Alan Greveson's World War 1 Forum (Page 41)

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Posted by: David Howells {Email left}
Location: Sydney Austrailia
Date: Monday 16th December 2013 at 2:30 AM
Dear Alan,Once again i am seeking info on the welsh regt ww1,can you tell me what the regimental no was for the welsh regt that served in india bettween 1919 and 1921 Many thanks David
Reply from: Alan Greveson
Date: Monday 16th December 2013 at 11:27 AM

Dear David,
It was the 1st Battalion that returned to India in 1919 until 1924. They fought at the Operations against the Waziris and Mahsuds, on the North West Frontier between 1921 and 1924.
With kind regards,
Alan
Reply from: Alan Greveson
Date: Monday 16th December 2013 at 10:54 PM

The Operations were not continual and covered a period when the permanent roads were built on the NWF.
Posted by: Marion {Email left}
Location: Boston Ma Usa
Date: Sunday 15th December 2013 at 1:00 PM
Dear Alan,

I have been researching my Newry relatives and stumbled upon your very informative website. I wonder if you're able to help me with any information on my great uncle, Emmet Curtis Davenport, 8272, 2nd Bn., Royal Inniskilling Fusiliers, who was killed in actionon 16 May 1915.

I do know he is remembered at the Le Touret Memorial. He also left a widow, Margaret. I am planning a July 2014 trip to the battlefields of France and Belgium and hope to pay my respects at the memorial. His brother, my great uncle Davd Davenport (who served with the Royal Irish Rifles, is also memorialized there. He was killed in action only a two months earlier on 10 March.

Any information you can provide that wil help me learn more about his service would be most appreciated.

Many thanks,
Marion
Reply from: Alan Greveson
Date: Sunday 15th December 2013 at 6:13 PM

