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Posted by: Tom {Email left}
Location: Australia
Date: Wednesday 23rd April 2014 at 1:00 PM
Hi Alan
A few months ago you provided me with some invaluable information based on a portrait photo. The photo was of my granduncle, James,'Jim' Moore, born 1878. We knew that Jim was Irish and served with the RGA No 4 Depot ( heavy and siege) based in Ripon prior to WW1. You were able to tell us that he had also served in the first and second Boer wars.
At the time, I gave you a number -41654- which I thought may have been his service number, but you were unable to locate any James Moore to that number. Just looking at the number again, the first number is, I think, the letter A. ie A1654. Is this possibly a service number? If it is, is there anything else you may be able to tell me?
Thank you in advance for any information at all
Kind Regards
Tom
Reply from: Alan Greveson
Date: Wednesday 23rd April 2014 at 7:40 PM

Dear Tom,
There are no records that match James Moore with the number A1654.
With kind regards,
Alan
Posted by: Tom {Email left}
Location: Australia
Date: Wednesday 23rd April 2014 at 12:58 PM
Hi Alan
A few months ago you provided me with some invaluable information based on a portrait photo. The photo was of my granduncle, James,'Jim' Moore. We knew that Jim was Irish and served with the RGA No 4 Depot ( heavy and siege) based in Ripon prior to WW1. You were able to tell us that he has also served in the first and second Boer wars.
At the time, I gave you a number -41654- which I thought may have been his service number, but you were unable to locate any James Moore to that number. Just looking at the number again, the first number is I think the letter A. ie A1654. Is this possibly a service number? If it is, is there anything else you may be able to tell me?
Thank you in advance for any information at all
Kind Regards
Tom
Posted by: Gill Sykes {Email left}
Location: Burton
Date: Tuesday 22nd April 2014 at 10:10 AM
Dear alan,
You have been very helpful recently so I am coming back for more! You have helped me with information about my grandfather Nathaniel Priest .who was injured in late 1916 early 1917. He served with the KOYLI's 8th(Service)
Battalion, 70th Brigade Serial No. 27219. Would there be any way of finding out where and when he was injure?.
Regards
Gill
Reply from: Alan Greveson
Date: Tuesday 22nd April 2014 at 8:19 PM

Dear Gill,
You would be very fortunate to find a record of where and when Nathaniel Priest was wounded. Soldiers' service records would have indicated a date, but these have not always survived, as in the case of Nathaniel Priest. Casualty lists were compiled at the time by the battalions in the field and were passed up to the War Office and then to the soldier's local record office who informed the next- of-kin. The letter sent to the next-of-kin (only officers' families were informed by telegram) might have survived in family muniments. Copies of the casualty lists were occasionally entered in the unit's war diary as appendices. The official casualty lists were published by the War Office and extracts were published in local newspapers. However, the official lists don't provide a date or location, but indicate within a week or two when a soldier was wounded. Official casualty lists only indicated the soldier's name and regimental number listed by regiment. Because the high number of casualties was an embarrassment to the government and a threat to civilian morale, "The Daily Telegraph" and the "Morning Post" ceased publishing the lists at the end of 1916, and towards the end of 1917 "The Times" restricted the lists to officers only. Local newspapers often published details relevant to their readership.
So, the search would be in war diaries; archived official casualty lists; or newspapers.
The 8th Battalion KOYLI war diary is held at The National Archives at Kew. Only a few war diaries list casualties by name. The 8 KOYLI war diary is in two parts. The earlier part up to the end of 1917 is available to download online for a charge of £3.30. See:
http://discovery.nationalarchives.gov.uk/SearchUI/Details?uri=C7353267

The official casualty lists are archived by The British Library in London. Their newspaper collection is undergoing a major change at the moment and is being moved to Yorkshire. Much of it is not available until Autumn 2014. See:
http://www.bl.uk/reshelp/findhelprestype/news/newspapermoves/index.html
and
http://www.bl.uk/reshelp/findhelprestype/news/newspapermoves/coll-moves-bull-march2014.pdf

The subscription website "The Genealogist" has transcribed some casualty lists.
Local newspapers of the time would be kept by the local studies library of the town in which Nathaniel lived.
In some cases, hospital admission records might have survived. They are held at various repositories around the country. There is a searchable database compiled by the Wellcome Library for the History and Understanding of Medicine. See:
http://www.nationalarchives.gov.uk/hospitalrecords/

