Alan Greveson's World War 1 Forum (Page 89)

To contact someone on this forum, you must leave a Reply to that person's message asking them to use the Contact Editor link (bottom of each page) to grant permission to release their email to you. Then, contact me yourself with your Own Email address.

• To find your Own Messages search for the name you originally used.
• Direct questions to Alan via the Contact Editor link will be ignored. He is just too busy.
• If you appreciate Alan's free research please donate to his charity The British Legion

The forum has 264 pages containing 2634 messages
-10   Prev Page   85 86 87 88 89 90 91 92 93   Next Page   10+

Posted by: Jonboy {Email left}
Location: Harlow Essex
Date: Monday 17th December 2012 at 11:38 PM
Hi Alan
Lokking through some of my late Mothers paperwork and come across this one :
Henry James Bartlett Born 1884/5 Islington living at Stoke Newington
(i think thats what it reads as its fading now) when joined up.I can only
read Engineers think it might say Royal and the Service No is 69802.
can you please tell me if possible what he did.
Many thanks Alan
Jonboy
Reply from: Alan Greveson
Date: Tuesday 18th December 2012 at 5:29 PM

Dear Jonboy,
Henry J Bartlett volunteered to join the Royal Engineers in March 1915, travelled to Egypt, served at Gallipoli, suffered frostbite; was returned to England and then served in France and Flanders until the beginning of 1919.
Henry married Lilian Frances Yates at the Parish Church, Walthamstow, on April 20th 1906. In 1911 the couple lived at 74, Hawksley Road with Henry's mother, Annie, and her six other children. Henry and Lilian had a daughter Doris Winifred, born 28th July 1910 and a son, Henry James born 22 April 1913. In 1915 their address was 82 Hawksley Road.
Henry was a house decorator. At the age of 31, he enlisted at Shoreditch on the 15th March 1915 and joined the Royal Engineers as a skilled tradesman. He was 5ft 5ins tall, fair complexion with brown hair and brown eyes. He was passed through the RE Depot at Chatham and sent to No 5 Depot RE which was a training centre at Newark, Nottinghamshire. It was based at Coddington Hall where there were numerous training companies for the Engineers. The men were taught Field engineering including pontoon bridge building; and personal skills such as drill and musketry.
Once trained, on 21 September 1915 Henry was posted to the 72nd Field Company RE which was already serving with 13th Division at Gallipoli. He travelled via Egypt and Mudros to Suvla Bay, arriving on 12th October 1915. On 7th November 1915 he was treated at Hill 10 Hospital (32nd Field Ambulance) at Suvla Bay for tonsillitis. In December he suffered frostbite (the weather was notoriously appalling with snow and flooded trenches). On December 3rd 1915 he was sent from Gallipoli to Mudros, and from there to England where he arrived at Netley Hospital on 3rd January 1916. He was treated for 33 days and then was then sent to France on 28th June 1916. On Juuly 7th 1916 he joined 129th Field Company RE which was serving on the Somme with 24th Division. They were at Delville Wood from 15th July to September 3rd; Guillemont to 6th September; and Ginchy from 9th September 1916. In Spring 1917 they moved north to Vimy (April); Messines (June) and Pilckem (31 July to 2nd Aug) then Langemarck (16th 18th August). From 7th to 25th November 1917 he was granted leave to the UK.
In the Spring of 1918 they were back on the Somme and became caught in the German spring offensive at St Quentin (21 to 23 March 1918).
On 24th March 1918 he was at a RE Base Depot at Rouen where he was medically re-graded as B1. On 8th December 1918 he was posted from the base depot to 135 Army Troops Company RE. He was granted two weeks' UK leave at Christmas 1918 and returned to France for just a few days before he finally embarked for England on 17th January 1919. He was discharged from the RE at Shorncliffe garrison on the Kent coast on 15th February 1919.
Henry qualified for the 1914-15 Star, the British War Medal and the Victory Medal.
Kind regards,
Alan
Posted by: Lizzie {Email left}
Location: Retford
Date: Monday 17th December 2012 at 8:03 PM
Hello Alan, I am trying to research the war details of Trevor John Holliday. His death certificate states he was a Gunner in 281 Brigade RFA, No. 140562, age 27, killed in action on 21/2/1918 in France. The medal index card shows same details except that his brigade appears to be RFA/262 B. Page 32387. He got the Victory and British Medals. When I looked at CWWG it stated he was in 261 brigade but having contacted them they agreed they had misread 281 for 261 & were going to change it. He is buried in Roclincourt military cemetery. Is it possible to discover where and how he died & why he was in 2 different brigades. In the newspaper obit. it stated he was killed "with his officer" but no more than that. It would be nice to know a bit more about what he did before he was killed or at least where he was killed. He was married with a small girl so I don't think he went to France before 1916. Many thanks. Lizzie
Reply from: Alan Greveson
Date: Tuesday 18th December 2012 at 5:28 PM

