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Posted by: Martin {Email left}
Location: Australia
Date: Sunday 14th April 2013 at 3:14 PM
Hi, I'm trying to trace details of my grandfather. His name is Joseph Campbell and was with the Royal Inniskilling Fusiliers 4691 and was discharged 4th January 1917
Reply from: Alan Greveson
Date: Sunday 14th April 2013 at 6:51 PM

Dear Martin,
There is no obvious surviving individual service record for Joseph Campbell 4691 Royal Inniskilling Fusiliers. Without knowing in which battalion he served it is not possible to state his wartime service. An Army medal rolls index card showed he qualified for the British War Medal and The Victory Medal. As he did not qualify for the 1914-15 Star for service overseas before December 31st 1915, he would not have served abroad until some date after January 1st 1916. He enlisted on 29th October 1914 and was discharged because of wounds on 4th January 1917. He qualified for a silver War Badge for being wounded.
You may wish to consider spending GBP 25 (AUD 37) to ask the Western Front Association to manually search their archive of 6.5 million pension record cards (PRCs) which are not available elsewhere. This is a new service launched this month and may provide some additional detail for Joseph. See:
http://www.westernfrontassociation.com/about-the-wfa/175-pension-records/2961-pension-record-cards-manual-lookup-request.html

Kind regards,
Alan
Reply from: Martin
Date: Monday 15th April 2013 at 10:12 AM

Thanks Alan, I'll follow up on that lead.

The only other detail I have is a stamp "EXPDY FORCE FRANCE" and a serial number 27/607 on Form D/2007.

Regards, Martin
Posted by: Rosemary Bishop {Email left}
Location: Taunton
Date: Saturday 13th April 2013 at 5:34 PM
Hi there

I am trying to find out more information about my grandfather Lawrence Styles of Middleton, Lancashire. He was born in 1894 and worked in a cotton mill. I have a photo of him in the uniform of the Seaforth Highlanders with his fiancee, my grandmother. I am intrigued to know why a Lancashire lad, who I dont think had ever left his home town, ended up in the Seaforth Highlanders? I have seen his medal card, which says he was a private and his number was S/11623 but cant find any more records. I beleive he was a prisoner of war in Dalmen Wesft, Germany (taken on 1st July 1916) and my uncle remembers him talking about working in mines in the freezing cold?. A report in a local newspaper describes him as a 'bomber', whatever that was. He survived the war.

Can anyone help me with any more information as to why he may have joined the Seaforth Highlanders and what may have happened to him in the war?

Many thanks
Rosemary Bishop
Reply from: Alan Greveson
Date: Saturday 13th April 2013 at 9:55 PM

Dear Rosemary,
Without having an individual service record for Lawrence Styles it will not be possible to immediately identify his wartime service in detail. He qualified for the British War Medal and the Victory Medal. As he did not qualify for the 1914-15 Star for service overseas before December 31st 1915, he did not serve overseas until some date after January 1st 1916. As all the battalions of the Seaforth Highlanders that served abroad were already overseas in 1915, Lawrence Styles would have been part of a draft of reinforcements that went abroad after January 1st 1916.
Had he been called-up and conscripted in 1916, he would have had no say in which regiment he served because the Military Service Acts of 1916 removed the element of choice. Had he enlisted in the first fourteen months of the war he would have been able to state a preference for a regiment; he might have been influenced by a recruiting officer wearing Highland uniform; or by joining-up alongside his friends. It would be unwise to believe a soldier would have automatically served in a local regiment; many did at the outset of war, but, after that, they were deployed "in the interests of the Service". If they hadn't been, there might have been few recruits for essential services such as the Royal Engineers, Royal Artillery or the Army Service Corps. There is no immediate record of which battalion of the Seaforth Highlanders Lawrence served in, or where. It appears he did not serve abroad for long before he was taken prisoner.
His five-digit regimental number was typical of those allotted for wartime service only. The 'S' prefix was used by Highland regiments to denote wartime enlistment.
The Prisoner of War Camp would have been at Dulmen, in Westphalia, Germany. The satellite camps were called "working commandos", in English, and the main assembly camp was five miles from the town on a high heathland, where the main barracks were described by the Red Cross as "good". This would have been his administrative camp, known as a Kriegsgefangenenlager (war (krieg) captured persons (gefangenen) camp (lager)). Most prisoners spent much of their time at any of a number of satellite camps, often some distance from the administrative camp. All Prisoner of War records are held by the Archives of the International Committee of the Red Cross in Geneva, Switzerland (ICRC Archives). The records are expected to go online in the next year or so. See:
http://www.icrc.org/eng/resources/documents/article/other/archives-first-world-war-2011-07-27.htm