With kind regards,
Alan
Posted by: Sindy {Email left}
Location: Carlisle
Date: Sunday 20th April 2014 at 4:17 PM
I hope someone can help me my great great uncle Ernest Brown, born in Bradford 1884- 14 Jan 1917, he was a Lance Corporal, 1st/4th Bat, Seaforth Highlanders, Service, No. 4303, died 14 January 1917, buried at Varennes Military Cemetery, France. I have a photo of his grave but dont have a photo of him and was wondering if you or anyone may have one. Also how and why did a Bradford man server in the Seaforth Highlanders when his family was still in Bradford. Hope some can help me with anything about him
Reply from: Alan Greveson
Date: Sunday 20th April 2014 at 6:57 PM

Dear Sindy,
No individual service record has survived for Ernest Brown so it is not possible to state his military service. An Army medal rolls index card recorded he qualified for the British War Medal and the Victory Medal. As he did not qualify for the 1914-15 Star for service overseas before December 31st 1915, he did not serve overseas until some date after January 1st 1916. Had he been compulsorily conscripted in 1916 or later he would have had no choice of regiment as men were posted "in the interests of the service" as required. The 4th Battalion Seaforth Highlanders had been in France since November 1914, so Ernest would have been sent to join them as part of a draft of reinforcements. One of the training battalions of the 4th Seaforth Highlanders was based at Ripon from November 1915.
"Soldiers Died in the Great War" (HMSO 1921) recorded he was born in Liverpool and enlisted at Bradford. He died of wounds on 17th January 1917 and was buried at Varennes which was the location of the 4th and 11th Casualty Clearing Stations from October 1916, and the 47th CCS from December 1916. In 1916 the 4th Battalion Seaforth Highlanders fought at The Attacks on High Wood (22nd 23rd July) and The Battle of the Ancre (1318 November). As Ernest died of wounds in France, he probably would have been wounded in the few days beforehand.
Photographs of individual soldiers were often taken by local photographers when men were first issued with their uniform and any such photographs would remain with the family. If a local newspaper published an obituary when he died, they might have borrowed a portrait from the family. Group photographs taken during training might have survived with the regimental museum, but they were rarely captioned with the names of individuals.
With kind regards,
Alan
Reply from: Sindy
Date: Sunday 20th April 2014 at 9:51 PM

Thank you for this information
Posted by: Phil Tomkins {Email left}
Location: Tyldesley Manchester
Date: Sunday 20th April 2014 at 12:25 PM
Hi Alan,

I am trying to find out the areas of conflict that my Grandfather, 54242 Tmomas H Hewitt, Royal Field Artillery served in during the Great War. His rank on discharge was Bombardier. Thanking you in anticipation.
Reply from: Alan Greveson
Date: Sunday 20th April 2014 at 3:24 PM

Dear Phil,
No individual service record has survived for Thomas Hewitt so it is not possible to state his wartime service. An Army medal rolls index card showed he first served in France from 15th September 1915. He qualified for the 1914-15 Star, British War Medal and the Victory Medal. One further source of information might be if he had applied for a pension. The Western Front Association holds an archive of 6.5 million pension record cards (PRCs) which are not available elsewhere. They charge an administrative fee for a manual search of the records. See:
http://www.westernfrontassociation.com/about-the-wfa/175-pension-records/2961-pension-record-cards-manual-lookup-request.html

With kind regards,
Alan

Posted by: Kate {No contact email}
Location: Bradford
Date: Sunday 20th April 2014 at 11:23 AM
Hello Alan

You have been so helpful in the past; I wonder whether I could trouble you with another fairly brief query.

How common (or rare) was it for a WW1 officer to come from a working class rather than the traditional upper/middle class background? I am researching the life of a 2nd Lieut ancestor, who lived and worked in very humble circumstances before the war, but I have no real knowledge of how unusual this was. Any helpful pointers would be appreciated as always.

