Alan Greveson's World War 1 Forum (Page 41)

Important: To contact someone on this forum, you must leave a Reply to their message, asking them to use the Contact Editor link, giving me permission to release their email to you, and also contacting me yourself. Asking for someone's email will be ignored.
To find any of your Own Messages search for the name you originally used.
If you appreciate Alan's free research please donate to his charity The British Legion

The forum has 247 pages containing 2462 messages
-10   Prev Page   37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 45   Next Page   10+

Posted by: Howard Barkell {Email left}
Location: Lydford Devon
Date: Wednesday 16th October 2013 at 8:24 AM
Dear Alan,
I fear that you may only be able to give an opinion on this one, but I would appreciate that.
W.Lavis from Bridestowe, Devon, served in WW1 because his name is on the commemorative list, but I can find no military record for him. I have traced a Willie, or William, Lavis from his birth c. 1877 to his death in 1936. For most of his life he appears to have lived in the parish and been engaged in the agricultural industry.
After the war when the local War Memorial was unveiled the Comrades paraded under Sgt. Maj. Lavis and he gets other mentions in the press. Do you think it was possible for someone who may have been a Territorial, but not a Regular, to have achieved such rapid promotion? If so, do you think the Medal Card for Willie Lavis, is it RASC, RAVC or RAMC could be for "my" man, or is it going to be one of those maybes?
Kind Regards,
Howard Barkell
Reply from: Alan Greveson
Date: Wednesday 16th October 2013 at 4:44 PM

Dear Howard,
The plaque at Bridestowe was "A tribute of recognition to the men of this parish who fought in the Great War". The names are listed alphabetically and there is one "William Lavis". Those who were killed have RIP after their names. William Lavis survived. Lavis is a Devon surname, a variant of Laver and Lavers which mean "washer-man"; perhaps in a mine.
In the 1911 census there were two men named William Lavis living at Bridestowe. William Lavis senior was born about 1828 and his son, "Willie", was born about 1877. The birth of a "Willie" (sic) Lavis was registered in Jan-Mar 1877 at Oakhampton registration district, which included Bridestowe. He was the son of William and Ann Lavis who farmed at Great Cranford, Bridestowe. The farm appears to remain in the same family today.
There was an Army medal rolls index card for a "Willie Lavis" who served in the Royal Army Service Corps as a Warrant Officer Class II, regimental number R4/068150 where R4 stood for "remounts service" the provision of horses. The card is otherwise blank, suggesting no medals were awarded which might imply service in the UK only. A 40 year-old farmer or horseman could readily have become a serjeant-major (WO II) at a remount depot. Remount depots tended to employ older, more experienced men.
Although there were (in 1901) four men who went under the name of Willie Lavis, who were old enough to serve in the Great war, there was only one man whose birth and marriages were actually registered as "Willie Lavis" and that was Willie Lavis of Bridestowe. It would appear, therefore, that this was his medal index card: WO II in the RASC remounts in the name of Willie Lavis. Of the other William Lavis entries all but two can be eliminated by reference to other records for age, address, etc.. The two others served as private soldiers in the Devonshire Regiment or ASC, so were not serjeant-majors.
However
There was another William Lavis who served as a serjeant-major, was the same age, came from Devon and had parents named William and Ann. Although he was recorded as William Lavis, born 1877 at Newton St Cyres, his birth appears to have been registered as William Henry Lavis at Crediton district (which included Newton St Cyres) in April-June 1876. He can be positively identified as the son of William Lavis born about 1847 and his wife Ann. The father was a game-keeper at Hatherleigh and the family lived at Hatherleigh until after the war. This William Lavis (1876 - 1944) became, at the age of 14, an apprentice drug dispenser to Mr Bridger of Hatherleigh. At the age of 19, William became a full-time soldier in February 1896, enlisting in the Medical Staff Corps, which later became the Royal Army Medical Corps. He served in the Egyptian Campaign in 1898 against the Mahdist dervishes. (A newspaper suggestion he entered Khartoum with General Buller appears mistaken, as that would have occurred in 1885). William then served in South Africa (1899-1902) with the 13 Brigade Field Hospital qualifying for the Queen's South Africa Medal and the King's South Africa Medal. He then served in Ireland where he married. He was promoted to Serjeant Major on 20th January 1915 and during the Great War he served at Gallipoli in 1915 and then in East Africa in 1916 before moving to Salonika in 1917. In 1917 he came to the end of his 21 year contract with the Army and he was granted the rank of honorary Lieutenant and Quartermaster at 52nd General Hospital, Salonika. In 1917, his mother was living at Honeydown Cottage, Hatherleigh. It would seem likely that he would have kept the rank of Lieutenant after the war and he appears to have been associated with Hatherleigh village.
"Willie Lavis" lived at Bridestowe and, after 1919 when the property was auctioned, Willie Lavis lived at "Kirtonia" described as "a well-built residence" of five bedrooms with outbuildings and three acres overlooking Dartmoor. A directory of 1923 described "Willie Lavis" as a private resident of Bridestowe living at "Kirtonia". He was a member of the British Legion, the Bridestowe parish council and the R.A.O.B. (Royal Antediluvian Order of Buffaloes). He died aged 59 after a long illness. His funeral was held on Monday November 30th 1936 at Bridestowe parish church. The RAOB and the British Legion both provided pall bearers, amongst whom were H.J. Barkell and J. H. Barkell.
Of the residents of Bridestowe "William Lavis" named on the plaque would appear to have been Willie Lavis. His father was too old to have served in the Great War.
A Willie Lavis served as a serjeant major (WOII) in the First World War, at a remount depot, apparently in the UK, and after the war served on the Bridestowe parish council, and was a member of the British Legion:- the two organisations that would have organised a commemoration of the war. The weight of evidence points towards this being both the man who would have led the Comrades at the unveiling of the war memorial and the "William Lavis" named on it.
I note there was a remount depot established at Powderham Castle, Kenton, near Exeter, which was commanded by the Earl of Devon's land agent, Lionel Charles Hamilton Palairet (1870 1933) who was a well-known cricketer "generally regarded as the most beautiful batsman of all time" ("The Times" March 29th 1933). On 11th April 1918, the Earl of Devon spoke at the Devon Arms, Kenton, in favour of raising a company of The Devonshire Volunteer Regiment and he appealed to farmers to enlist stating he knew the difficulties they had but that the drills would be arranged for their convenience. The first to enlist was one Lionel Parairet.
From the outbreak of the war, small towns and villages had raised their own Home defence companies which were not officially recognised by the War Office. These were organised by the Central Association of Volunteer Training Corps (VTC). Later in the war, the War Office recognised the VTC units as having a role to play and they became reorganised as volunteer battalions of the county infantry regiments.