Prisoners would have been repatriated, under normal circumstances, in November or December 1918. There is much about Dulmen on the internet. Search using "Dulmen PoW". Also enter (within quotation marks) "kriegsgefangenenlager Dulmen" in Google images.
What we now think of as "bombs" were referred to as artillery shells during the First World War or, as aviation bombing was in its infancy, aerial bombs. A "bomber", as opposed to a Grenadier, was an infantry soldier who was, in addition to his other skills, trained to throw a bomb, which was the contemporary word for what would, today, be called a hand-grenade. The "Mills Patent Grenade, Hand, No.5" had been introduced in 1915. On trench raids, or in the attack, the "bomber's" job was to carry a satchel of grenades and lob them with the necessary accuracy to clear enemy trenches and dug-outs, neutralising the enemy's position. An advantage was that, whilst rifle fire, or the bayonet, required line-of-sight, a bomb could be lobbed into a strong-point or over an obstruction that obscured sight of the enemy. See:
http://www.firstworldwar.com/weaponry/grenades.htm

If Lawrence continued to serve after 1920, when he appears to have married, his service record might be held by the Ministry of Defence who will conduct searches for a fee of £30. See
http://www.veterans-uk.info/service_records/service_records.html

Click on the link and then look for "Service records - requests for service records of deceased service personnel" in the left-hand column.
Kind regards,
Alan
Reply from: Rosemary Bishop
Date: Sunday 14th April 2013 at 6:44 PM

Dear Alan

I cannot thank you enough for taking the time to give me such very valuable information about my grandfather. I lost my parents many years ago and so have not been able to ask them for their memories.

You have completely made my day - thank you so very much.

Rosemary
Posted by: Jonboy {Email left}
Location: Harlow Essex England
Date: Thursday 11th April 2013 at 11:41 AM
Hi Alan
Can you find out for me on my Gt Uncle Frederick W Jordan B 20 June 1897,on his card it reads as follows :
Corps R E 505836 E Kent R1359 R E WR 309224.
Regards
Jonboy
Reply from: Alan Greveson
Date: Thursday 11th April 2013 at 1:40 PM

Dear Jonboy,
Frederick Walter Jordan whose medal card you have identified was born at Faversham on August 27th 1892 and baptised at Boughton under Blean, Kent, on October 9th 1892, the son of Frank and Eliza of Faversham.
Do you believe this man to be your ancestor or was your ancestor definitely born 20 June 1897?
Kind regards,
Alan
Reply from: Jonboy
Date: Thursday 11th April 2013 at 2:22 PM

Hi Alan
According to records Frederick Walter Jordan Born June 1897 Baptised 01 Sep 1897 at Harrow St Mary.
Parents were :Albert E Jordan and Fanny Chimes.Frederick was married to Daisy Edith May on 07 June
1919 in Middx.In 1911 he was living at 7 Prospect Place Mortlake with Family.Hope this helps.
Regards
Jonboy
Reply from: Alan Greveson
Date: Thursday 11th April 2013 at 2:53 PM

Dear Jonboy,
Then he is not the man on the medal card. That was Frederick Walter Jordan No. 1359 The Buffs (East Kent Regiment) who enlisted in the part-time Territorial Army of the 4th Battalion The Buffs (East Kent Regiment) on 16th January 1912 aged 19 years and 5 months. He was a carpenter with Jordan Brothers at Herne Bay. He was the son of Frank and Eliza Jordan, 2 Carlton Villas, Herne Bay. He was born August 27th 1892 and baptised at Boughton under Blean, Kent, on October 9th 1892.
It has not been possible to find a military record for Frederick Jordan born 1897.
Kind regards,
Alan
Reply from: Jonboy
Date: Thursday 11th April 2013 at 3:11 PM