Dear Lizzie,
No individual service record has survived for Trevor Holliday so it is not possible to suggest his wartime service.
Gunner Holliday's medal rolls index card does not record a brigade of the RFA. It is an index card for the medal roll which was numbered 262B on which his name is entered on page 32387. The medal roll is held at the UK National Archives in Catalogue reference WO 329/143 "Royal Field Artillery other ranks: medal rolls RFA/261B; RFA/262B. Pages 32223-32524; British War Medal and Victory Medal." The BW & V medal roll would be a typed list which generally provided no information additional to that shown on the index card that referred to the roll itself.
As gunner Holliday did not qualify for the 1914-15 Star, he did not serve overseas until some occasion after January 1st 1916. The only evidence for his service is that on the day he was killed he was serving with 281 Brigade RFA. That brigade had started the war as the pre-war Territorial Force's 2nd London Brigade RFA, although Trevor may probably not have been a member of it. All the men of the Territorial Force were allotted new regimental numbers in March 1917 and the 1st/2nd London Brigade RFA was allotted numbers in the range 930001 to 935000.
As gunner Holliday was numbered 140562, he was apparently not an original pre-war member of 281 Brigade. It seems he may have been a 1916 conscript who was allotted his regimental number on general enlistment and then posted to 281 Brigade after completing his basic training. Many soldiers served in more than one battery or brigade throughout the course of the war and many batteries were re-titled, or brigades designated to different army formations, which makes the tracing of Royal Artillery units quite complicated.
281 Brigade RFA was formed from the 4th, 5th and 6th County of London Batteries of the Royal Field Artillery (Territorial Force). The 4th, 5th and 6th County of London Batteries existed at Woolwich and Eltham before the war as units of part-time volunteers (the Territorials). At the outbreak of war they were part of the 2nd London Brigade of the RFA in the Army's 1st London Division in the UK. That Division was then broken up in 1915. The 2nd London Brigade RFA then served with 36th Division in France until 12th May 1916.
When the TF was enlarged after the outbreak of war the 2nd London Brigade RFA took the fractional title of 1st/2nd London Brigade to distinguish it from the newly-raised, wartime, 2nd/2nd London Brigade.
In May 1916, a new 56th (1st London) Division was created in France from units of the Territorial Force and the Division's guns were those of the 1st/2nd London Brigade RFA. At the same time, the Brigade was re-numbered as CCLXXXI Brigade RFA (281 Brigade RFA) as part of 56th (1st London) Division. For the Division's record, see:
http://www.1914-1918.net/56div.htm

The date on which Trevor Holliday died was not the date of a major engagement of the war. Guns were constantly the targets of the enemy's artillery and many gunners were killed in artillery duels known as counter-battery fire. The war diary of 281 Brigade RFA is held at the UK National Archives at Kew. It is in catalogue reference WO 95/2940/3. It can be viewed at Kew.
Kind regards,
Alan
Reply from: Lizzie
Date: Tuesday 18th December 2012 at 8:28 PM

Dear Alan

Many thanks for your very informative reply, my head is now buzzing with 1st/2nd and 2nd/2nd etc.! Do you know whether it is possible for the National Archives to copy parts of the Diary for 281 Brigade, or would it be impossible?

