The World War Forum (Page 41)

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Posted by: Brenda {No contact email}
Location: East Yorkshire
Date: Monday 2nd November 2015 at 12:25 AM
Hello Alan,
I wonder if you can help me with information about this man please.
Abner Greenbaum born in Hull in 1884 I found these details on a medal card and would like to know a little more of where he served if this is at all possible.
Abner Greenbaum
Service number 202912, 517320, GS/126176
Rank Acting Corporal
Corps Lincolnshire Regiment, Labour Corps, Royal Fusiliers
Service record Soldier Number: 202912, Rank: Acting Corporal, Corps: Lincolnshire Regiment
Service record 2 Soldier Number: 517320, Rank: Acting Corporal, Corps: Labour Corps
Service record 3 Soldier Number: GS/126176, Rank: Acting Corporal, Corps: Royal Fusiliers
Archive reference WO372/8

With grateful thanks
Brenda
Reply from: Alan Greveson
Date: Monday 2nd November 2015 at 6:41 PM

Dear Brenda,
The forename Abner means Father of Light in Hebrew. Abner was the commander of the army of King Saul (1 Samuel 14:50). Abner Greenbaum was not consistently fit enough to fight at the Front and served on garrison duties in England and in France.
The birth of Abner Greenbaum was registered in Hull in the last quarter of 1883. He was the son of Israel Greenbaum from Poland and his English wife, Rebecca Harris whom Israel had married at Hull in 1882. Israel might well have landed at Hull having left the Continent as a result of the anti-Jewish pogroms. Greenbaum is an Ashkenazic Jewish name meaning green tree.
Abner Greenbaum moved from Hull to Great Grimsby, a sea-port on the opposite bank of the Humber estuary, where he married Arabell Walker in 1907. Abner had trained as an apprentice to a printer. In the 1911 census he was described as a photographer and a commission agent; the latter probably being someone who collected life insurance premiums door-to-door like the Man from the Pru. The 1911census recorded Abner and Arabell had two daughters, although it was noted that a Harold Edward Greenbaum was born in Grimsby in 1907 and had died in 1908. The family lived at Duncombe Terrace, Great Grimsby. The Duncombes probably would have been named after the Tory MP for Great Grimsby from 1820 to 1826 who was William Duncombe, of Duncombe Park, Helmsley, Yorkshire.
No individual service record has survived for Abner Greenbaum so it is not possible to be precise about his service in the war. He first enlisted in the 1st/4th Battalion The Lincolnshire Regiment which existed pre-war as a Territorial Battalion based at Lincoln. He was an acting corporal with the regimental number 202912. He also served in the 2nd/4th Battalion Lincolnshire Regiment, which was a second line battalion of reserves stationed in the U.K. until it went abroad in February 1917. He was then attached to 66 Prisoner of War Company of the Labour Corps which would have employed captured enemy soldiers on labouring tasks. 66 P o W Company was stationed in the area of Froissy and Cappy on the Somme in France in December 1917 and January 1918. Abner then transferred to the Labour Corps with the Labour Corps number 517320 and served with the 959 Area Employment Company of the Labour Corps. This company would have served in an Army Corps area handling stores; undertaking labouring tasks; and guard duties. Later, Abner was transferred to the 43rd Battalion Royal Fusiliers with the General Service number 126176. The 43rd Battalion was a Garrison Battalion made up of older and medically less-able men in France. The 43rd Royal Fusiliers was formed in France in May 1918 for duties at one of the five Army Headquarters in France. Abner Greenbaum qualified for the British War Medal and the Victory Medal. As he did not qualify for the 1914-15 Star for service overseas before December 31st 1915, he did not go abroad until some date after January 1st 1916.
As there is no surviving individual service record for him, it is not possible to provide any dates for his service. It is possible he was wounded, or became sick, and subsequently transferred to the Labour Corps and the Royal Fusiliers Garrison Battalion for lighter duties.
It was noted from the Army medal rolls that numerous men from 959 Area Employment Company Labour Corps were transferred to 43rd Royal Fusiliers, probably when it was formed in May 1918. These men had also served with Infantry battalions and then P o W Companies, so it is likely they had all been medically downgraded and transferred from the Infantry to the Labour Corps and then transferred for Garrison duties.
With kind regards,
Alan
Reply from: Brenda
Date: Monday 2nd November 2015 at 7:14 PM

Hello Alan,
Thank you so much for this detailed reply about Abner. It certainly fills in a lot of gaps that my husband
had wondered about. Although not a lot about his full service the details of his origin is fascinating.