Dear Marion,
No individual wartime service record has survived for Emmet Davenport so it is not possible to be certain about his wartime service. However, sufficient evidence has survived to draw conclusions from records which describe him variously as Ernest or Emmet Davenport or Devonport.
The birth of Emmet Curtis Davenport was registered at Newry, Co. Down, in the autumn of 1884. He was probably the son of David and Margaret Davenport. David was a mason's labourer and the family lived at 21 King Street, Newry, at the time of the 1901 census of Ireland when Emmet was recorded as a 17-year-old, employed as a carder in a factory (textile mill). The name was indexed as "Ernet C. Davenport".
The 1911 England census recorded Emmet Devonport (sic) as a private soldier in the 1st Battalion Royal Inniskilling Fusiliers, aged 24; born Newry. There was a discrepancy in his age, which would actually have been 27 had he been born in 1884. This discrepancy appears to have been caused by stating he was aged 18 in 1905 when he enlisted in the Army. He would, in fact, have been 21 when he enlisted. (See below).
In the pre-war years, each Regiment had two regular army (full-time) battalions that alternated between overseas and home service. Soldiers could be posted between the two battalions, so it is not surprising that Emmet Davenport was initially with the 1st Battalion.
In 1911, the 1st Battalion Royal Inniskilling Fusiliers was stationed at Tientsin in northern China. It had served on garrison duties in Ireland from 1902 to 1907 when it moved to garrison duties at Crete and Malta until 1909 when it moved to China. The British Army's duties were to guard the British interests in Peking and Tientsin in the aftermath of the Boxer Rebellion. See:
http://www.royal-irish.com/stories/inniskillings-china
In 1913, the 1st Battalion sailed for India while the 2nd Battalion was garrisoned in England. Probably about the time of the 1st Battalion moving to India, Emmet would have joined the 2nd Battalion in England. The 2nd Battalion was stationed at Dover when war was declared in August 1914. The Battalion spent 10 days in Norfolk, between 8th and 18th August 1914, forming-up with the 12th Infantry Brigade in the 4th Division. They sailed across the Channel on the night of 22nd/23rd August 1914, landing at Le Havre. They then fought at The Battle of Le Cateau where the 4th Division was actually incomplete and fought without its service corps such as the Engineers and Medical Corps (26 August - 1 September 1914); The Battle of the Marne (6 - 12 September 1914); The Battle of the Aisne (12 - 28 September 1914); and The Battle of Messines 1914 (12 October-2 November 1914).
In the months of December 1914 and January 1915 the 2nd Battalion Royal Inniskilling Fusiliers were occupied as GHQ Troops at the disposal of General Headquarters British Expeditionary Force at St Omer. On 26th January 1915 the 2nd Battalion was moved to join the 5th Infantry Brigade in the 2nd Division during the Winter Operations around the villages of Givenchy and Cuinchy. One of the local landmarks was the Aubers Ridge which was the higher-ground occupied by and dominated by the enemy. After failed attacks on the ridge, the 2nd Battalion took part in The Battle of Festubert which was launched on 15th May 1915 and continued for ten days. Emmet Davenport was recorded as "killed in action" on May 16th 1915.
An Army medal rolls index-card for Emmet Davenport recorded he was "deceased". An Army Medal Rolls index-card in the name of Ernest (sic) Davenport recorded he was "presumed dead".
This meant that he was missing and never returned. The War Office used the expression "presumed dead" if there was evidence of action that might lead to death (e.g. there was evidence he took part in an attack and was never seen again). To 'presume' was a deduction or conclusion based on probability from previously known facts. There are some notes on the battle at:
http://www.remembrancetrails-northernfrance.com/learn-more/battles/the-battle-of-festubert-15-27-may-1915.html
Emmet Davenport has no identified grave and is commemorated on the addendum (supplementary) panel of Le Touret Memorial in the Le Touret Military Cemetery, on the south side of the Bethune-Armentieres road.
Emmet Davenport qualified for the 1914 Star with Mons clasp; The British War Medal and the Victory Medal. His death was recorded by the English General Register Office as Ernest (sic) Davenport (Army War Deaths 1914 1921 vol 1.7 page 111).
Militia attestation papers from the Royal Irish Rifles for an Emmet Davenport, aged 18, of Newry, dated 1905, are held at the UK National Archives at Kew in Catalogue series WO96. Many young men joined the part-time Militia to see if they were suited to the Army life before enlisting in the full-time Army. If they transferred from the Militia to the full time Army they received a cash bounty, so there was also a financial incentive to join the Militia first. These documents are available to download from the Findmypast.co.uk website on a pay-as-you-go basis. Thirty credits are needed to view the documents. I am not able to transcribe them as that would be a breach of copyright.
I believe the brother who was killed would have been Robert Davenport, not David. A Robert Davenport of Newry served in the 1st Battalion Royal Irish Rifles and was killed on 10th March 1915 which would have been at The Battle of Neuve Chapelle (1013 March 1915). He is commemorated on panels 42 and 43 on Le Touret Memorial.
With kind regards,
Alan
Reply from: Marion
Date: Monday 16th December 2013 at 12:57 AM

Dear Alan, 

Thank you so much for this incredible amount of  meaningful  information! With the info you have provided, I can pull out my map and actually pinpoint the the locations and follow in Emmet's footsteps. I will be in London after my trip to France and will now plan on a visit to the National Archives to research further. If you can share any insight on how to make the most of my time there, I, again, will be most appreciative.

I realized when you mentioned it, that I inadvertently wrote 'David' instead of 'Robert'. There were actually five Davenport brothers; Joseph H (b 1870), David (b abt 1882), Samuel (b 1889), Emmet and Robert (b 1887). I don't know if the other three brothers served in the war. If you can pass along additional information on Robert, or any of the other brothers, I will be eternally grateful.

With gratitude,
Marion
Reply from: Alan Greveson
Date: Monday 16th December 2013 at 9:50 PM

