On the reverse: Award of Silver Badge 7562. 9 May 1919. We have researched Silver Badge and wonder if he would have been entitled to receive any other medal (not mentioned on Service Record nor could I find a medal card).

Best wishes

Sue and Paul
Reply from: Alan Greveson
Date: Saturday 15th March 2014 at 7:50 PM

Dear Sue and Paul,
If he joined in June 1918 he would have been compulsorily conscripted on or about his 18th birthday. In theory, according to the rules, he was not old enough to serve overseas until he was 18-and-a-half; and not able to serve at the Front until his 19th birthday. His valvular disease of the heart was "aggravated" by military service, which indicated it was a pre-existing condition. It was a common cause of early discharge as fitness training brought it into the open. The St John's VAD (Voluntary Aid Detachment) hospitals were hospitals run voluntarily in private houses and other premises in the UK. The Red Cross and St John's had a joint committee to run these hospitals. There could have been one named "St John's" but it is more likely it refers to the organisation as the nurses were often referred to as "St John's VAD". There was a "Hospital of St John and St Elizabeth", 60 Grove End Road, St Johns Wood, which served as a war hospital. There is no entry in the medal rolls index, so it is unlikely he served overseas to qualify for any campaign medals. The silver War Badge was issued for being discharged through sickness or wounds. He received a conditional pension of five shillings and sixpence a week, to be reviewed in 52 weeks.
With kind regards,
Alan
Reply from: Suemsmith
Date: Saturday 15th March 2014 at 8:32 PM

Dear Alan

Many thanks for this - it answers all the questions and gives us extra information which we didn't think to ask!

Best wishes

Sue and Paul
Reply from: Alan Greveson
Date: Sunday 16th March 2014 at 10:50 PM

Dear Sue and Paul,
Percy Rowlinson would have been what was known as an "erk" or an "airk" (aircraftsman). This expression dates from the early days of the RAF after 1 April 1918. It is said a poem written by a flying officer in 1920 made reference to the good work of the ground crew in keeping his aircraft serviceable: "Give me an airk who does not shirk; he's the boy for me."
With kind regards,
Alan
Posted by: Elaine {Email left}
Location: Glasgow
Date: Friday 14th March 2014 at 1:26 PM
I have discovered my grandfathers enlistment record from November 1914, however most of it is unreadable including the regiment and his number (all it has is Royal regiment of... RH - 77...), the legend goes that he was discharged after an Officer struck a horse and as he was a Farrier and hated cruelty to animals, he struck the Officer. Could you perhaps suggest where I could try searching next? With thanks and best wishes.
Reply from: Alan Greveson
Date: Friday 14th March 2014 at 5:16 PM

Dear Elaine,
If you can tell me his name, and any other biographical details,I can look at the records for you.
With kind regards,
Alan
Reply from: Elaine
Date: Tuesday 18th March 2014 at 1:05 PM

Hi Alan, he was enlisted on 10 Nov 1914 as James Davis (his middle name was Henry, but often records had him down as Henry James Davis) and he was born on 9 Dec 1893 in Lambeth, London. At the time of enlistment he was residing at 4 Calrence St, Paradise Rd, Clapham and was a Farriers Mate. We think he may have been enlisted to the Royal Regiment of Artillery (hence the horse connection) but are unsure. He died in Lambeth on 24 July 1964 in London. I'm trying to get hold of a photo that someone in the family has of him where he is wearing his uniform to see if there are any more clues.
Kindest regards, Elaine
Reply from: Alan Greveson
Date: Tuesday 18th March 2014 at 4:30 PM

Dear Elaine,
James Davis served as a driver and gunner in the Royal Field Artillery, regimental number 30969 from 10th November 1914. He was posted to the 16th Divisional Ammunition Column which was at Aldershot. On 29th January 1915 he was posted to the 74th Brigade RFA, but went absent without leave on the way from King's Cross and forfeited 12 days' pay when he eventually turned up. This was the first of numerous absences in the UK. The 16th Division was a Division of Irish regiments and the 16th DAC allotted men to the Artillery Brigades of the RFA within the Division. James was allotted to the 74th (LCCIV) Brigade RFA in the 16th Division at Aldershot. On 28th August 1915 he was sent overseas for the first time when the 74th Brigade was transferred from the 16th Division to the Guards Division. The Guards Division fought at the Battle of Loos, September 1915. On 20th June 1916 James was posted to 5th Division Ammunition Column which served in the 5th Division. The 5th Division was at St Laurent Blangy near the southern edge of Vimy Ridge, at Arras.
On the Somme, on 1 July 1916, the 5th Division was having a period of rest and re-fitting before fighting at The Attacks on High Wood; The Battle of Guillemont; The Battle of Flers-Courcelette; The Battle of Morval; and The Battle of Le Transloy. From October 1916, 5th Division was holding a more peaceful line near Festubert.
On 29th March 1917, James was arrested for stealing a watch belonging to a civilian. He was detained awaiting a Field General Court Martial which was held on 10th April 1917 at which he was sentenced to 28 days' imprisonment with hard labour. The sentence would probably have been served in the UK as he was next recorded at a reserve brigade in the UK on 14th November 1917 before being sent overseas for the second time on 15th March 1918. On 6th April 1918 he was gassed and was sent to hospital. He was returned to the UK on 19th May 1918 and was convalescing at Ripon Command Depot on 7th July 1918. On 20th August 1918 he was posted to No 4 Reserve Brigade, at Woolwich. He was discharged from Crystal Palace dispersal centre on 22 February 1919. On paper, he remained on the reserve until 31st March 1920. His military character was described as "fair" on a scale of four:
Very Good; Good; Fair; Poor.
He qualified for the 1914-15 Star; the British War Medal and the Victory Medal.
With kind regards,
Alan
Reply from: Elaine
Date: Thursday 20th March 2014 at 1:02 PM