Kate
Reply from: Alan Greveson
Date: Sunday 20th April 2014 at 1:25 PM

Dear Kate,
Prior to the First World War commissioned officers were drawn from the public schools and upper classes. A Non Commissioned Officer (NCO) had to have attained the first class education certificate before he could be considered for a commission. In the regular, peacetime, army, a soldier who had worked his way up through the ranks over 21 years to reach Warrant Officer Class One could be granted an honorary commission as Lieutenant and Quartermaster.
The public schools and Officers Training Corps continued to provide a source of junior officers throughout the war, but the supply could not equal the demand as casualties among the junior officers were disproportionally high. In the first six months of the war, the OTC provided 20,577 junior officers. But the newly raised battalions required far more officers than the OTC could provide and in January 1915 it was decided that NCOs and private soldiers could be recommended for a commission by their commanding officers. These candidates were given a four-week training course before being sent to Young Officer Companies for further training. Then in February 1916 a new system of training was established with a four month course being run at specialist Officer Cadet Battalions. By July 1917 there were 22 of these officer cadet training schools in the UK to run 16-week condensed instructional courses which provided essential training and inculcated a sense of service, duty and leadership. NCOs and men considered for a commission were passed through these schools before being granted temporary (wartime) commissions. Once commissioned the junior officers did not necessarily return to their previous unit. Officers who had been promoted from the ranks often fared better than the OTC men because they were more worldly-wise and had had experience of battle.
The officer cadet battalions commissioned 73,000 men during the war.
With kind regards,
Alan
Reply from: Kate
Date: Sunday 20th April 2014 at 2:54 PM

Alan - this is more than helpful! Your information explains a great deal about the likely scenario for 2nd Lieut Henry Smith (who went on to be awarded the Military Cross) and his family is extremely grateful. Thank you most sincerely, and a donation will be sent to the British Legion.
Kate
Reply from: Alan Greveson
Date: Friday 25th April 2014 at 9:33 PM

Dear Kate,
Thank you for making a donation to the Royal British Legion.
With kind regards,
Alan
Reply from: Mangoman70
Date: Wednesday 4th March 2015 at 12:14 PM

Alan I have a similar problem that I cannot get to the bottom of. I am researching the military history of my grandparents and grand uncles and am having some difficulty with one member of my family, Ewart Gladstone Blackmore born St, George Bristol in 1898. Aged 18 and a half Ewart was an Officer Cadet attached to the Buckinghamshire Battalion (Territorial Force) of the Oxfordshire and Buckinghamshire Light Infantry with its headquarters at 14, Temple Square, Aylesbury, Bucks. Upon completion of the training course he was made a 2nd. Lieutenant with a seniority date of 26th. September 1917.

Now my understanding is that the man had to serve in an Officer Training Corps before being accepted as an Officer Cadet who tended to be scholars at the Universities, colleges and grammar schools throughout the country. I haven't been able to establish what Ewart did as trade before being accepted as an Officer Cadet which would have aided him in becoming part of the future officers corps? I have also checked with Bristol Grammar School (as this is the city in which Ewart lived) and from where No. 3 Officer Training Battalion was based but they have no record of him attending the school.

Many of the Officer Cadets came from privileged background so am struggling fathom out how Ewart, a man from the working class - was selected as potential officer material. What would the selection process have been? I've been unable to find him as a 'ranker' (Other Ranks) so it appears that he wasn't promoted from within the infantry. Can anyone help?

In a nutshell how did an 18 1/2 year old teenager from a working class background be selected for a place in an Officer Training Battalion and why did he end up as a Cadet with the Oxf. & Bucks L.I. in 1917 bearing in mind he was born in Bristol. No. 4 OTB was based at Oxford University but our family do not know if he attended this university.
Reply from: Alan Greveson
Date: Wednesday 4th March 2015 at 3:09 PM