Dear Marion,
Robert Davenport enlisted in the Army in 1905, but some months later than Emmet. He joined the Royal Irish Rifles which was descended from the 86th (Royal County of Down) Regiment of Foot. Robert served with the 1st Battalion which was garrisoned overseas in Natal and then India. In the 1911 census he was recorded as a 23 year old rifleman with the 1st Battalion Royal Irish Rifles in Alexandra Barracks, Maymyo, in Burma. Private soldiers in rifle regiments are addressed as "rifleman". In 1914 the Battalion moved to Aden where a British garrison was kept to protect the harbour and British interests there. Aden was a coaling station for ships travelling through the Suez Canal en route to and from India and Australia. Because of the monotony and the heat Aden was considered an unpleasant posting and was restricted to one year at the end of a few years' duties in India. At the outbreak of war, part-time Territorial soldiers were sent to Aden to permit the regular army troops to return to the UK and the 1st Battalion Royal Irish Rifles set sail on 27th September 1914, arriving at Liverpool, England, on 22nd October 1914. They joined the 25th Infantry Brigade in the 8th Division at Hursley Park, Winchester. On 6th November 1914, the Battalion landed in France and moved by train to the village of Laventie, in the Nord Pas-de-Calais area. There, the battalion went into the routine of winter trench-warfare of spending a few days in the trenches alternated with a few days in billets in the villages to the rear. The front line was two thousand yards West of the village of Fauquissart. The Battalion took part in the first attack at Neuve Chapelle on December 18th in which the German front line was captured briefly but any gains they had made were lost by December 24th. On December 24th the enemy offered a truce for Christmas Day and the 1st Battalion did fraternised and take part in the truce, with some of the riflemen going forward to talk with the enemy.
In 1915 the Battalion prepared for what was to be the first large scale British attack of the war at Neuve Chapelle. The battle started on March 10th 1915, the day Rifleman Davenport was killed. See:
http://www.1914-1918.net/bat9.htm
Robert Davenport qualified for the 1914 Star with Mons clasp; the British War Medal and the Victory Medal. He has no identified grave and is commemorated on Le Touret Memorial on panels 42 and 43.
Most First World War records were destroyed in the bombing of London in 1940 when the war Office repository was destroyed by fire on September 8th 1940. Because so few records with biographical details have survived from the First World War it has not been possible to identify the other brothers in military records. Joseph would have been at the upper age limit for war service by 1914 and might not have served, but the other brothers David and Samuel could have volunteered. There was no compulsory service for Irish men so they would have been volunteers had they served. As for visiting the National Archives, I suggest that you decide what you want to look for before you go, otherwise your searches would be like spilling a bag of Maltesers. You will need to regsiter for a reader's ticket if you wish to see original documents, rather than microfilm. Registering takes a few minutes but you'll need proofs of identity and address. You may wish to see Robert and Emmets early enlistment papers in WO96, but they are available to download, in colour, from Findmypast.co.uk for a small charge. The regimental war diaries for 1st battalion Royal Irish Rifles are available to download online for about five dollars at
http://discovery.nationalarchives.gov.uk/SearchUI/Details?uri=C7352501
The diaries of the 2nd Battalion Royal inniskilling Fusiliers are in two parts. Part 1 (1914) is available at:
http://discovery.nationalarchives.gov.uk/SearchUI/Details?uri=C7352170
But the 1915 diary is not available online. It is in Catalogure reference WO 95/1350/1. That is where you might start. Take a digital camera as it is cheaper to photograph pages than to have them reproduced.
See:
http://www.nationalarchives.gov.uk/visit/
and
http://www.nationalarchives.gov.uk/documents/photopolicy.pdf

With kind regards,
Alan
Reply from: Marion
Date: Tuesday 17th December 2013 at 3:06 PM

Dear Alan,

Thank you so much for your time, knowledge and insight. This has been an extraordinary journey for me and your assistance has brought me even farther along. Not long ago, I was in place of no knowledge or understanding of my uncles and their family. Now I have the ability to trace their movements and attempt to imagine, as best I can, what their lives were like. I can also empathize with my great great-grandparents, whose grief, like millions of other parents, must have been intolerable. One day, I hope to be lucky enough to find a photo of one or both of the Davenports. That happened to me here in the States when I was researching my great uncle, Guido Cicconi, who fought with the AEF (and who was also killed in action - one week before the Armistice). Discovering that photo was an incredible gift.

I'll take your advice regarding Findmypast and the National Archives in July. I'll also research the battles that my uncles fought in before my trip to France. I've done some reading on the Christmas Truce, and it's fascinating to think that Robert could have been one of the men who participated in that memorable day with the enemy. All the information you've provided will make my trip that much richer.