Kind regards

Brenda
Posted by: Brian Renshall {Email left}
Location: Rainhill
Date: Sunday 1st November 2015 at 3:58 PM
Alan, I have a medal for Sapper 21133 Ernest.G.Mather of the Royal Engineers,awarded for Bravery in the Field. Can you tell me what he may have done to deserve this ?
Reply from: Alan Greveson
Date: Sunday 1st November 2015 at 8:42 PM

Dear Brian,
Sapper Ernest Mather, 21133, of Rainhill, served with the 23rd Field Company Royal Engineers and went to France with 1st Division as part of the original B.E.F. on 15th August 1914. He was awarded the Military Medal. The award was promulgated in a supplement to The London Gazette dated 7th October 1918 in an alphabetical list under the heading: His Majesty the King has been graciously pleased to approve of the award of the Military Medal for bravery in the Field to the undermentioned Non-commissioned Officers and Men. See:
https://www.thegazette.co.uk/London/issue/30940/supplement/11832
Citations for the award were not published nationally and were given to the soldier with the medal, so it is not possible to state why the award was made. Entries in the Gazette were published some months after the act of bravery had occurred. For the divisional engagements see:
http://www.longlongtrail.co.uk/army/order-of-battle-of-divisions/1st-division/
With kind regards,
Alan

Posted by: Brian Renshall {Email left}
Location: Rainhill Prescot
Date: Wednesday 28th October 2015 at 8:47 PM
Alan,may I through your web site announce that Rainhill Civic Society will be launching a WW1 Web site with details of all the men from Rainhill that died & survived the Great war.In addition there will be information on the VAD Hospitals that were set up and a story about an Autograph Book we unearthed in of all places Canada in which injured men from all over the country and beyond had written.At present only half a dozen or so pages are displayed but it is hoped that eventually more will be added although there will be a 'list' of names of all the men that contributed.The site will NOT GO LIVE until Sunday 8th,November at 12pm to coincide with Rememberance Sunday and will go under the title rainhillremembers.uk.Further information on: www.rainhill-civic-society.org.uk
Reply from: Alan Greveson
Date: Wednesday 28th October 2015 at 9:10 PM

Dear Brian,
Congratulations to your team. We wish you well with your launch.
With kind regards,
Alan
Posted by: Jonboy {Email left}
Location: Harlow Essex England
Date: Wednesday 28th October 2015 at 5:01 PM
Hi Alan
Can you help on this one please, Peter Harrison joined up in the Kings Own Yorkshire Light Infantry around 1916. Sorry no service Number. looks like could have joined in Newcastle in the 1st Reserves and then went on to Ireland.
Kind regards
Jonboy
PS. Luke handed in proceeds of Boot sale (ã47.47p) into British Legion on Sunday so proud of him.
Reply from: Alan Greveson
Date: Wednesday 28th October 2015 at 9:08 PM

Dear Jonboy,
It is not possible to positively identify a soldier in the surviving records by his name only. There was a record for one Peter Henry Harrison born in Leicestershire in 1885 who served in the KOYLI from 1903. He was taken prisoner in August 1914 and remained in Germany until Christmas 1918, so he was not the right man.
If Peter Harrison enlisted in the Kings Own Yorkshire Light Infantry in 1916 in the 1st Reserve at Newcastle then he certainly would have enlisted in the 1st (Reserve) Garrison Battalion of The Kings Own Yorkshire Light Infantry. The Battalion was formed in Newcastle in February 1916. Garrison battalions saw only garrison service and were made up from elderly or medically downgraded men. The 1st (Reserve) Garrison Battalion K.O.Y.L.I. moved to Killingholme, Lincolnshire, in May 1916 and then to Middlesbrough in September 1916 where it remained until March 1917 when it moved to Seaton Carew, near Hartlepool. In May 1918 the Battalion moved to Ireland and was stationed at Berehaven, Co. Cork. These were all coastal stations, so coastal defence duties were likely.
There would not be a medal roll entry for Peter Harrison as England and Ireland were not classed as overseas service in a theatre of war. See also:
http://www.abandonedireland.com/bf.html