Many thanks Alan, donation on the way to the legion. Elaine
Posted by: Catherine {Email left}
Location: Loddiswell
Date: Friday 14th March 2014 at 12:13 AM
I am puzzled by the following WW1 casualty details & hope that someone can provide an explanation

Harold Wyse Allin, 2nd Lieutenant, 6th Bn, King's Shropshire Light infantry, died 13 December 1917, aged 28, buried Kantara War Memorial Cemetery, Egypt

As far as I can tell the 6th Bn, King's Shropshire Light Infantry was attached to 60th Brigade, 20th (Light) Division but only served on the Western Front. So I do not understand how he came to die in Palestine.

I am preparing information for a village commemoration project and want to get all the facts.

Thanks,
Catherine
Reply from: Alan Greveson
Date: Friday 14th March 2014 at 10:44 AM

Dear Catherine,
Second - Lieutenant H.W. Allin, Shropshire Light Infantry, was promoted to Lieutenant on 1st July 1917 (London Gazette 6th November 1917 Issue number: 30370; page: 11539). It seemed possible that the promotion was in connection with an attachment to another battalion.
"Soldiers Died in the Great War" (HMSO 1921) stated he "died of wounds". He was buried at Kantara which had developed into a large military base and hospital centre. The CWGC says the cemetery was begun in February 1916 for burials from the various hospitals. It was noted that the 10th Battalion The King's Shropshire Light Infantry was formed at Cairo in March 1917 from former Yeomanry regiments of Shropshire and Cheshire, so they would have been in need of officers. There were two Harold Allins from Devon who served and died. Lieutenant Harold Wyse Allin was the son of Alfred Thomas and Ethel Wyse Allin, of Woolston, Loddiswell, Devon.
His military record is held by the National Archives at Kew and can be reproduced for a fee: See:
http://discovery.nationalarchives.gov.uk/SearchUI/details/C1085915?descriptiontype=Full&ref=WO+339/32013

Harold Wyse Allin was born on 28th December 1888, the only son of Alfred Thomas Allin, clerk in Holy Orders, and his wife Ethel Wyse. He was taught privately before going up to Magdalene College Cambridge. He managed the Home Farm on the family estate and in September 1914 he joined the Royal Devon Yeomanry as a trooper. He was commissioned on 16th January 1915 as a Second-Lieutenant in the King's Shropshire Light Infantry (Gazette dated 19th January 1916, page 611). He then served with the B.E.F. in France and Flanders from 3rd June 1916 as the machine-gun officer for the 6th Battalion KSLI. In October 1916, he was injured when his horse was shot dead and rolled over on top of him. He was in hospital for many weeks. On his recovery, he was posted to Egypt to join the 10th Battalion (Shropshire and Cheshire Yeomanry) KSLI. He was wounded fighting in the hills of Judea on 30th November 1917 and died at No 43 Stationary Hospital at El Arish on December 13th 1917. His company commander, C. W. Tomkinson, wrote to his parents: "On the same day that your son joined, began a series of very big marches, which took the battalion right out from Southern Palestine into the mountainous country round Jerusalem. During this hard and difficult time he thoroughly won his way into the affection of his platoon, as he was so cheerful and patient with the men, when all were tired out with the big distances and the heavy roads. You will realize what a terrific effort is involved in marching and fighting on this scale, and how much the cheerfulness and staunchness of an officer helps his men, as was most certainly the case with your son's platoon.
The man who was chiefly responsible for carrying him home told me how wonderfully brave he was and that he never complained at all. 1 was delighted to have him in my company; he is a great loss to us." (A Biographical Record of His Majesty's Naval and Military Forces who have Fallen in the War", Vol 3, Page 5, (De Ruvigny's Roll of Honour); Standard Art Book Company, Ludgate Hill, London.)