With gratitude,
Marion
Posted by: Howard Barkell {Email left}
Location: Lydford Devon
Date: Saturday 14th December 2013 at 9:19 AM
Dear Alan,
I am researching Henry Wyndham Bernard Wood. From his medal card he was a gunner in 330 Siege Battery, RGA, number 75543. His Silver War Badge entry does not specify reason for early discharge. Could it have been wounds, sickness or just age? I can't find any reference to a 330 Battery to pin down his overseas service. I am sure that your expert eye will come up with far more than I can.
Regards,
Howard
Reply from: Alan Greveson
Date: Saturday 14th December 2013 at 4:52 PM

Dear Howard,
No individual service record has survived for Henry Wyndham Bernard Wood so it is not possible to state his war service. In the 1911 census he appeared to go by the name of Wyndham Wood. A medal card stated he enlisted on 16th November 1915 and was discharged on 15th November 1917. The cause of discharge was not stated other than "being no longer physically fit for war service" as described in King's Regulations paragraph 392 xvi. A silver War Badge was granted under Army Order 265 of 1917 2A (i). The order stated: "having served his country and still of military age, and served overseas on active service, is now discharged through disablement or ill health" Paragraph 2A (i) stated: "After service overseas in the armed Forces of the crown, on account of disablement or ill-health caused otherwise than by misconduct."
His stated age on discharge was 42 years, which was not too old to serve as a soldier. The maximum age for initial enlistment under conscription was set for a man who, on 15 August 1915, had attained the age of 19 but was not yet 41. So, the maximum age for enlistment was during the man's 40th year. Obviously, he would continue to serve after that. In 1918 the maximum age was raised to the man's 50th year, so it is improbable Wyndham Wood was discharged because of age at 42.
He was discharged from 330 Siege Battery RGA two years after enlisting. The Battery had served at the Third Battle of Ypres (31st July 10th November 1917). The Battery had been formed and was equipped with four six-inch guns in late 1916 at Prees Heath training camp, Shropshire. Its strength was six officers and 154 other ranks. It is possible he had enlisted in another Artillery unit and had been posted to 330 Siege Battery when it was raised late in 1916. On 24 May 1917, the Battery embarked for France and Flanders aboard SS "Viper" at Southampton, and was destined, via Heavy Artillery Garrison HQ near La Clytte, Dunkirk, for the Ypres salient to operate with the Fifth Army. The Battery's war diary dated May 1917 to June 1918 is held at The National Archives in Catalogue reference WO 95/545. The Battery was mentioned in the works of (Percy) Wyndham Lewis who served with 330 Siege Battery at Ypres. A biography of Lewis by Paul O'Keefe has a couple of pages mentioning 330 Siege Battery at Ypres. See:
http://books.google.co.uk/books?id=-LNw6Q6DcHMC&pg=PT162&lpg=PT162&dq=330+siege+battery&source=bl&ots=s2BP9NSdvr&sig=SC8wMpk5Y4HhqeQMS5cefrcrUDE&hl=en&sa=X&ei=NDWsUumdCM2ThQfF2YDIDg&ved=0CEMQ6AEwAw#v=onepage&q=330%20siege%20battery&f=false
Lewis afterwards became a "war artist" and in 1919 he painted a picture of 'A Battery Shelled' which is said to represent some members of 330 Siege Battery while at Wytschaete (known as White-sheet to the gunners). See:
http://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/16688
Given the short length of time he was abroad, from May 1917, it is plausible Wyndham Wood had been wounded or suffered sickness before or during the Third Battle of Ypres. Artillery units were subjected to longer-range counter-battery fire (trying to knock-out each others' guns) which involved mixed artillery barrages that included phosgene or chlorine gas.
With kind regards,
Alan
Reply from: Howard Barkell
Date: Saturday 14th December 2013 at 6:31 PM

Dear Alan,
Thank you once again for such a comprehensive reply with so little to go on! Even without any substantial documentary evidence you have given a fascinating insight into Wyndham Wood's possible military journey which I would otherwise not have known. I will try to follow up your suggested references.
He lived in Lydford for the rest of his life, a bachelor, described as Gentleman, but died at a comparatively early age, possibly as a result of his war service.
With many thanks,
Howard
Posted by: Eric Darley {Email left}
Location: Leeds
Date: Friday 13th December 2013 at 8:09 PM
Hello Alan,
RE: My grandfather pte10378 William Wilson of the East Yorks Regiiment.