Congratulations to Luke for raising funds for the Royal British Legion.
With kind regards,
Alan
Reply from: Jonboy
Date: Thursday 29th October 2015 at 12:03 AM

Thank you so much Alan.
Posted by: Jennyw {Email left}
Location: Brisbane Australia
Date: Wednesday 28th October 2015 at 11:28 AM
Hi Alan,

I am trying to trace my grandfather James John Whitehead (born 6/11/1894 Camberwell) and whether him, his father or his brothers fought in WW1. His father was William John Whitehead (born 1861 Newington, London) and unfortunately all I know about his parentage is that his father was also William John and was a bricklayer (and was deceased by the time William John married Elizabeth Byrne Hewitt in 1886).

During the period of the war James and his brothers would all have been eligible to fight. His brothers were: William Charles (1888), Arthur (1890) and Ernest Henry (1893).

Any assistance would be greatly appreciated,
Jenny
Reply from: Alan Greveson
Date: Wednesday 28th October 2015 at 2:03 PM

Dear Jenny,
It is not possible to search military records by name only as very few records have biographical details. It is necessary to know whether he served in the Navy, Army or Air Force, his unit, and his regimental number.
A William John Whitehead, born 1862, served in the Royal Navy. See:
http://discovery.nationalarchives.gov.uk/details/r/D6636258
A Seaman's record of service exists for a William Charles Whitehead, born at Greenwich, 29th September 1887
http://discovery.nationalarchives.gov.uk/details/r/D6803407
The other names occur too frequently to make positive identification.
With kind regards,
Alan
Reply from: Jennyw
Date: Sunday 1st November 2015 at 9:08 AM

Hi Alan,

Thanks for your quick response. I think the William Charles you found may be my great-uncle as I have a baptism record for him from Oct 1887 in Deptford, Kent.

I have managed to trace my grandfather, James John, and his brother Arthur in the National Roll of the great war. Arthur Whitehead enlisted in August 1914 and was killed in action in France a few weeks later on 27/28 August during the retreat from Mons (He was a corporal in the Royal Field Artillery). James John (J.J) was a sapper in the Royal Engineers and served from 1915 until 1919. I am sure that the records I found are correct as there address is given as 30 Bruce Castle Road, Tottenham which matches the 1911 census record.

After both entries there is a number listed (X18552A(?) for James and X18552B for Arthur). Do these numbers mean anything?

I have found an additional record for Arthur which gives his service number as 51246 - I think this is the right record.

Please can you let me know if there are other avenues that I can pursue given the above information.

Kind Regards,
Jenny
Reply from: Alan Greveson
Date: Sunday 1st November 2015 at 3:52 PM