Hi Alan
Thanks for trying possible he didnt join up maybe Ancestry sent me through that Medal Card but it only had
Frederick W Jordan so i gambled it was him as ive looked over 5000 records on Ancestry to no avail.Still,i.
will keep looking on other sites.
Kind Regards
Jonboy
Posted by: Gill Railton {Email left}
Location: Hull East Yorkshire
Date: Wednesday 10th April 2013 at 9:10 PM
Hello Alan
I am just hoping you can help with another query
I am researching my great aunts husband Walter Albert Gardham Born 1900 in Hull .
I have found a little information from his army record but am finding it confusing as it states he was transfared to the Machine Gun Corps 18th November 1918 ( after the end of War ?) and then to Russian Relief Force in 1919.
just wondering why he would have been sent to Russia after the end of the war and what exactly he would have been doing there?
Hoping you can help
Best wishes Gill Railton
Reply from: Alan Greveson
Date: Thursday 11th April 2013 at 1:13 PM

Dear Gill,
It is a common miss-conception that the First World War ended on November 11th 1918.
That was the date of the Armistice between the Allied and the German armies in France and Belgium. An armistice is a truce between military opponents, so the Germans were allowed to return to their homeland with their weapons, after November 11th 1918. To ensure the peace held, an allied Army of Occupation entered the Rhineland, Germany, in December 1918.
Prior to the Russian Revolution in 1917 and the subsequent civil war in Russia, Britain had supported the Tsar of Russia and the Russian Army. The mother of Tsar Nicholas II was the sister of the British Queen Alexandra, the mother of King George V who reigned during the war. The Cossack army fought alongside the British in such places at Mesopotamia (Iraq). Britain helped Russia defend Murmansk from German advances. However, Britain did not support the Communist Russians who raised the Red (Communist) Army which fought against the White (Non-Communist) Russians. The Allies sent troops to help the White Russians defeat communism in the fighting that occurred in the North of Russia (via Archangel and Murmansk) and on the Black Sea coast (via Odessa) in the South.

In North Russia, the Allies had a military presence to prevent Germany from gaining the large stock-piles of military material that had been despatched to Murmansk during the war. After the Russian revolution, the White Russians, under Admiral Kolchak, were fighting against the Bolshevik Army along the Dvina River. The Allies intervened from the autumn of 1918, but the political motivation to fight declined, and by early 1919 the British Press was calling for a withdrawal. In the meantime, the sea had frozen for the winter and the withdrawal of the British and allied troops via the Northern sea route became impossible until the ice thawed.
A North Russian Relief Force was mustered in Britain which set sail in Spring 1919 to assist the safe withdrawal from North Russia once the sea routes were open. Forty-five vessels helped with the evacuation from Archangel and Murmansk.

In January 1918, Walter Gardham had been compulsorily conscripted at the age of 18 (born January 16th 1900) and joined the Royal Flying Corps through its recruit depot at Farnborough on 21 January 1918. Two days later on 23 January 1918 he arrived at St Leonard's on Sea which was home to the RFC Cadet School. His attestation paper was marked "aviator", so he appears to have been a trainee pilot. On April 1st 1918, the RFC became the RAF and Walter had been re-numbered as 117502 Learner Pilot (Air Mechanic Class 3; pay 1s 6d a day).
He was compulsorily transferred to the Infantry on 8th March 1918. His record showed him in the rank of AM3 "Compulsorily transferred to the Middlesex Rgt at infantry rates of pay" (one shilling a day). Such transfers were common under the Military Service Acts "in the interests of the Service". He actually served in the 3rd/7th Battalion London Regiment for a short time, as, on 18th April 1918, he was transferred to the Machine Gun Battalion. This was a unit named the 4th Battalion Machine Gun Guards, on 1 March 1918, but which was re-named the Guards Machine Gun Regiment, by a Royal Warrant of 10 May 1918. He trained with the 5th (Reserve) Battalion Guards Machine Gun Regiment at Purbright, Surrey, in the rank of private (guardsman).
On 25 May 1919, Walter was attached to the 201st Battalion Machine Gun Corps (201 MGC) which had what appears to be the suffix AA (Anti-aircraft). This was for service with the unit that went to North Russia.
Walter sailed, with a thousand other troops from the Royal Fusiliers, on the Steam Ship "Steigerwald", a former German vessel, from Leith on June 10th 1919 and disembarked at Archangel on June 16th 1919. This was part of the North Russian Relief Force. See:
http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:North_Russian_Blockhouse_%28AWM_A03725%29.jpg