I wonder if you could help me with some research of my grandfather's time in the East Yorkshire Regiment and his service at Gallipoli. His medal index card shows that he served in 2B the Balkans and was wounded and evacuated, eventually arriving at Beckett's Park Military Hospital sometime in 1915.
Any information you could provide would be most appreciated.

Thank you and regards.

Eric Darley
Reply from: Alan Greveson
Date: Saturday 14th December 2013 at 10:27 AM

Dear Eric,
No individual service record appears to have survived for William Wilson so it is not possible to state his war service. The Army medal rolls index card for Private William Wilson stated that he entered the Balkans theatre of war (2B, which indicated Gallipoli (Dardanelles)) on 14th July 1915 with the East Yorkshire Regiment. He qualified for the 1914-15 Star, British War Medal and the Victory Medal. "SWB List" indicated he received a silver War Badge for being discharged through wounds or sickness as "no longer physically fit for war service" under Paragraph 392 xvi of King's Regulations. The 6th Battalion East Yorkshire Regiment sailed from Avonmouth on 1st July 1915 and arrived at Mudros on 16th July 1915. The Battalion landed at Suvla Bay on 7th August 1915. The 6th Battalion was a pioneer (works) battalion which served as the labour force for 11th Division.
The War Badge roll recorded William Wilson enlisted on 14th August 1914 and was discharged on 27th July 1918. He received a badge in accordance with Army Order 265 of September 1917 Paragraph 2 B(1) which referred to those "who, having served as soldiers and being still of military age have been discharged after service overseas in the armed forces of the Crown, on account of disablement or ill-health caused otherwise than by misconduct."
With kind regards,
Alan
Reply from: Eric Darley
Date: Saturday 14th December 2013 at 4:30 PM

Hello Alan,

Thanks very much for that.

Please could you advise how I can make a payment to the British Legion for the information you have provided ?

Thank you and regards.

Eric Darley
Reply from: Alan Greveson
Date: Saturday 14th December 2013 at 4:45 PM

Dear Eric,
There are various ways to pay a single payment from £3 listed on the Legion's website at
http://www.britishlegion.org.uk/get-involved/how-to-give/?gclid=CLzP1biUsLsCFWzHtAodXncAfA
Thank you for donating.
With kind regards,
Alan
Reply from: Eric Darley
Date: Wednesday 18th December 2013 at 7:35 PM

Hello Alan,
Thanks for that.
I have just made a donation.

If you come across any information re the 6th Service Battalion Pioneers of The East Yorkshire Regiment,
particularly there time at Gallipoli I would much appreciate it if you could let me know.

Best Regards

Eric Darley
Posted by: Kev {Email left}
Location: Mansfield
Date: Thursday 12th December 2013 at 8:54 AM
Hi Alan,

Would it be possible for you to look through and de-cypher the service records of Private Charles Tarrant, West Yorkshire Regiment No 7142, Died 22/08/1920. I have recently found his war grave in my local cemetery and as his service records have survived I will be making a memorial page for him, there is also a memorial on his grave to his wife Annie who died in 1951 and to their son, also named Charles who died on active service in 1945 in Italy.