Dear Jenny,
Arthur Whitehead was baptised on March 30th 1890 at All Saints Church, Hatcham Park, Lewisham, the son of William John Whitehead and Elizabeth. The 1891 England census recorded he was born at Deptford, Kent. The 1901 census recorded he was born at Hatcham and living at Enfield (RG13/1270 folio 87 page 19). The London Borough of Lewisham included St Paul, Deptford and Hatcham. Deptford was in the Greenwich Registration District. The birth of an Arthur Whitehead was recorded at Greenwich in the first quarter of 1891 (vol 1D page 1098). In the 1911 census the entry for Arthur Whitehead at 30 Bruce Castle Road was struck through, suggesting he was not living there. Another candidate for him in the 1911 census aged about 21 was a regular army soldier named Arthur Whitehead, aged 20, single, born Bermondsey, who was serving with the 118th Battery Royal Field Artillery at Aldershot.
The National Roll of the Great War was a commercial production produced for some large cities whose entries were written by the men themselves or their relatives, so it is not considered a precisely accurate source of information. The numbers after the entries are the reference numbers of the publisher. The Roll stated Arthur Whitehead was mobilised in August 1914 which meant he must have been a time-served pre-war soldier on the Reserve who was mobilised at the outbreak of war. The Roll stated he was killed on 27th August 1914, while other records state he was killed on 28th August. Arthur Whitehead, 51246, of the Royal Field Artillery who was killed in action on August 28th 1914 served with the 118th Battery of the 26th Brigade RFA. So he was the pre-war soldier at Aldershot in the 1911 census. He is buried at Etreux British Cemetery, France. Arthur went to France on August 16th 1914, as part of the original British Expeditionary Force. The 26th Brigade RFA was part of the artillery for the British Army 1st Division and was involved in covering the infantry retreat to the Marne which began on August 27th 1914. The artillery Brigade supported the 1st Guards Infantry Brigade which included the 2nd Battalion Royal Munster Fusiliers and the 1st Battalion The Black Watch. The 118th Battery had its guns on the high ground overlooking Etreux in support of the 1st Battalion Black Watch in what later became known as The Rearguard Affair of Etreux. The enemy entered the village of Etreux at 7.30 p.m. on the evening of the 27th August. One of the guns of 118th Battery was destroyed but another went into action at a range of just 300 yards with the task of destroying a house occupied by the enemy. The gunners were within range of the enemy rifles and they were fired on until about 9.30p.m.. The enemy over-ran the position, with the 2nd Battalion Royal Munster Fusiliers fighting from an orchard until their last round had been fired. The next day the enemy granted permission for the British to bury their dead in the orchard alongside the Landrecies road. See:
http://www.cwgc.org/find-a-cemetery/cemetery/2076401/ETREUX%20BRITISH%20CEMETERY
Arthur qualified for the 1914 Star with Mons Clasp; the British War Medal and the Victory Medal and his medal index card identified his address as 30 Bruce Castle Road. The National Roll referred to these medals as the Mons Star, General Service Medal and Victory Medal.

The National Roll entry for J.J. Whitehead does not provide any information that would further identify him in the Royal Engineers.

In the 1901 census, William Whitehead, aged 13, was an electrical machinist and his father a foreman with a telephone company. The family lived at Fotheringham Road, Enfield. In 1911 William was at Bruce Castle Road and was a GPO lineman. A Navy record of service exists for a William Charles Whitehead, born at Greenwich, 29th September 1887. He was a GPO engineer. The record showed he enlisted on 31 May 1915 for the duration of hostilities with the number F5219 and rose to the rank of Chief Petty Officer. He was with the Royal Naval Air Service and served aboard HMS Canning between September 1915 and May 1916 (at Salonika). From 17 May 1916 to 9 January 1918 he served on HMS Ark Royal which was off Salonika and then off the Dardanelles acting as a depot ship for the sea planes of the area. On 27th February 1918 until December 31st 1918 he was under HMS Daedalus. However, as with many other naval establishments, personnel serving with the RNAS at other stations could be administered by HMS Daedalus without actually being physically there. Daedalus was the name of a hulk vessel in the Medway and gave its name as the nominal depot ship for RNAS personnel serving elsewhere. (http://www.fleetairarmarchive.net/daedalus/Ship_namehistory.html)
HMS President II was also an accounting base probably at Crystal Palace.
The service record is difficult to read in parts. It can be downloaded (cost GBP 3-50) from the National Archives website. See:
http://www.nationalarchives.gov.uk/records/looking-for-person/royalnavyrating1853-1923.htm
The record is also available on the Ancestry subscription website.
He was awarded the 1914-15 Star, the British War Medal and the Victory Medal (Navy medal rolls via ancestry.co.uk under Wm C Whitehead).
With kind regards,
Alan
Reply from: Jennyw
Date: Monday 2nd November 2015 at 11:27 AM

Hi Alan,

Thank you so much for your assistance and the information you have provided. Your research work is greatly appreciated.