On 14th September 1919, Walter was shown on the Nom[inal] Ret[urn] of 201 MGC when he embarked on the SS Ulva to return to the UK. On 13th October 1919 he re-joined the 4th Battalion Guards Machine Gun Regiment. On 25th November 1919 Guardsman Walter Gardham was transferred to the reserve from a dispersal camp at Ripon.
The reverse of an Allied Victory Medal, issued to soldiers of all Allied nations, reads: "The Great War for Civilisation 1914- 1919" which gives us the correct dates for the war and the name "The Great War" by which it was known before wars had to be numbered. The name is still valid, but the dates have been overlooked.
The peace treaties between belligerent nations of the First World War were signed on various dates, with the Germans being invited to sign at Versailles on 28th June 1919. The British Government passed "The Termination of The War Declaration Act" (12 Geo V, No 59) in 1921 which declared the war was deemed to have ended on 10th January 1920.
British soldiers who survived the war, and who were still fit to fight, were transferred to the Class Z Reserve in case the Armistice with Germany did not hold. Commitment to the Class Z Reserve was deemed to have ended on March 31st 1920.
There are two service files for Walter as an RAF officer (cadet) held at the National Archives at Kew. They can be downloaded online at a cost of £3.36 each. See:
http://discovery.nationalarchives.gov.uk/SearchUI/Details?uri=D8262559
and
http://discovery.nationalarchives.gov.uk/SearchUI/Details?uri=D8262560

He qualified for the British War Medal and the Victory Medal.
Kind regards,
Alan
Posted by: Jammin208
Location: Silsden
Date: Wednesday 10th April 2013 at 4:21 PM
Hi wondered if anyone can help me i have a picture in my family photos it is a photo of some war men in uniforms.im thinking world war1... there is a sign that reads "19batt middlesex reg" "transport on the rhine".
i persume this was my great grandad ALBERT EDWARD ENDERSBY... COULD BE WRONG could also post the picture.thanks in advance.x
Reply from: Jammin208
Date: Thursday 9th May 2013 at 11:02 PM

Keep checking back for reply Anyone help?
Posted by: Jeremy Thornton {Email left}
Location: France
Date: Wednesday 10th April 2013 at 9:30 AM
Alan,
A further snippet of information if possible. When my great uncle was detached to the 1st Army Musketry Camp at Matringham from 2 Feb 1918 until 17 May1918, would this have been for any specific purpose. Musketry implies rifles and shooting. Bearing in mind he had already been in the Army since July 1916 and in France since Feb 1917 presumably he was familiar with the standard service issue armaments at this time.

Also during this period he was allowed leave from 21 Feb to 7 March, extended to 17 March and again to 27 March. Would he have been able to travel home to Yorkshire during this period and if so how easy was this. If not where was this leave spent. He re-joined the Regiment on 17 May 1918.

More information please, I have just found out that he was in fact in the 2/10th Battalion up until the 30 April 1918 and not the 1/10 which means that the information I thought that I had found about the possible date and action for the award of his Military Medal in July/Aug 1917 is not valid as the diaries I was looking at were for the 1/10 Battalion.
However, the London Scottish Regiment museum believe that his award is more likely to have been for action with the 1/10 after the 2/10 were absorbed into the 1/10 at the end of April 1918. They sugest a period of Sept to Oct 1918, do you know just what actions the 1/10 Kings Liverpool Regiment, which by this time were part of the 172nd Brigade, 57th (2nd West Lancs) Division were involved with during this period.

Jeremy Thornton
Reply from: Alan Greveson
Date: Wednesday 10th April 2013 at 1:13 PM

Dear Jeremy,
An attachment to a musketry school may have been either as an instructor or a student. He could have been sent to help instruct; to administer a course; to learn something new or to learn how to teach musketry. It is not possible to say. He had been promoted and it is possible he had been sent to learn how to instruct and teach musketry within the Battalion.
It is not possible to say where a man spent his leave. Once a man had left the coast of France in the morning he could have been home in Yorkshire by train via London within a few hours.
In February of this year I explained that Julian Thornton served in the 2/10th Battalion and then served with the 1/10th Battalion when the two battalions merged in April 1918.
The merged battalion served in the 55th Division, not the 57th Division. ("British Regiments 1914-1918" Brigadier E A James, 1971).
In 1918 the 55th Division fought at The Battle of Estaires (9-11 April 1918) including the Defence of Givenchy (9-17 April 1918) and The Battle of Hazebrouck (12-15 April 1918) which were part of the Battle of the Lys (Fourth Ypres). The Division played a major part in the capture of the Givenchy craters (24 August) and the capture of Canteleux trench (17 September). They then took part in the The pursuit to Mons, a phase of the Final Advance in Artois (2 October - 11 November 1918) in which the Division advanced 50 miles in 80 days.
The war diary of the 1/10th Battalion King's Liverpool Regiment up to 30th September 1919 is at the National Archives at Kew in Catalogue reference WO 95/2929/3.
Kind regards,
Alan
Reply from: Jeremy Thornton
Date: Wednesday 10th April 2013 at 3:03 PM