Best Regards,

Kev.
Reply from: Alan Greveson
Date: Thursday 12th December 2013 at 8:31 PM

Dear Kev,
Charles Tarrant enlisted in the Sherwood Foresters (Nottinghamshire and Derbyshire Regiment) on 15th November 1892 and served in India, taking part in the North West Frontier Operations 1897-98 with the 2nd Battalion during the Tirah Campaign for which he earned the India General Service Medal. He returned to the UK on 4th April 1899 and was posted to the 1st Battalion to serve in South Africa during the Second Anglo-Boer War from December 1899 to the end of the war. He qualified for the Queen's South Africa Medal and the King's South Africa Medal. He returned to the UK on 3rd September 1902 and was transferred to the Reserve on 3rd September 1903. He was discharged on 14th November 1904 after 12 years' service. He then elected to spend four years on the D Reserve meaning he could be called-up in the event of mobilization. He was finally discharged in 1908 and he became a silk tie trimmer, setting-up home at Bleak Hill in Mansfield.
During the First World War he re-enlisted in the Sherwood Foresters on September 9th 1914 and remained with them in the UK until 26th May 1916 when he was transferred to the 1st Garrison Battalion of the King's Own Yorkshire Light Infantry. Garrison battalions were raised from men too old or unfit for full military service. On 3rd November 1916 Charles was transferred to the 1st Garrison Battalion of the Prince of Wales's Own West Yorkshire Regiment. The Battalion was sent to the island of Malta for garrison duties on 5th November 1916 and returned to the UK on 13th January 1919. Malta was not a theatre of war and was used as a hospital base for the Mediterranean and as a coaling station for ships. For service in Malta he qualified for the British War Medal.
He was discharged to the reserve on 25th February 1919 and received a pension. He died of myelitis and pneumonia aged 48 on 22nd August 1920.
He had married Annie Spray on 25th October 1902. They had six children, the oldest of whom was Charles born 14th July 1903. He became a craftsman in the Royal Electrical and Mechanical Engineers and died in Italy on 29th May 1945. He was buried at Bari. The CWGC says: "There was no serious fighting in the vicinity of the town, which was the Army Group headquarters during the early stages of the Italian campaign, but it continued to be an important supply base and hospital centre, with the 98th General Hospital stationed there from October 1943 until the end of the war."
With kind regards,
Alan
Reply from: Kev
Date: Friday 13th December 2013 at 3:34 PM

Dear Alan

Thank you very much for all that information.

I was wondering, if he died of illness in 1920, over a year after he was discharged from the army, why does he have a war grave?

Best Regards,

Kev.
Reply from: Alan Greveson
Date: Friday 13th December 2013 at 3:51 PM

Dear Kev,
When the then Imperial War Graves Commission was established in 1917 its role was to care for the graves and memorials of those who had died as a result of 'wounds inflicted, accident occurring or disease contracted, while on service whether on sea or land'. Charles's service record showed he had received a pension for sickness attributable to the war, so when he died in 1920 the criteria for being given a war grave would have been met.
With kind regards,
Alan
Posted by: Gillyisme {Email left}
Location: Australia
Date: Thursday 12th December 2013 at 6:00 AM
Hi was hoping someone could help me find out information of my grand uncle William Dufton Rhoades he served in world war 1 and was a sargeant major in 2nd battalion Leinster ret in france
Reply from: Alan Greveson
Date: Thursday 12th December 2013 at 8:32 PM

No individual service record has survived for William Rhoades so it is not possible to state his military record in detail. He served with the 2nd Battalion The Prince of Wales's Leinster Regiment (Royal Canadians) which was a regular army battalion that was stationed at Cork, Ireland, in August 1914. William D. Rhoades was a corporal with the Battalion when it went abroad on September 9th 1914 and landed at St Nazire, France. The Battalion served with the 6th Division until October 1915. For the 6th Division's history see:
http://www.1914-1918.net/6div.htm
It fought with the 24th Division from October 1915. For the Division's history see:
http://www.1914-1918.net/24div.htm
The London County Council Record of War Service stated he served 2 years and three months in France, suggesting he returned to the UK, possibly wounded, about December 1916. William rose to the rank of Company Sergeant Major. He qualified for the 1914 Star with Mons Clasp; the British War Medal and the Victory Medal.
With kind regards,
Alan
Posted by: Charliegw {Email left}
Location: St Thomas On Canada
Date: Wednesday 11th December 2013 at 6:41 PM
Hi Alan:
Still having much difficulty finding appropriate ww1 battlefield maps to try to locate where my soldier fell in battle. For example, according to the battalion diarist, on the "Albert Map" the front for 10Bn E. Yorks. Regt on the Tambour salient in France, May 1, 1917 extended from F.3.a.10.7 (North) to F.3.c.2.2 (South) from Contour 105 to Contour 70 with frontage of 900 yards. Will you help a neophyte who did not pass his Boy Scout map reading badge with any of this? Many thanks indeed.
Charlie
Reply from: Alan Greveson
Date: Wednesday 11th December 2013 at 10:45 PM