With kind regards,
Alan
Reply from: Catherine Phythian
Date: Tuesday 18th March 2014 at 5:58 PM

Dear Alan

Many thanks for such a prompt & detailed reply. This personal information about Second - Lieutenant H.W. Allin will make the display very meaningful for the village.

I do appreciate your help on this. I am trying to find as much information about the casualties on the Loddiswell War Memorial (South Devon) using the internet & other sources and have done pretty well but there are 1 or 2 others where I am struggling and may need to call on your help again.

Many thanks

Catherine
Reply from: Catherine Phythian
Date: Wednesday 2nd April 2014 at 1:53 PM

Dear Alan

I wonder if you could provide some of the missing details for my great great uncle: Albert Edward Guest (Private, 39012 2nd Bat, The Loyal North Lancashire Regiment). I have his CWGC information and I have used the Battalion history to find out a bit more regarding the circumstances of his death. I think it was the Battle of the Marne. But what I would really like to know is when and where he enlisted, and where he served. Did he volunteer or was it conscription? Given his age and the fact the he didn't join the Devonshire regiment like most of his fellow villagers I am inclined to think that he was called up and allocated to the branch of the army which was short of manpower. Can you help?

Many thanks

Catherine
Reply from: Alan Greveson
Date: Wednesday 2nd April 2014 at 6:14 PM

Dear Catherine,
Albert Guest volunteered at Newton Abbott on 25th November 1915 under the Derby Scheme of deferred enlistment which allowed men to "join now and serve later". It was essentially a last chance for men to volunteer before compulsory conscription. Albert was called-up on 14th January 1916, aged 37, and on 28th January 1916 he was sent to London where he joined the training depot of the Army Service Corps (ASC). In April 1916 he joined 662 Company ASC at Park Royal in London where he remained until 29th January 1917 when he was transferred to infantry training with the 48th and 49th Training Reserve Battalions at Prees Heath. As an infantryman he was sent to Alexandria in Egypt where he arrived on 4th August 1917 aboard the Hired Transport "SS Saxon". He was posted to the 2nd Battalion Loyal North Lancashire Regiment as part of a draft of reinforcements and he arrived with them on 12th August 1917 at Sidi Bishr. The Battalion served on Lines of Communication, meaning they protected the roads and railways. In May 1918 the Battalion moved to France, arriving on 25th May 1918. On 4th June 1918 the Battalion joined 94th Infantry Brigade in the 31st Division. But three weeks later it was moved to the 101st Brigade in the 34th Division which had recently been re-formed after being taken out of battle. The new division's first battle was fought at "The Battle of the Soissonais and of the Ourcq" on the Marne on 23rd July 1918. Albert Guest appears to have been killed in action on his first day of battle. His Battalion lost 25 men killed on 23rd July 1918.
Albert qualified for the British War Medal and the Victory Medal.
He is now buried at Villemontoire Cemetery which was constructed after the end of the war. The CWGC says: "Villemontoire is connected entirely with the advance of the 15th (Scottish) and 34th Divisions, under French leadership, in the period from the 23rd July to the 2nd August 1918.The cemetery was made, after the Armistice, by the concentration of graves from the battlefield and from several smaller burial grounds which had been made by the Burial Officers and units of the two Divisions, including:- Billy-sur-Ourcq Churchyard, which contained the graves of five soldiers, and Billy-sur-Ourcq commune cemetery, which contained the graves of three soldiers".
With kind regards,
Alan
Posted by: Rhodes {Email left}
Location: Netherlands
Date: Monday 10th March 2014 at 6:39 PM
Dear Alan.
I am looking for more information on my grandfather's service, since I have drawn a blank on Ancestry. William Edward Bradley (132790, b 1897) served in 495th Aux M Co ASC and 4th Army Auxiliary M.T.Coy (the titles seem to have been used interchangeably on the Motor Transport Passes I have, dated mid 1916). He was based near Villers Bocage, and after hospital treatment. then posted to East Africa. Would you be able to give any more information, particularly on his time in East Africa? Thank you in advance for any information you can provide.
Reply from: Alan Greveson
Date: Monday 10th March 2014 at 10:30 PM

Dear rhodes,
Unfortunately it is not possible to suggest his wartime service without an individual service record.
He qualified for the British War Medal and the Victory Medal. As he did not qualify for the 1914-15 Star he did not serve overseas until after January 1st 1916. The Western Front Association holds an archive of 6.5 million pension record cards (PRCs) which are not available elsewhere. They charge for a manual search of the records. See:
http://www.westernfrontassociation.com/about-the-wfa/175-pension-records/2961-pension-record-cards-manual-lookup-request.html
With kind regards,
Alan
Reply from: Rhodes
Date: Tuesday 11th March 2014 at 2:44 PM

Alan
Many thanks for the quick reply and the new information and lead. I shall follow up with the western front association. And make an extra contribution to the Poppy fund here!
Best regards

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