Kind Regards,
Jenny

Posted by: Charliegw {Email left}
Location: St Thomas Ontario Canada
Date: Tuesday 27th October 2015 at 9:48 PM
Pte. Frederick Arthur Robinson Cockerlin of Manchester (correct spelling) was a member of the Royal Engineers (RE), regimental number 371263 but was transferred to the Signal Corps due to health problems. He claimed in his attestation documents to have previously been in the Duke of Lancaster's Yeomanry regiment. Is any of this correct? What can be verified?
Thanks,
Charlie Cockerline
Reply from: Alan Greveson
Date: Tuesday 27th October 2015 at 11:37 PM

Dear Charlie,
The Signal Service was part of the Royal Engineers. Frederick Cockerlin was a General Post Office telegraphist who was attested into the Royal Engineers on 10th December 1915 by the Army Post Office which was also part of the Royal Engineers. He was posted to the Army Reserve the same day and returned to his civilian job. This indicated he had enlisted under the Derby Scheme of deferred enlistment which was used to encourage those who had not yet volunteered to do so before compulsory conscription was introduced in 1916. These Derby men could volunteer now and serve later. Frederick was not mobilized until 7th December 1917 when he was medically graded B1 (garrison service at home or abroad) and was immediately transferred to the W Reserve of the Army which was for soldiers whose services were deemed to be more valuable to the country in their civilian rather than military employment. In other words, he continued his signal service as a telegraphist with the G.P.O. in Manchester as that was classed as vital war work. He received no army pay and did not wear uniform; although he was liable to be called-up to serve in the uniformed signal service of the Royal Engineers if required. Frederick was discharged from that liability on 14th December 1918. Throughout the war he would have served as a telegraphist with the General Post Office. He stated he had previously served with the Duke of Lancasters Own Yeomanry which was based in Manchester and was a pre-war, part-time weekend volunteer force formed in 1908 from the former Imperial Yeomanry. Any record of his service in the Yeomanry appears not to have survived, which is not unusual.
With kind regards,
Alan
Posted by: Peter {Email left}
Location: Billingham
Date: Tuesday 27th October 2015 at 9:09 PM
Dear Alan Hope you can help with this man George Walter Kirkham 104953 Durham L.I. BWM/VM.
I have three other medals with his name on from The Royal Merchant Seamen's Orphanage, for diving June 1912 / diving for plates 1913 / R.M.S.O. swimming championship medal boys school 1915. Snaresbrook. Best Regards Peter.
Reply from: Alan Greveson
Date: Tuesday 27th October 2015 at 10:43 PM

Dear Peter,
George Kirkham was aged 15 when war was declared and therefore was not conscripted until his 18th birthday in August 1917. He was attested at Newcastle upon Tyne on 27th August 1917 and placed on the reserve until he was mobilized with the Durham Light Infantry on 29th June 1918 and allotted the regimental number 104953. After basic training he was posted on 6th November 1918 as part of a draft of replacements to the 12th Battalion D.L.I. in Italy; three days after the armistice between Italy and Austro-Hungary. The Battalion was stationed at Talponedo, north-west of Pordenone in the 23rd Division. On 21st February 1919, George was compulsorily transferred in the interests of the service to the 8th Battalion York and Lancaster Regiment with the regimental number 56165. The 8th Battalion Y&L was down the road at Porcia, west of Prodenone. He returned to England and was discharged from Ripon in December 1919. He qualified for the British War Medal and the Victory Medal.
With kind regards,
Alan
Reply from: Peter
Date: Saturday 31st October 2015 at 9:49 AM

Dear Alan will there be a record of George' stay at Royal Merchant Seamen Orphanage Snaresbrook of his farther & mother. and his marriage.
Alan. Thank you for all of your help and time over the last two years with men from the Yorkshire North & East Ridings Masonic Lodgers ( Memorial Plaque 54 Men from WW1) We had the Plaque blessed in York Minster and is now displayed in York. With all accounts paid I have funds left over and a Donation of ���ã250. will be presented to Guisborough / Middlesbrough Royal British Legion on December 21st.
Best Regards. Peter.
Posted by: Charliegw {Email left}
Location: St Thomas On Canada
Date: Monday 26th October 2015 at 7:44 PM
Hi Alan:
On 13 August 2015 you sent me information on Pte. William Thomas Renfree Cockerline, 44th Bde. RFA. His discharge date due to wounds was given as 18 August 1915. However, in a Hull Daily Mail article of 22 March 1950 Cockerline stated that he had "...served in France for four years and was demobbed on Nov. 22, 1918." How do you account for this discrepancy?
Secondly, you indicated that he had received the bar plus one rosette to be attached to the "Mons" Star, whereas Cockerline said in the same article that he had received a bar and two rosettes. If so, was he wounded twice on two separate occasions, for example?
Just hoping to clarify some details before I publish anything.
Thanks so much as always, Alan!
Cheers,
Charlie Cockerline
Reply from: Alan Greveson
Date: Monday 26th October 2015 at 9:26 PM