Lizzie
Reply from: Alan Greveson
Date: Tuesday 18th December 2012 at 9:26 PM

Dear Lizzie,
The short answer is "no". Unit war diaries can be very large documents running to hundreds of pages and The National Archives has, so far, made available only four per-cent of their collection of war diaries to download online. The National Archives (TNA) is presently in the process of conserving and preparing for digital imagery their whole collection of unit war diaries from 1914-1920 and during this autumn some diaries have been unavailable to view at Kew while they have undergone the process. The latest batch is due back at the archives on January 30th 2013 but no date has been offered for when the diaries will go online. I suspect a fanfare will be sounded nearer 2014.
TNA currently has a policy of not providing quotations for copying parts of war diaries as the free quotation service is not a research service. TNA says:- "The record copying quotation service is not a free search or research service. This means that we cannot provide quotations if it would be necessary to search through a document to find specific pieces of information. We are therefore unable to search. WO 95".
Studying a war diary for certain dates is considered to be paid-for research which has to be paid for as a "level 3 search" which currently carries a standard charge of £60 (60 GBP) for a single month in a unit diary (on average 4 pages) or five dated events and then £40 for each additional month or five dated events. "Independently located document references for a unit's war diaries [may incur] a paid search charge for locating a required date period within the diaries and "marking it up" ready for copying. This will usually be in addition to the copying fee. The standard charge for "marking up" research is £60 per document reference".
The cost of the downloadable war diaries is GBP 3-36 for at least one war diary, covering all or part of the war, and often more than one in the same download. So it would be worth waiting, financially at least, for the war diaries to go online.
Alternatively, you could seek the help of an independent researcher near Kew. See:
http://nationalarchives.gov.uk/records/paid_research.htm

Kind regards,
Alan
Reply from: Lizzie
Date: Wednesday 19th December 2012 at 4:02 PM

Dear Alan
Thank you very much for going into the intricacies of the War Diaries at the National Archives. I will wait and see if they go online.

Lizzie
Posted by: Victor Fazzini {Email left}
Location: New Zealand
Date: Sunday 16th December 2012 at 11:26 PM
Hello Alan,

I would be most appreciative if you could supply me with information regarding my father's Army Record in the British Army. His name was Giovanni Fazzini (an Italian national) and served in A Company 6th. Battalion the Green Howards as a Lewis gunner in North Russia during 1918/19. His regiment number was 48557 and I believe that he was a Corporal while in Russia. Any additional details would be most appreciated. Thank you.
Reply from: Alan Greveson
Date: Monday 17th December 2012 at 7:36 PM

Dear Victor,
Unfortunately, no individual service record has survived for Giovanni Fazzini so it is not possible to relate his wartime service. The Green Howards Museum holds material related to the North Russia expedition. See:
http://www.greenhowards.org.uk/

Kind regards,
Alan
Reply from: Victor Fazzini
Date: Monday 17th December 2012 at 11:34 PM

Hello again Alan,

Thank you for the prompt reply. I presume that my father's records were destroyed in the London bombing, so I will take your advice and contact The Green Howards Museum to see if they can provide additional information to what I already know.

Thank you once again.

Victor Fazzini.
Posted by: Jane
Location: Deeping St James
Date: Sunday 16th December 2012 at 12:59 PM
Hello Alan

Advice/help needed if possible! I am researching the grandfather of a friend of mine and we have ascertained that he was Captain George Walker who served during WW1 with the RAMC. He was born in 1868 in Wymeswold, Leicestershire, although his address at the time of his serving would have been 35 Wood Vale, Forest Hill, London. Any help much appreciated Alan.
Many thanks
Jane
Reply from: Alan Greveson
Date: Sunday 16th December 2012 at 5:56 PM