Dear Charlie,
To interpret a map reference it is necessary to possess the particular map from which it was taken. Some trench maps have been reproduced online, but, in general, complete maps of the specific date are hard to find. Original maps that have survived are held at the UK National Archives or in museums and private hands. Commercial CD ROMs of selections of trench maps are available for about 250 Canadian dollars but may not contain a specific map. See:
http://www.naval-military-press.com/national-archives-british-trench-map-atlas-the-western-front-1914-18-1-10-000-regular-series-with-an-index-of-over-20-000-trench-and-topographical-names-and-a-commentary-for-each-map.html
To read a grid reference, see:
http://www.westernfrontassociation.com/attachments/590_How%20to%20read%20read%20a%20Trenchmap-rev5.pdf
The Tambour Salient was to the West of the village of Fricourt. See:
http://www.scienceandsociety.co.uk/results.asp?image=10432090
With kind regards,
Alan
Posted by: Charliegw {Email left}
Location: St Thomas On Canada
Date: Wednesday 11th December 2013 at 6:24 PM
Hi Alan:
Last year you helped with Cockerline soldiers in ww1. I recently found another: Pte. Joseph Richard Cockerline of Sculcoates/Hull, Yorks. Service # 13889 in the Royal Field Artillery and 447275 in Army Service Corps. I am wondering why he was discharged as no longer fit to serve. Any info. you can locate to help to fill in my many blanks would be greatly appreciated.
Charlie
Reply from: Alan Greveson
Date: Wednesday 11th December 2013 at 10:44 PM

Dear Charlie,
Joseph Richard Cockerline enlisted on 22 March 1915 at the age of 42 and served overseas with 32nd Divisional Ammunition Column RFA between 30th December 1915 and 1st July 1917. On that date he returned to England, probably unfit, and did not serve overseas again before he was discharged, at the age of 46, on 16th May 1919. He suffered from myalgia (muscle pain) which was attributed to war service and which caused a 40 per cent disability. On discharge from war service, those men who were fit were placed on the Z Reserve, which meant they would be called up again if the Armistice with Germany did not hold. The Z Reserve was in effect until March 31st 1920. When Joseph was discharged six months after the Armistice, he was discharged under Paragraph 392 (sub para xvi) of King's Regulations which referred to men who were then "medically unfit to re-engage for war service". His discharge was, therefore, in order to excuse him from being placed on the Z Reserve for possible future service. His discharge was through sickness and age. By 1918, young men who had reached the age of 18 and therefore qualified for compulsory conscription were called-up and were able to serve overseas to relieve the older and more long-serving men. It is no discredit that Joseph was "no longer fit" he was being excused further service. A silver War Badge record showed he was discharged through "sickness" as opposed to wounds. (In pre-war days a regular soldier having served 21 years would have been described as "worn out" by the age of 40.)
Having arrived in France on December 30th 1915, Joseph qualified for the 1914-15 Star - by just 24 hours. The medal was awarded for service overseas before midnight on December 31st 1915. The 32nd Division's history can be seen at:
http://www.1914-1918.net/32div.htm
With kind regards,
Alan
Posted by: Terry {Email left}
Location: Embleton
Date: Wednesday 11th December 2013 at 2:38 PM
Hello Alan
I don't know if you remember me as part of the small team preparing a book on men from Embleton village who died in the 'Great War'. We are almost finished but at the last moment have discovered another man about whom we need to know his military record. His name is Thomas Appleby who was killed on April 22nd 1918 in Egypt. He is buried in Alexandria (Hadra) War Memorial Cemetery. He was a member of the Royal Field Artillery (number 147898) and was 37 when he died. We know his father was Thomas (b Embleton 1847) and his mother Margaret (b Falkirk 1847) and that his father ran the local hotel. He had a brother and a sister. He lived in Wolverhampton and was married with three children when he was called up. Ay help you can give us would be gratefully received and followed by a donation to the British Legion. Thanks for all your help.
Terry
Reply from: Alan Greveson
Date: Wednesday 11th December 2013 at 9:23 PM