Dear Charlie,
From 1919, recipients of the 1914 Star were entitled to apply for the dated Mons clasp and were entitled to attach a small silver heraldic rose to the ribbon when just the ribbon was being worn. The clasp was attached to the medal suspension ribbon. It was not a bar, as a bar was an indication that a gallantry medal had been earned more than once. The dated clasp was despatched with two small rosette badges, known as Clasp and Roses. Army Order 361 of 1919 stated: (1) His Majesty the King has been graciously pleased to approve of the issue of a clasp to officers, warrant officers, non-commissioned officers and men who have actually been awarded the 1914 Star under Army Order 350 of 1917, and who actually served under fire of the enemy in France and Belgium between the 5th August, 1914, and midnight 22nd/ 23rd November, 1914.
And
(6) Two small silver roses will be issued with the clasp to each approved individual.
The clasp had small holes at each corner and was sewn to the ribbon of the actual medal. However, a soldier might have more than one ribbon bar for separate uniforms. So there was a spare. An Army medal rolls index-card recorded the clasp and roses for William Thomas Cockerline were despatched on 7th March 1950 to 8, Rutland Terrace, Hull. The rosettes were not in any way connected with being wounded.

The medal roll for the 1914 Star recorded W.T.R. Cockerline, 25448, Royal Artillery went to France on 16th August 1914 and was discharged on 18th August 1915. The medal roll for the British War and Victory medals recorded he was discharged TE (time expired) on 18th August 1915. That meant he had served his engagement of seven years with the Army. The records of the Silver War Badge for William Thomas Renfree Cockerline stated he enlisted on 15th August 1908 and was discharged seven years to the date on 18th August 1915 under Paragraph 392 of King�s Regulations, sub paragraph xvi which referred to men wounded and no longer physically fit for war service. His medal rolls index card recorded he had been �discharged� as opposed to demobilized. There is no discrepancy in the records. A Time Expired man was free to leave the Army even during the war. However, some were compulsorily conscripted from 1916. However, being physically unfit for further service would have precluded that. There is no surviving record to show William Cockerline served again. Indeed, it would be unusual for medal records created in 1920 to state only that he was discharged in 1915 if he had served again after that.
Alan
Reply from: Alan Greveson
Date: Monday 26th October 2015 at 10:34 PM

Dear Charlie,
I have just read the Hull Daily Mail article of March 22nd 1950 and note that the reporter wrote that the 72 year old (in 1950) had joined the Army on 5th August 1914 (which was the day war was declared against Germany at 11 p.m. August 4th which was midnight August 4th/5th in Germany) and went to France exactly a fortnight later. Obviously that is not feasible, as no recruit of two weeks was sent to to fight a fortnight after war was declared. Regular army soldiers were sent (The Old Contemptibles or British Expeditionary Force); and William was among them having enlisted in 1908. The writer of the newspaper article refers to Kitcheners Contemptibles which is totally mistaken as the Old Contemptibles were those pre-war regular soldiers who served in 1914 before Kitcheners New Army of civilian volunteers who served overseas from 1915. William Cockerline referred to his medals as bits of iron that had sat in a drawer since the war. The reporter wrote that Old Bill had received a bar and two rosettes to the Mons Star, so he was obviously mistaken as William had applied for and received a dated Mons clasp, and rosettes, to his 1914 Star, in 1950, thirty-one (not thirty-two) years after he could have first applied for them. The character from the war was Ole Bill created by Bruce Bairnsfather and not Old Bill. In England Old Bill is a nick-name for the police. The article is more or less fiction and probably came about as a result of a conversation with William, who was the the newspaper office night watchman, rather than a professional interview based on any facts. (Hull Daily Mail, Wednesday 22 March 1950, Copyright Local World Limited, courtesy of The British Library Board via British Newspaper Archive online.)
I note that in November 1914 a W. Cockerline of the Royal Field Artillery was reported wounded and was returned to England for medical treatment at Fazakerley Hospital, Aintree, Liverpool, (No 1 Western General Military Hospital) on October 20th 1914. (Casualty Lists, Aberdeen Journal, 25th November 1914, copyright D. C. Thompson courtesy of British Library Board, via British Newspaper Archive online). Given the small size of the B.E.F. at this time, Driver W Cockerline RFA would not have been identified further by regimental number although formal casualty lists would have published his regimental number.
With kind regards,
Alan
Posted by: Slater {Email left}
Location: Manchester
Date: Sunday 25th October 2015 at 7:04 PM
I am looking for my grandfathers date of birth He was in the TA prior to enlisting in Aug 1914 into the Lancashire Fusilers. After training at Tuton Camp he was eventually transferred to Gallipoli as a stretcher bearer in May 1915. He was a bandsman prior to joining full time consequently he was a noncombatant
He was killed by a shell in one of the trenches on 25th July 1915. It would appear that the TA and army records held were destroyed in a fire and bombing, so if any body can help it would be appreciated. His Army number was 1868 He resided in Collyhurst Manchester prior to enlisting and was marries with 9 children
Reply from: Alan Greveson
Date: Sunday 25th October 2015 at 9:05 PM