The information you have given appears to relate to an Ernest George Blackmore who in 1924 lived at 89 Ilford Lane, Ilford, Essex. He had served as a Lance-sergeant in the London Regiment and was commissioned into the Oxfordshire and Buckinghamshire Light Infantry on 25th September 1917. He was attached to the Machine Gun Corps.
The official government publication "The London Gazette" of 19th April 1918, published on 23th April 1918, listed a Ewart Gladstone Blackmore being appointed a Second-Lieutenant from an Officer Cadet Unit with effect from 27th March 1918 to a Territorial Force battalion of the Wiltshire Regiment. See:
https://www.thegazette.co.uk/London/issue/30644/supplement/4849
He qualified for the British War Medal and the Victory Medal and became a Lieutenant in the Wiltshire Regiment. His medal rolls index-card recorded he lived at 38 Summerhill Road, St George, Bristol, in 1925.
Because of the need for junior officers it was routine during war-time for men to be selected to attend Officer Cadet Units or Officer Cadet Schools. Ewart Blackmore would have been compulsorily conscripted on or about his 18th birthday and would have trained as a recruit. If a man showed leadership potential his commanding officer would have put his name forward for officer selection.
As a private soldier becoming an officer he would have been struck off the strength of his original unit and added to the officer strength of his new unit.
A Ewart Gladstone Blackmore (60629) served in the R.A.F. in the Second World War. He was appointed a pilot officer on probation on 31 January 1941 ("Gazette" 28th February 1941). See:
https://www.thegazette.co.uk/London/issue/35090/page/1213/data.pdf
Service records of officers who served also in the Second World War are still held by the Ministry of Defence. See:
https://www.gov.uk/get-copy-military-service-records/apply-for-someone-elses-records
With kind regards,
Alan
Posted by: Sharon {Email left}
Location: Uk
Date: Saturday 19th April 2014 at 9:49 PM
I am trying to find out where and when my great grandfather died. He was Company Sargeant-Major Frederick Sadler in the Royal Artillery. Although born in Flintshire Wales in 1853/4, he married Ellen Gilbert in Fareham and was based in Rawal Pendi, India duirng the 1880s where at least several children were born:

Frederick born 1884,

Ernest Percival born 1886, [Date Of Baptism 17 Oct 1886, Date Of Birth 17 Sep 1886, Father's First Name Frederick,
Mother's First Name Ellen, Place Thayetmyo,St John the Baptist, Presidency Bengal, Archive Reference N-1-263
Folio 18, Page - Catalogue Description Parish register transcripts from the Presidency of Bengal Record set British India Office births & baptisms]

Horace Cecil born 1888. [Date Of Baptism 8 Mar 1888, Date Of Birth 18 Feb 1888, Father's First Name Frederick, Mother's First Name Ellen, Place Rawal Pindi,Christ Church, Presidency Bengal, Archive Reference N-1-206, Folio 74, Page - Catalogue Description Parish register transcripts from the Presidency of Bengal, Record set British India Office births & baptisms]

Eustace Percival was born in 1889 in Aden [Date Of Baptism 14 Jul 1889, Date Of Birth 16 Jun 1889, Father's First Name Frederick,Mother's First Name Helen,Place Aden,Presidency, Archive Reference N-13-3, Folio -, Page -
Catalogue Description Aden, Record set British India Office births & baptisms]

but sister Ethel was born back in Gosport England in 1891 and the family can be found on the 1891 census as living at Rowner, Fort Grange, Stubbington Fareham Hants.

I know a younger child, my grandmother, Elsie Sadler was born in Seaforth Liverpool in December 1893 and that she was living with her grandparents, Henry and Louisa Gilbert back in Fareham in 1901. Elsie was raised by her grandparents which could indicate her parents had died. Did they go back out to India or elsewhere?

The older brothers Horace and Eustace and Ernest went to military schools:
1901: Ernest was at the Boys Royal Artillery Garrison in Dover, while Horace and Eustace were at the Duke of Yorks Military School in London

By 1911 Horace was an Acting Bombadier in Alvestoke.
So they were a very military family but I can't find any records which would indicate where Frederick and Ellen ended their days or even which battalion/unit my great grandfather was with.

Any ideas how I can find out? Kind regards, Sharon
Reply from: Alan Greveson
Date: Sunday 20th April 2014 at 1:25 PM