Alan,

Firstly let me appologise for wasting your time by asking the same question twice. It must be old age, I am 70 next month. However, in defence I have to say that so much of the information is very confusing all the different regiments and battalions. In a way there is often too much information, although having said that there is not enough for me to find out just what I would like to know. Spring is here in France so I will leave this now until the dark days of winter.

Jeremy Thornton
Posted by: Paul Davies {Email left}
Location: Regina Sask
Date: Wednesday 10th April 2013 at 12:30 AM
Can anyone help me with a Silver Wound Badge - number B157142 - I am looking for information on the individual it was issued too - any help greatly appreciated
Reply from: Alan Greveson
Date: Wednesday 10th April 2013 at 1:10 PM

Dear Paul,
There is no such thing as a silver wound badge; it was a silver War Badge. The war badge numbered B157142 was issued in March 1919 to Sapper Henry Bradshaw who had served a short time in England with the Royal Engineers as a fitter's mate with the Inland Waterways and Docks section at Sudbury. He had been conscripted on 5th January 1918 at Bristol. In September 1918 he was diagnosed with a weak heart and was transferred to the reserve. He was discharged from the Army on 14th December 1918, aged 29 years.
Kind regards,
Alan
Posted by: Lizzie {Email left}
Location: Retford
Date: Tuesday 9th April 2013 at 6:06 PM
Hello Alan
I wonder if you can help at all with deciphering a medal card belonging to my husband's grandfather. The corps is R.E. (presumably Royal Engineers), Rank: Spr - not sure what that is. Regimental No: 471778 and (T) 2382. Not sure why there are 2 numbers. He got the usual 2 medals and there is no Theatre of War or Date of Entry He was a married man with children so would he have gone in 1916? and where did he go to since it doesn't say. The Medal Roll is R.E/101B176 Page 41953 but I don't suppose looking at the Roll would say any more than there is on the Index Card. We didn't know he was in the war so it is a bit of a mystery. Hope you can elucidate. Many thanks. Liz
Reply from: Alan Greveson
Date: Wednesday 10th April 2013 at 1:08 PM

Dear Lizzie,
The medal card would show that he was a Sapper (private soldier with a skilled trade) in the Royal Engineers who qualified for the British War Medal and the Victory Medal. As he did not qualify for the 1914-15 Star for service overseas before December 31st 1915, he did not serve overseas until some date after January 1st 1916. The fact he had two regimental numbers suggests he may have served with a Territorial Army unit of the Royal Engineers, as these men were re-numbered with six-digit numbers early in 1917.
You do not say what you ancestor's name was.
The medal card for 471778 RE was in the name of Cecil Ashforth. The British War Medal was supposed to be impressed with the number and details of the man as he first went abroad, which suggests that Cecil Ashworth first went abroad after the six-digit number had been issued in February/March 1917. His former number was a Territorial number, 2382. There was also a war badge list index card for a Cyril Ashforth with the same number 471778 in the Royal Engineers who enlisted on 23rd September 1916 (which date indicated he was a conscripted soldier) and was discharged on 5th June 1919 through sickness, qualifying for a silver War Badge for being discharged through sickness. He was discharged from the 20th Territorial Force depot. This was an administrative centre based at Gillingham in Kent and might have administered men in hospital in Kent. The 20th TF Depot administered, among other TF units, the Kent Fortress Royal Engineers, whose HQ was at Chatham. They had about seven companies throughout Kent.
However, the regimental number 471778 fell within the range 470001 to 472000 which was allotted to the three Durham Fortress Companies of the Royal Engineers when the old four-digit numbers were replaced early in 1917. Fortress Companies were formed for home defence duties and were converted to Field Companies for overseas service.
There appears to be no surviving individual service record so it is not possible to suggest his wartime service and it would be unsound to assume he remained with the same Royal Engineers unit throughout the war. The numbering suggests he initially went overseas having enlisted in a former Durham Fortress Company and was discharged through sickness while administered by a RE depot in Kent.
Kind regards,
Alan
Reply from: Lizzie
Date: Wednesday 10th April 2013 at 6:44 PM

Hi Alan
Many many thanks as ever for the information on my husband's grandfather, Cecil Ashforth, sorry for not supplying the name in the first instance. I will now have to do some more digging around in the local library to see if anything was said about him in the local newspapers.