Dear Slater,
Soldier number 1868 Lancashire Fusiliers was William Slater. He was killed 25th July 1915. The CWGC Debt of Honour gave his age as 43. His wife was Elizabeth Ann (Annie). In the 1901 and 1911 censuses he was recorded at Collyhurst. In the 1891 census a matching William Slater was recorded living in Salford with his mother Louisa, a widow. His place of birth was stated as Salford. In the 1871 census a Louise Slater was recorded at Spaw Street, Salford, with her husband, Ralph and two children, Louise and Henry. A William Slater was baptised at Sacred Trinity, Salford on 31st July 1872, the son of Ralph and Louisa Slater of Spaw Street. If you recognise these ancestors, then his birth certificate with the actual date of birth might be William Slater, Salford, July to September 1872, volume 8d, page 126. Certificates can be ordered online from the General Register Office (charges apply). To the best of my belief this information is correct and is provided for educational and personal use only. However, given the frequency of the occurrence of the name William Slater, this reply cannot be guaranteed to be accurate without checking with a copy of the birth certificate. See:
https://www.gro.gov.uk/gro/content/certificates/
With kind regards,
Alan
Posted by: Jonboy {Email left}
Location: Harlow Essex England
Date: Friday 23rd October 2015 at 2:06 PM
Hi Alan
Not sure if you can help me on this one. My Gt Uncle Frederick Nicholls Born circa 1906 in Brentford Middx. I can not find out anything about this person Birth/Marriage/Death other than the 1911 Census states he did exist, what i have got though he was in the Navy and his service No was
W/T op 1st C1, RNR. Dont know if this helps or not.
Kind Regards
jonboy
Reply from: Alan Greveson
Date: Friday 23rd October 2015 at 3:35 PM

Dear Jonboy,
The information you have suggests he was a Wireless Transmission (WT) Operator First Class in the Royal Naval Reserve. As he would have served less than 100 years ago, his record is not available for public inspection other than by making a Freedom of Information application. See:
http://www.nationalarchives.gov.uk/help-with-your-research/research-guides/royal-naval-reserve-service-records-1860-1955/
There were two births registered in Brentford about 1906. One was in 1905 for Frederick Alfred J Nichols. The other was for Frederick Arthur Nicholas (sic) in 1907, who appears to have married Annie Alexander in 1929.
With kind regards,
Alan
Reply from: Jonboy
Date: Friday 23rd October 2015 at 8:06 PM

Hi Alan
Thanks for that im still confused on his full name as the 1911 Census states his name was just Frederick Nicholls , his Parents being Alfred Nicholls and Mary Elizabeth Powney which i know is correct so i suppose its back to the drawing board on this one i had him on my Tree as Frederick Arthur Nicholls but i don't know how i came about with that until i read the 1911 Census it also states he was born in Brentford which has to be right as all his Siblings were born there except his Parents but cant find any Birth/Death records. Thanks anyway i will keep trying as my dear old Dad used to say where there's a will there's a way.
Kind Regards
Jonboy

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