Dear Jane,
This is the same George Walker discussed a month ago, in which case the belief he was at sea provides a clue. There was more than one George or G. Walker who served as an officer in the RAMC but one was a George Charles Walker and the other a G B Walker. So from the medal index cards there appears to be only one Captain George Walker of the RAMC. He may have been the Captain George Walker who had an address at 7 Essex Grove, Upper Norwood, London SE 19, on July 20th 1924 when he applied for his campaign medals. This was in a similar area to where he had lived in 1911 and is also relatively close to Croydon. The address was marked on his medal index card which also showed he had served on the Hospital Ship Aquitania from 3rd September 1915.
The Aquitania was a Cunard liner that was converted first to a troop ship and then in late 1915 she was converted into a hospital ship capable of carrying 4,200 men. She was used as a hospital ship only until 10th April 1916. If this were the same man, it might account for the earlier belief that he was a surgeon in the Navy, although there is no evidence that all his wartime service was on hospital ships.
RAMC Officers' service records are held at the National Archives at Kew. To identify a particular George Walker you would need to download and study the Walker name index and then order a copy of his service record. See the instructions at:
http://www.nationalarchives.gov.uk/records/looking-for-person/officerbritisharmyafter1913.htm

He does not appear to be included in the surname index as George Walker. However, there is a G Walker who was a Captain and who had a "special enlistment". A doctor could have had a special enlistment, one type of which provided for a civilian to undertake his profession in uniform. The former file reference was "wa/1922" indicating the file is held in catalogue series WO 374.
It can be very difficult to identify an individual from the index and the most authoritative method would be to visit Kew and call up the likely individual files to inspect them for positive identification from personal details.

Kind regards,
Alan
Posted by: Jonboy {Email left}
Location: Harlow Essex
Date: Friday 14th December 2012 at 4:41 PM
Hi Alan
My Son has a War Medal which belonged to my late Mother, Margerette Joy Nicholls (Nee"Bartlett) B 1925 Brentford
married to Alfred Percy Nicholls B1920 Brentford. the Medal reads "The Great War For Civilisation" 1914-1919.
It Reads on the Edge of Medal GS-20485 Pte W.Nicholls R Fus.
Cant seem to place him on my tree accept a William Nicholls 1836 and he would be to old for that War.He is
obviously a Relation to my Dad somewhere but its difficult to know how to i have looked on the Census that i have
but cant find him.Could you help please.
Regards
Jonboy
Reply from: Alan Greveson
Date: Saturday 15th December 2012 at 7:49 PM

Dear Jonboy,
There is no military record that has biographical information for W Nicholls other than a medal card which showed he was named William Nicholls, and was fusilier 20485 Royal Fusiliers, who qualified for the British War Medal and the Victory Medal. He appears to have survived the war as he is not listed among the war dead.
Kind regards,
Alan
Reply from: Jonboy
Date: Saturday 15th December 2012 at 8:01 PM

Hi Alan
Thanks for that i still havent got a clue who he is in the Family.I know he belongs to our Family otherwise my Mother
would not have had the Medal,still,as my dad used to say",wheres theres a will theres a way"
Regards
Jonboy.
Posted by: Kate
Location: Bradford
Date: Friday 14th December 2012 at 3:21 PM
Hello Alan
I would be most grateful if you could supply any additional service information on Leiutenant Evelyn Henry Lintott (born November 1883) a former professional footballer and school teacher, who was killed on the first day of the Battle of the Somme. The Wikipedia and Spartacus web-sites, and others, offer biographies of him but there is very little about his service record. It would be wonderful to uncover more of his journey from 1914, when he enlisted, to July 1st 1916. It seems inititally he was with a footballers battalion but more latterly with the West Yorkshire Regiment 15th battalion. He had been living in Bradford for many years (and played for City) before the war.
Any help on further discovering his story would be so appreciated.
Kate
Reply from: Alan Greveson
Date: Friday 14th December 2012 at 4:04 PM

Dear Kate,
Officer's service records from the First World War are held at the National Archives at Kew. You can visit Kew or order a copy online (charges apply). The record for Lt E H Lintott is Catalogue item WO339/18413
See:
http://www.nationalarchives.gov.uk/catalogue/displaycataloguedetails.asp?CATID=1600721&CATLN=6&Highlight=%2CLINTOTT&accessmethod=0