Thank you so much.

Kind regards
Lizzie
Posted by: Jeremy Thornton {Email left}
Location: France
Date: Tuesday 9th April 2013 at 8:44 AM
Alan,

I have followed your advice and downloaded the only War Diary available to me which is for the Kings Liverpool Regiment where my Great Uncle Julian Thornton served. Whilst some of the handwritten text is difficult to read, I think that I have found the months when Military Medals were awarded. As Julian did not embarke to France until 10th Feb 1917 then it would appear that he could only have been one of the 17 awarded on the 1st August 1917. I need to re-visit the diary now to see which battle it was.
My question is, when would this award likely to have been printed in the local press? Could it have been within days or weeks of the diaries being submited where the award was noted, or is it more likely not to have been done until it was Gazetted? The library in Dewsbury are looking through the local press archives around the Gazetting date in July 1919 but so far has found nothing. This is surprising as Julian was the son of a prominent member of the local buisiness comunity and a local councellor.

Whilst looking through the diaries I have come across a couple of terms which I do not understand. 'Bustle positions' and also 'O.B.L' Any ideas?

Jeremy Thornton
Reply from: Alan Greveson
Date: Tuesday 9th April 2013 at 12:50 PM

Dear Jeremy,
The battle may have been The Battle of Pilkem Ridge (31 July - 2 August 1917) when the 55th Division attacked in the area of Spree, Pond and Schuler Farms, up to August 4th. The rest of the month was spent refitting. "Bustle Positions" would have been a place. All positions were given English names, the origins of which are now sometimes obscure, but sometimes obvious, such as those named after brands of cigarettes or London streets. I haven't seen the diary, but "Bustle Positions" appears to have been some trench positions near the canal in the Givenchy Cuinchy Le Preol area. OBL was the "Old British Line": a former trench line that would have been known to all.
Local newspapers would have taken their information from the London Gazette so the newspaper publication dates would be in the week or so following publication in the Gazette.
Kind regards,
Alan
Reply from: Jeremy Thornton
Date: Tuesday 9th April 2013 at 7:55 PM

Thanks again Alan. Not sure how much further I will get into nailing down just where and what action my great uncle got his Military medal for, but I certainly have a lot more information now than a few months ago, mainly thanks to you.
Posted by: Julie {Email left}
Location: Brighton
Date: Monday 8th April 2013 at 4:43 PM
Hi Alan
I have stumbled across this site today whilst trying to find more information on my Great Grandfather. I have read the stories here with great interest and wonder if you can help me at all. My Great Grandfather was Frederick Walter Timbs, born Holloway September 1891, he died in Brighton in 1969. He was, I think, in the ASC Reg No 048516. If there is anything you could add I would be most grateful, he died before I was born and I am very interested in finding out about his life.
Many thanks in anticipation.
Julie
Reply from: Alan Greveson
Date: Monday 8th April 2013 at 8:57 PM