Dear Sharon,
It is unlikely any individual military record has survived that would identify Frederick's death as Victorian soldiers' records were generally destroyed after they died, unless they had qualified for a pension. He had apparently returned to the UK after a posting in India. The final year of an India posting was usually spent in Aden, which soldiers considered an unwelcome posting because it was so hot and boring. Aden was a coaling-station for vessels on the sea route through the Suez Canal to and from India and needed protecting but offered little in the way of quality of life for soldiers. It seems likely, then, that he died in the UK. As he had had a child born at Seaforth in 1893 and two sons in a military orphan school in 1901 (Royal Military Asylum for Children of Soldiers of the Regular Army, later Duke of York's Royal Military School) he probably died between 1893 and 1901.
To identify his death you would need to search the General Register Office Death indexes in the same manner as any other death before ordering the likely death certificates from the GRO. A possible death is in West Derby district, Lancashire, which covered Seaforth: Frederick Sadler, died July-Sept 1895, age 41, West Derby, Lancashire, Vol 8B page 408.
It would be necessary to establish whether his widow re-married before searching for her death as she could have had a different surname when she died. To order likely GRO death certificates (charges apply) See:
http://www.gro.gov.uk/gro/content/certificates/default.asp
The records of the Duke of York's School have generally survived and at one time were reproduced online, but no longer, to the best of my belief. See:
http://www.achart.ca/articles/york/history.html
and
http://www.doyrms.com/
Admission records for the school are kept at The National Archives (TNA), at Kew, in Catalogue series WO 143.
You might also be interested in:
http://www.archhistory.co.uk/taca/history.html
It is noted that the births of two boys named Frederick Sadler were registered in Rawlpindi in 1884 within the Royal Artillery. For GRO overseas and military birth, death and marriages indexes the "Findmypast.co.uk" website is useful, as is The Families in British India Society (FIBIS) website
www.fibis.org
With kind regards,
Alan
Posted by: Pauline {Email left}
Location: Liverpool
Date: Saturday 19th April 2014 at 10:35 AM
Hi alan looking for information William Connor 9507 Loyal North Lancashire Regiment. think he was with a machine gun regiment, and possibly awarded the D C M. any background information, think he may have been a relative, regards pauline.
Reply from: Alan Greveson
Date: Saturday 19th April 2014 at 6:43 PM

Dear Pauline,
William Connor served in the Loyal North Lancashire Regiment from 1908 to 1920. He served with the 2nd Battalion LNLR in India from 11th February 1910 until the outbreak of war in 1914 when the Battalion went to fight in East Africa. William was a corporal in the Battalion's machine gun company between 1915 and 1917. In July 1916 he was awarded the Distinguished Conduct Medal for "conspicuous gallantry when recovering a gun and driving off a superior force of the enemy".
The Battalion left Africa for Egypt in January 1917 and then went to France in May 1918. William returned to the UK in August 1918. He was discharged on 19th October 1920.
There is a website dedicated to the Great War in East Africa. See:
http://gweaa.com/

With kind regards,
Alan
Reply from: Pauline
Date: Sunday 20th April 2014 at 10:39 AM

Thank you so much, not sure if its the right william b 1891 liverpool, in 1901 he was in a childrens home in preston, suppose he could have joined as a boy, will have to keep on digging, thanks again pauline.
Reply from: Alan Greveson
Date: Sunday 20th April 2014 at 3:23 PM

Dear Pauline,
William Connor 9507 Loyal North Lancashire Regiment stated he was born in the parish Deptford, Kent. In October 1980 he stated he was aged 18 years and two months. On his discharge in 1920 he stated his was Reculver Road, Rotherhithe, London.
With kind regards,
Alan
Posted by: Gill Sykes {Email left}
Location: Burton On Trent
Date: Saturday 19th April 2014 at 9:05 AM
Have just found your website whilst researching my grandfather Nathaniel Priest He was Private with the K.O.Y.L.I. and wounded in either late 1916 or early 1917. We have a Xmas card from him from Albert 1916. Can you tell me what particular battles he may have been involved in at that time.On his discharge papers it says Specialist qualifications Chevron One "B" . Do you know what that means please?
Thankyou in anticipation of your help
Gill Sykes
Reply from: Alan Greveson
Date: Saturday 19th April 2014 at 6:44 PM

Dear Gill,
Unfortunately, no individual service record has survived for Nathaniel Priest and without knowing in which battalion of the KOYLI he served it is not possible to state his military service. He was awarded a silver War Badge for being wounded. The war badge roll stated he enlisted on 6th December 1915 and was discharged on 19th September 1919. The late date of discharge suggests he might still have been in hospital in 1919. He was discharged from the KOYLI Depot, and the depot was the unit which administered men's pay while they were in hospital. Nathanial Priest qualified for the British War Medal and the Victory Medal. The "specialist qualification" wasn't a specialist one as such: it was the qualification for one blue chevron, which was a badge named "chevron for overseas service". One chevron was given for each full year of overseas service and was worn on the right sleeve cuff.
With kind regards,
Alan
Reply from: Gill Sykes
Date: Sunday 20th April 2014 at 11:34 AM