Kind regards,
Alan
Reply from: Kate
Date: Friday 14th December 2012 at 7:47 PM

Thanks, Alan. I did not know that these records were held at the National Archives and I am grateful that you have pointed me in the right direction. Thanks, again
Posted by: Jonboy {Email left}
Location: Harlow Essex
Date: Thursday 13th December 2012 at 10:46 PM
Hi Alan
Can you help us on a William Simpson Shields Born 1892 Newcastle.Driver in the Royal Field Artillary
based in Newcastle.Reg No 107154 ? Poss spent 6 Months in Barrack prison for AWOL.Thats the
only info i have im afraid hope you can help.
Regards
Jonboy
Reply from: Alan Greveson
Date: Saturday 15th December 2012 at 7:47 PM

Dear Jonboy,
There is no surviving record for William Simpson Shields in the Royal Artillery. However, in August 1919 he tried to re-enlist for a year's service in the Royal Army Medical Corps. He was discharged a week later as unlikely to become an efficient soldier. He was medically graded B2 fit for service in garrisons and was "slightly deaf". He stated he had served as 107154 Royal Horse and Field Artillery between 2 September 1915 and 21 January 1919. There is no medal index card for this man although there is a card for a William J Shields 107155 Royal Field Artillery who qualified for the British War Medal and the Victory Medal.
Kind regards,
Alan
Posted by: Jonboy {Email left}
Location: Harlow Essex
Date: Thursday 13th December 2012 at 4:53 PM
Hi Alan
Can you help on a Robert Harper Born approx 1770 joined the Kilkenny Miltia in 1805 in Strabane Co Tyrone.He was living
in Aghavea Co Fermanagh.He was a Married to Elizabeth Duncan date unknown.He was a Seargent in the Kilkenny Miltia.
He was Discharged in 1885 we dont know where he was Based or who his parents were or where he fought could you
help in any way on this please.
Jonboy
Reply from: Alan Greveson
Date: Thursday 13th December 2012 at 7:49 PM

Dear Jonboy,
I do not have access to the few surviving records from that period.
Service in the militia was part-time for local defence duties and was by annual ballot of the local male population where men were "drawn" to join the militia for a year if there were insufficient volunteers to keep the local company up to strength. Militia companies could have a full-time sergeant, so it is possible that Robert Harper served in a full-time capacity. Alternatively, part-time militia men could choose to enlist for full-time service and serve with another regiment in the regular army. However, if he was 35 when he enlisted he was comparatively old, as the Army considered men to be "worn out" (their term) at the age of 40. Militia ballots selected from men aged between 18 and 45. The Kilkenny Militia would have had companies to serve in Kilkenny City and in Kilkenny County serving as the Kilkenny Militia or Kilkenny Regiment. The Colonel was the Marquis of Ormonde. The regiment was based in Kilkenny. During the Napoleonic Wars the Militia was mobilized at various times so their local defence role came to an end and they could serve the Crown anywhere, including garrisons in England where they marched from town to town depending on the need for local or coastal defence during invasion scares. In June 1813 brawling members of the Kilkenny Militia were involved in street fighting with local residents while based at Nottingham.
The list of baptisms at Weeley Barracks near Colchester in Essex has a Jane Harper baptised on 29th April 1814 to Robert and Elizabeth Harper (Serg in Kilkenny Militia). See:
http://helvissa.com/parishrecords/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=102%3Aweeley-baptisms-1814&catid=35%3Abaptisms&Itemid=53

His discharge would not have been in 1885 as that would have made him 115 years old (!) I would guess if he had been full-time and joined in 1805 he could have put in 21 years' service which was considered the total for a pension.
Kind regards,
Alan
Reply from: Joinboy
Date: Thursday 13th December 2012 at 7:58 PM

Hi Alan
Many thanks for that i had a feeling that would be a difficult one.
regards
Jonboy
Reply from: Farmer
Date: Thursday 1st January 2015 at 1:44 AM