Dear Julie,
It is only possible to give a generalised record of Frederick's service because it is not always immediately clear where a particular ASC company was based at various stages of the war. That would require further research for each unit.
Frederick Walter Timbs enlisted as a volunteer at Whitehall on 2nd February 1915 and joined the mechanical transport (MT) section of the Army Service Corps (ASC) at Grove Park, Greenwich on February 8th 1915. He was 23, 5ft 6ins, married and a motor driver by occupation. In the ASC, the MT depot was based in the old workshose at Greenwich. See:
http://www.workhouses.org.uk/Greenwich/
Frederick also did basic training at Crystal Palace and at Salisbury Plain, Wiltshire, and was posted to 178th Company ASC which was also known as "15th Ammunition Sub Park Company" which served in 17th Corps area of the British Expeditionary Force (BEF) in France and Belgium, with the 15th (Scottish) Division. Frederick arrived in France on 10th July 1915 and was posted to 178 Company which was then in the Ypres salient and was anticipating the Battle of Loos in September 1915. The sub park company was designated to handle ammunition at a rail-head: the end of the line. The ammunition was carried as far forward as possible by train to a rail-head in the rear of the battle area. From there, motor transport took it as far forward as possible by road where it was transferred to a dump for the horse-drawn transport of the Divisional ammunition column to take it forwards to the guns nearer the front, or to airfields.
Frederick was assigned as a "motor driver" and to "general duties". He was "reliable, intelligent and sober" and a "good driver".
It is not clear when he was posted away from 178 Company ASC but it was about the end of September 1915, after the Battle of Loos. He then served with 16th Auxiliary Omnibus Company ASC from September 1915 to 31st January 1917 as a driver of one of the commandeered omnibuses used to transport troops. The 16th Auxiliary Company was formed in August 1915 (apparently from the former Royal Marine Transport Company as it was the Royal Navy and Admiralty who first used London buses for transporting Royal Marines in France and Belgium and the bus drivers became enlisted as Marines). No 16 Company had both Daimler double-decker buses and Daimler single-deck charabancs. There is more on this famous company at:
http://archive.iwm.org.uk/server/show/nav.3213

The Imperial War Museum says a total of 1,300 London motor buses saw service in France. The buses were used for transporting complete battalions or brigades of soldiers (25 men with their kit in each bus), or for ambulance work. By the autumn of 1916, the Army Service Corps had organised the bus drivers into Auxiliary Omnibus Companies with 50 vehicles in each and a total compliment of one thousand eight hundred officers and men. The Army Service Corps became the Royal Army Service Corps in 1918 and its collective Auxiliary Omnibus Park was granted a Mentioned In Despatches for its operational work in Spring 1918 during the German Offensive.
On 31st January 1917 Frederick was posted to No 50 Auxiliary Omnibus Company as a "Daimler bus driver". He was awarded a good conduct stripe on 2nd February 1917, for two years' unblemished service. It was worn on the lower left sleeve. No. 50 Company had been formed at St Valery in the Somme region on 20th Dec 1916. On 23rd February 1918 Frederick was admitted to hospital for an undisclosed reason. He could have been wounded or suffered an ailment. It wasn't serious enough to be returned to England and after four weeks in hospital he spent some time at No 1 Base Depot in France and returned briefly to his unit before being moved to "general duties" at "MTRVP" on 1st July 1918, which I believe to be Mechanical Transport Reserve Vehicle Park (Northern) BEF, which might have been in the Calais area.
After the Armistice, Frederick continued to serve overseas and worked as a lorry driver for 5 Corps Troops Mechanical Transport Company. He moved with the occupying army to Germany and served with the British Army of Occupation on the Rhine with 2nd Army and 365 Motor Transport Company until his return to the UK for discharge from Woolwich on 11th June 1919.
He qualified for the 1914-15 Star, the British War Medal and the Victory Medal.
Kind regards,
Alan
Reply from: Alan Greveson
Date: Monday 8th April 2013 at 9:00 PM

In paragraph 2, "workshose" should read "workhouse".
Reply from: Julie Webber
Date: Monday 8th April 2013 at 9:15 PM

Dear Alan
Thank you so very much, you have given me more information that I could have ever hoped for. I can't wait to show my Mum, she is going to be amazed. WOW.
Kindest Regards
Julie
Posted by: Jeremy Thornton {Email left}
Location: France
Date: Sunday 7th April 2013 at 11:00 AM
Alan,

I read your posts regularly and have noticed that in your reply to Yvonne on the 6th April, you gave her a link to the War Diaries at the National Archives.
As a result I have looked to try and find the diaries for my grandfather Vernon Thornton who served in WW1 in the 12th, 2/5th, 1st & 5th Battalion of the Kings Own Yorkshire Light Infantry and also for my great uncle Julian Thornton who served in the 10th, 2/10th (Scottish) Battalion the Kings Liverpool Regiment with attachment to the 1st Army Musketry Camp, Matringham, then back to the 10th Kings Liverpool Regiment (1st & 2nd Battalions) However, I seem unable to enter the correct details to find any information. Are you able to help me? As my planned visit from France to London in October to visit the National Archives in person is now looking unlikely, I was wondering if there is another way to try and find out more details. Your help would be appreciated.