Dear Terry,
No individual service record has survived for Thomas Appleby so it is not possible to state his military service. He appears to have been born in 1879 at Embleton, although the CWGC recorded he was a native of Edinburgh. As a child in the 1881 census he lived with his parents and brother, Alexander, at the Hare and Hounds Inn, Embleton, where his father was a stone merchant and innkeeper. In 1891 he was shown at the same address with two sisters, Margaret and Frances. In 1901 he was recorded as a blacksmith boarding at Alnwick and by 1911 he had moved to Wolverhampton where what appears to be his sister, Frances, was married to James Quigley. James and Frances were proprietors of a kinematograph and Thomas was described as a kinematograph bill inspector. The kinematograph was a film camera and projector which showed silent films which were often accompanied by a speaker or lecturer. See:
http://www.cineressources.net/images/ouv_num/259.pdf
In the first three months of 1914, Thomas Appleby married Sophia A. Taylor at Wolverhampton. There were three children named Appleby born at Wolverhampton with a mother's maiden name of Taylor. They were Iris (Oct-Dec 1914); Thomas (Oct-Dec 1916) and Vera (Jan - Mar 1918).
An Army medal rolls index card recorded Gunner Appleby qualified for the British War Medal and the Victory Medal. As he did not qualify for the 1914-15 Star for service overseas before December 31st 1915, he did not go overseas until some date after January 1st 1916. "Soldiers Died in the Great War" (HMSO 1921) recorded Thomas Appleby died of sickness on 22nd April 1918 and was buried at Alexandria. The CWGC states: "Alexandria remained an important hospital centre during later operations in Egypt and Palestine and the port was much used by hospital ships and troop transports bringing reinforcements and carrying the sick and wounded out of the theatres of war." On the date of his death he was on the strength of the 60th Divisional Ammunition Column, although that may have been an administrative description as he may have been struck-off the strength of an RFA Battery and administered by the Ammunition Column whilst he was in hospital. His widow later married Walter Lampitt at Newport, Mon., early in 1920. The history of the 60th Division is shown at:
http://www.1914-1918.net/60div.htm
With kind regards,
Alan
Reply from: Ann Appleby
Date: Monday 3rd November 2014 at 9:20 PM

Hi i have just read your letter regarding my grandfather thomas appleby i would be grateful if you could contact me as aim doing my family history and would be grateful for any information that you have.

many thanks
barrbara ann appleby.
Reply from: Terry
Date: Monday 3rd November 2014 at 11:06 PM

Hello Barbara

During our research for the book we were writing on the men from Embleton who were killed in WW1 we did discover some information relating to Thomas. If you would like to contact me on 01665 576618 I would be happy to pass these on to you.

Kind regards

Terry
Reply from: Alan Greveson
Date: Monday 3rd November 2014 at 11:18 PM

Dear Barbara,
I am afraid I have no further information about Thomas Appleby, other than the above.
With kind regards,
Alan
Posted by: David Cordell {Email left}
Location: Washington Dc
Date: Thursday 5th December 2013 at 10:42 PM
Looking to fill in the details of my great great uncle Joseph Bernard Harris who died September 11 1916. I know when he joined the London Scottish and where he died and is buried at La Neuville cemetery I think, based on my limited research, that he may have been injured on September 9 at Ginchy and transferred to a medical unit where he died.

His regimental number was 6936

Any help in finding out any more info would be greatly appreciated.
Reply from: Alan Greveson
Date: Friday 6th December 2013 at 2:21 PM

Dear David,
There is not much to add to what you already know. Joseph Harris enlisted under The Derby Scheme on 9th December 1915 at Wembley. The scheme was a last minute call for volunteers before compulsory conscription was introduced in 1916. It encouraged men to "enlist now be called up later". Joseph was called up on 28th February 1916 and trained with the 3rd/14th Battalion The London Regiment, a training battalion, at Winchester, before being posted on 10th July 1916 as part of a draft of reinforcements to the 1st/14th Battalion serving in France and Flanders. He joined the battalion in the field on about 24th July 1916. He was wounded in the abdomen by a piercing wound (G.S.W. gun-shot wound) on 9th September 1916, which was probably during the Battle of Ginchy. He was admitted to a main dressing station of XIV Corps on the 10th and he died at No 21 Casualty Clearing Station at Le Neuville near Corbie in the Somme department of France on 11th September 1916. He was buried at Le Neuville British Cemetery. He qualified for the British War Medal and the Victory Medal.
With kind regards,
Alan

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