Robert Harper was born in 1779 Joined the Kilkenny Militia in 1805 in Strabane and was discharged in 1825 and settled in a farm in Coon Co Kilkenny He raised a large family who all but one (who stayed on the home farm) emigrated to Ontario.
His son Robert who remained at home had two sons, Robert and Edward who was my great Grandfather.
Robert rose to the rank of Sargent in the Kilkenny militia and the reason for his discharge was given as "varicose veins"
His father was most likely Edward Harper and his Grandfather Robert both of Aghavea.
There is quite a bit more detail available but this gives a flavor of his story
Me
Posted by: Gsdean {Email left}
Location: Leeds
Date: Thursday 13th December 2012 at 12:48 PM
Hi Alan

Could you add detail to my great uncles experience.
Charles Smith - Born Leeds 1885
Died 6/5/1915
1/8 Battalion Prince of Wales / Leeds Rifles.(2365)
Buried Ploegsteert

Many Thanks
Reply from: Alan Greveson
Date: Thursday 13th December 2012 at 6:05 PM

Rifleman Charles Smith 2365 of the Prince of Wales's Own (West Yorkshire Regiment) arrived in France on 16th April 1915 with the 8th Battalion (Leeds Rifles). He died 20 days later. The Battalion served with the 1st West Riding Brigade and was mobilised at Carlton Barracks, Leeds on 4th August 1914. On 10th August it moved to Selby and at the end of the month to Strensall, near York. At the end of October it returned to York for the winter. About March 1915, the Battalion moved to Gainsborough. On 1st April 1915 the West Riding Division granted men four days' leave before going abroad, but this was cut down to just two days. The Battalion raised a sister battalion in Leeds at the outbreak of war, to provide drafts of replacements. This became known as the 2nd/8th Battalion so the original 8th Battalion took the fractional title the 1st/8th battalion. The 1/8th Battalion left Gainsborough in two trains after 5 p.m. on August 15th, travelling to Folkestone where they embarked for France and Flanders, landing at Boulogne at 2 a.m. on 16th April 1915. At 11.45 p.m. they marched to Pont Debrique where they entrained for Merville at 2.30 a.m. on the 17th. They remained in billets at Merville until April 22nd and spent 24 hours at a time with the Bedfordshire Regiment at Fauquissart becoming familiar with trench routine. Between the 22nd and 2nd May the 1/8th Battalion was in billets at La Gorgue, again spending 24 hours at a time in the trenches. Francis Edwin Almond was the first man of the battalion to die when he was killed on the night of April 30th/ May 1st 1915 at La Gorgue. The trench he was in for 24 hours' training came under shell-fire and the men could not be relieved, nor could rations be got up to them.

On May 2nd the Battalion marched from La Gorgue to Bac St Maur, near Sailly and Armentieres. The Battalion moved into billets at Bac St Maur until May 5th. On May 5th they left Bac St Maur. Their transport was left near Estaires and half the battalion (C and D Companies and the machine gun section) went into the trenches for the first time under their own command at "Cameron Lane" trench which was in the line south of Lavantie between Lavantie and Neuve Chapelle facing the Aubers Ridge.

The trench positions were cut at right-angles by the Estaires to La Bassée road and the Sailly to Fromelles road. There were numerous small lanes and tracks as well as drainage ditches that lay behind the lines and led out into no-man's land. The Rue du Bois, from Bethune met the Estaires road at a junction called Port Arthur which was an important feature in the British line. The road then continued north through Neuve Chapelle, towards Armentières. The British held the line as far south as La Bassee after which it was held by the French.

The French and the British planned a joint attack in Artois with the tactical objective of seizing the enemy-held the heights at Vimy Ridge. The British would attack at Aubers. On 2nd May, it was decided the attack would take place on 7th May but heavy rain on 6th May and fog on 7th May caused a French postponement of the main attack until May 9th.

Charles was killed on May 6th 1915, the second man of the Battalion to be killed in the trenches. He had been in the line for 24 hours after the Battalion's first day of facing the enemy. The war diary notes: "C and D companies and MG Sect in trenches. One man killed". This was at Cameron Lane.