Jeremy Thornton
Reply from: Alan Greveson
Date: Sunday 7th April 2013 at 12:10 PM

Dear Jeremy,
The UK National Archives has some, not all, war diaries available to purchase online. Diaries that are not online can only be seen at the National Archives itself at Kew. The National Archives does not provide a copying service for war diaries. They do intend to put all war diaries online in the future.
The diaries are catalogued in series WO95 and are filed in order of hierarchy by Theatre of War, Division then Brigade. If a battalion served in more than one division, it will have more than one diary covering the period of war. Some battalions therefore have part of their diary online and part that is not. The online search engine used to be called "Documents Online" and is now called "Discovery" because it now shows more than just the documents available online. On the homepage
http://discovery.nationalarchives.gov.uk/SearchUI/Home/OnlineCollections

the search box is additionally tabbed "All Collections" and "Online collections". To search for war diaries you need to remove the "st" or "th" from the title, so, for example, 12th Battalion King's Own Yorkshire Light Infantry becomes "12 Battalion King's Own Yorkshire Light Infantry" (within quotation marks). This battalion's war diary is not within the online collection. If you click on "all collections" there are two entries for the battalion, as it served in two theatres of war.
The book "The KOYLI in the Great War" by R.C. Bond is readily available and will provide the information on all the battalions in less detail but easier to read and easier to place within context. It can be ordered online (£22 presently offered at £17.60) from the publishers, the Naval and Military Press.
http://www.naval-military-press.com/

Kind regards,
Alan
Reply from: Jeremy Thornton
Date: Sunday 7th April 2013 at 3:02 PM

Alan,

Thank you for this advice. I will buy the book and see how I get on.

Jeremy Thornton
Posted by: Jonboy {Email left}
Location: Harlow Essex England
Date: Sunday 7th April 2013 at 9:26 AM
Hi Alan
Im in a bit of Pickle on this on hopefully you could throw some light on this as ive tried all my pay sites to no avail.
I have my Gt Gt Grandad Walter Sidney Bartlett B1865 in the Grenadier Guards service no 12391 of which you
gave me info on his record.But then when i search for his Son (my Grandad) Walter Sydney Bartlett (spelt with a "Y")
it came up on a medal rolls index card as the same service no as his Fathers.But on the card it only states Walter
S Bartlett.Is there anything you could do on this one please.I do know that my Grandfather Walter Sydney was in the
Grenadier Guards.He was born 1890 in Hounslow Died 1935 in Brentford.He was married to Alice Philippa Louise Franklin.
Regards
Jonboy
Reply from: Alan Greveson
Date: Sunday 7th April 2013 at 3:02 PM

When we first looked at a record for Walter Sidney Bartlett born 1865, the only record was a medal index card showing a Walter S Bartlett served in the Grenadier Guards with the number 12391. It was noted that he would have been 49 years old, which was quite old to be going to war.
If there was a second Walter S. Bartlett who served in the Grenadier Guards, only one of them could have qualified for the medals earned by Grenadier guardsman 12391.
As medal cards do not provide biographical information it is not possible to further identify the soldier without referring to his service record with that regimental number. The Grenadier Guards keep their own records of former soldiers, so application would need to be made to them to identify the two guardsmen.

The spelling of Sidney with an "i" or a "y" was interchangeable and the marriage record for Walter Sydney Bartlett recorded him as Walter Sidney Bartlett who married Alice Phillippia Louise Franklin at St Faith's Church, Brentford, on August 5th 1916. He was described as a bachelor, aged 27, of 104 Murray Road, South Ealing. His occupation was "soldier" and his father was described as Walter Sidney Bartlett, occupation: "soldier".
So in 1916, there appears to have been two "soldiers" both with the name Walter Sidney Smith.
It seems probable that Walter senior did not serve overseas in the First World War and that the medal record refers to Walter junior.
Kind regards,
Alan
Reply from: Jonboy
Date: Sunday 7th April 2013 at 7:21 PM

Thanks Alan
Walters Son (my Uncle) is still alive his memory is not good though but he does know his Dad was in the Grenadiers,so maybe ill take a visit to the Grenadiers see what they can come up with it would make my Uncle Jims day asb he is now 80 and would love to know.Thanks for your help on this one Alan.
Regards
Jonboy

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