Dear Alan,
Thank you very much for your help and for your very prompt reply. The Xmas card that I have that he sent from Albert says " 8th(Service)Bn. K.O.Y.L.I. in the Field." I have looked this up on the internet and the 8th Battalion was part of the 23rd Division that seems to have been involved in many of the individual battles of the Somme. Would that help please to discover his military service. I am guessing he would not be involved in all of the battles would he?Also it would seem that the 8th Battalion was formed at Pontefract. Does that mean Pontefract would be where he enlisted or would it have been his home town of Sheffield?
Thank you for offering such an informative service.
Best wishes
Gill
I have pictures of his hospital ward from October 1917 so it does appear he was in hospital for a long time.
Reply from: Alan Greveson
Date: Sunday 20th April 2014 at 3:17 PM

Dear Gill,
Nathaniel would have enlisted in his home town, Sheffield. The date was 6th December 1915, as shown on his War Badge roll. Most of the men who enlisted in December 1915 were men who had not yet volunteered and were persuaded to do so under the deferred-enlistment scheme, known as the Derby Scheme which had a closing date of December 15th 1915. After that, compulsory conscription was introduced in 1916. The men in the Derby Scheme were classified into groups. After registering their names they went home the same day and back to work. The groups were then called-up in sequence in 1916 and sent to join a regiment for training in a reserve battalion. Once trained the recruits would be posted to a particular battalion at the front. When Nathaniel enlisted in December 1915, the 8th Service Battalion KOYLI had long since left Pontefract and was already fighting in the 70th Infantry Brigade which was part of 23rd Division. "Service" battalions were those raised for the duration of the war only. Nathaniel would have joined the 8th Battalion sometime in the latter half of 1916 as part of a draft of reinforcements.
During any major engagement, one third of a large formation was Left Out of Battle (LOOB) to maintain a nucleus of the unit. In a set-piece engagement some men of the battalion would have remained in the rear, so individual soldiers did not necessarily fight in every engagement. For the engagements of the 23rd Division see:
http://www.1914-1918.net/23div.htm

The book "The King's Own Yorkshire Light Infantry in the Great War Volume III" by R C Bond will be useful in explaining the exact activities of the 8th Battalion KOYLI. It was written in 1929 but is still available as a re-print from the Naval and Military Press from £17.60 (Easter sale reduction from £22). See
http://www.naval-military-press.com/_search.php?page=1&q=%93The+King%92s+Own+Yorkshire+Light+Infantry+in+the+Great+War%94+by+R+C+Bond+

With kind regards,
Alan
Reply from: Gill Sykes
Date: Sunday 20th April 2014 at 3:55 PM

Dear Alan,
Thank you for all your help. It has been most useful.
Best wishes
Gill
Posted by: Gill Railton {Email left}
Location: Hull East Yorkshire
Date: Friday 18th April 2014 at 8:09 PM
Hello Alan
I am hoping you are able to help me again I am trying to find out something about my great granddads army service I have hit a bit of a brick wall
Charles Edward Fearey was born on 23rd August 1875 in Heckington, Lincolnshire. I had assumed that he was too old to have fought in WW1 but have a photo of him in uniform which appears to be the Army Service Corps, his family had horses and it was possible he took some of them over to France. I am hoping you are able to help.

Thank you
Gill Railton
Reply from: Alan Greveson
Date: Friday 18th April 2014 at 10:31 PM

Dear Gill,
There are no military records for Charles Fearey. As there is not an Army medal rolls index card in his name for the First World War it suggests that he had not served overseas. Being in uniform is not evidence of overseas service or regular army service: depending on the date of the photograph he might have been in the home-based militia or Territorials (does he look like a man of 40?). Any wartime service might have been in the UK only. (It would also be necessary to demonstrate the photograph is of him and not someone else.)
The Army purchased or commandeered horses during the war although individuals did not accompany them as the men themselves became volunteers or conscripts forming drafts of reinforcements to the ever-expanding Army Service Corps. In the 1901 and 1911 census Charles was shown as a carter, which, as the equivalent of today's "Pickford's Removals", would certainly have qualified him for service as a horse transport driver in the Army Service Corps.
One possible further source of information would be if he had applied for a pension after the First World War, a pension record card might have survived. The Western Front Association holds an archive of 6.5 million pension record cards (PRCs) which are not available elsewhere. They charge an administrative fee for a manual search of the records. See:
http://www.westernfrontassociation.com/about-the-wfa/175-pension-records/2961-pension-record-cards-manual-lookup-request.html

With kind regards,
Alan
Reply from: Gill Railton
Date: Friday 18th April 2014 at 10:59 PM

Hi Alan
Thank you for your help I will give the Western front Association a try
Best Wishes
Gill

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