He was killed in action, probably as a result of the day to day sniping and shelling of the front line as there was no set-piece engagement that day.

Charles would have been buried locally, but the grave would have been destroyed or lost as the war progressed and Charles is now commemorated on the Ploegsteert Memorial to the 11,000 men who died in this area and now have no marked grave. The Ploegsteert Memorial stands in Berks Cemetery Extension, which is located 12.5 kms south of Ieper, on the N365.
Kind regards,
Alan
Reply from: Gsdean
Date: Friday 14th December 2012 at 8:56 AM

Thank you very much for your help, this fills in many blanks in our family history.
Sadly Charles had a younger brother who also lost his life, could you shed any light on his experience.
Walter Smith - Royal Field Artillery (881922)
Born - Leeds, 1887.
Died - 05/12/1917 and buried at Dozinghem .
Many Thanks
Gary Dean
Reply from: Alan Greveson
Date: Friday 14th December 2012 at 5:49 PM

Dear Gary,
Unfortunately, no individual service record appears to have survived for Walter Smith 881922 RFA, so it is not possible to suggest his wartime service. When he was killed in December 1917 he was serving with 28 Brigade RFA which was an Army Brigade that was with Second Army in 1918. Walter qualified for the British War Medal and the Victory Medal, a fact that indicated he did not serve abroad until some date after January 1st 1916.
Kind regards,
Alan
Reply from: Gsdean
Date: Saturday 15th December 2012 at 1:14 PM

Many thanks Alan for all your help.
Regards
Gary Dean
Posted by: Elaine {Email left}
Location: Northampton
Date: Wednesday 12th December 2012 at 9:11 PM
Hi, I am trying to find out about my grandfather's time in the Army Service Corps, but am having difficulty getting any details. His name was James Scott, and he was born 2 August 1888 at Falkland Wood, Falkland, Fife. According to his medal roll he arrived in France on 23 December 1914 as a private in the ASC, Motor Transport Division. His regimental number was M2/019688. I don't understand some of the info on the medal roll card. For example, next to the Victory medal it says RASC (I get that) 10T B14. Next to the Star it says RASC 7BI. He seems to have been demobbed on 27 May, 1919. What I find interesting is that he got married on 10 July, 1917, and he gives his occupation as a chauffeur in the British Expeditionary Force. I can't find out anything more though. Any pointers gratefully received.
Reply from: Alan Greveson
Date: Thursday 13th December 2012 at 6:06 PM

Dear Elaine,
The references on the medal index card indicate the number of the actual medal roll which recorded the soldier's qualification for his medals. The 1914-15 Star roll was numbered RASC 7 B1 page 52. That actual roll is held at the National Archives at Kew in Catalogue reference WO329/2894 ("Royal Army Service Corps other ranks: medal rolls. RASC/6B21-6B48 (pages 5742B-5913B); RASC/7B-7B2 (pages 1B-169B) 1914-15 Star"). The roll for the 1914-15 Star might show with which unit he went abroad. The rolls for the Victory and British War Medals are less likely to show any additional information.
However, even if the number of the ASC Company he was with is known, there is less likely to be a record of his actual work, other than the fact he was a motor driver. The army's staff officers did not have "chauffeurs"; they had "drivers", but his own description of his job as a "chauffeur" is useful as it suggests that that was what he was doing in 1917 when he married. Members of the ASC found it easier to get leave to the UK as they were non-combatant.
At the outbreak of the war the ASC had only 115 motor vehicles, so there were few MT drivers (Mechanical Transport drivers) with many vehicles, such as buses and lorries, being commandeered sometimes with their drivers behind the wheel. By 1918 the ASC had 121,702 motor vehicles. While some drivers worked within MT Companies delivering the materiel of war, many were attached to other units for special driving duties or to such duties as ambulance convoys.
Details of his service would probably come from private family sources.
Kind regards,
Alan

The forum has 264 pages containing 2634 messages
-10   Prev Page   85 86 87 88 89 90 91 92 93   Next Page   10+

Don't forget to BOOKMARK this page to your FAVORITES.