Kind regards,
Alan
Reply from: Howard Barkell
Date: Wednesday 16th October 2013 at 7:32 PM

Dear Alan,
What a star! Thank you so much for coming up with the extra information which gives credence to the fact that this man was in all probability the smallholder and the Sgt. Major. I couldn't come up with an alternative, but wanted that extra bit of evidence.
I had discounted the other William Lavis from Hatherleigh as I could find no connection between him and Bridestowe.
Many thanks,
Howard
Posted by: Freddie75 {Email left}
Location: Doncaster
Date: Monday 14th October 2013 at 5:58 PM
My Grandad Joseph William Anderson, was killed 1st August 1915, was 12310 10th Bttn Durham Light Infantry. Just would like to know how he was killed. 25 men were killed on 31st July 1915, from the 10th, in the German flame throwers battle. Do you think you could help, please. We visited Joseph's grave at Sanctuary Wood in July this year. So awful that these men died, and left their families. Regards Fred
Reply from: Alan Greveson
Date: Monday 14th October 2013 at 8:12 PM

Dear Fred,
You would be very fortunate to find a specific cause of death for a soldier other than from privately held family records. Contemporary official records stated a man was "killed in action"; "died of wounds" or "died". "Killed in action" meant he died as a direct result of action while on active service; "died of wounds" meant he had reached the first line of medical care, or beyond, before succumbing to his wounds and "died" meant he had not survived disease, sickness or accident.
War diaries; published memoirs of other soldiers and regimental histories might go into more detail about a particular day's fighting. The 10th Battalion DLI's war diary is held at The National Archives at Kew.
"Soldiers Died in the Great War" (HMSO 1921) recorded that the 10th Battalion DLI lost five men and one officer killed in action on August 1st 1915. It stated Joseph William Anderson was "killed in action". The local newspaper "roll of honour" included, on 20th August, that he had been "killed in action". Local papers sometimes stated the cause of death (e.g. shrapnel) when informed by the family, but not on this occasion.
The 10th Battalion DLI was raised by Lt-Col Hubert Morant DSO whose two volumes of personal memoirs of the war were very recently put up for auction. It would be interesting to know if the DLI Museum was able to secure his diaries. See:
http://www.the-saler...searchitem=true

General histories record that the first notable flamethrower attack was at Hooge at 3.15 a.m. in the morning of July 30 and was followed by a second on the night of 30th/31st July 1915. The 43rd Infantry Brigade, which included the 10th DLI, moved into the front line to relieve the 41st Brigade in the early evening of July 30th. The fighting on Sunday, August 1st may well have been more conventional, but original sources would need to be consulted to bore down and discover such specific information as an individual cause of death on that date. The regimental museum may be able to help. It's in Durham, a short walk from the railway station. See:
http://content.durham.gov.uk/PDFRepository/DLIMuseumbrochure2013FINAL.pdf

Kind regards,
Alan
Reply from: Freddie75
Date: Tuesday 15th October 2013 at 6:13 AM

Dear Alan, Your knowledge is so great. Thank you so very much for the content of your reply. I am going to digest. Thank you. I am going to ask DLI museum if they did get the diaries. I have made a donation to the British Leigon. I am most grateful.

Kind regards

Frederick Kitchener Anderson
Reply from: Freddie 75
Date: Tuesday 15th October 2013 at 6:31 PM

Dear Alan, It is that the Durham and the Northumberland Councils have managed to secure the Durant papers and Diaries, so that they can be seen in the Museum. Thank you for sharing all the important information. Thank you for your help. You are so accessible and easy to communicate with

Kind regards

Frederick Kitchener Anderson
Reply from: Alan Greveson
Date: Tuesday 15th October 2013 at 6:54 PM

Dear Fred,
That's good news. Durham still reveres the Durham Light Infantry (dare I suggest more than Yorkshire does the KOYLI?) so it is appropriate that they have the papers and diaries. The DLI Museum is adjacent to the County Record Office at Durham Country Hall (appointment required) where the DLI archives and photographs are stored as a collection. See:
http://www.durhamrecordoffice.org.uk/Pages/DurhamLightInfantry.aspx

Kind regards,
Alan
Reply from: Alan Greveson
Date: Tuesday 15th October 2013 at 7:02 PM

This is an updated link to the auction of the diaries:
http://www.the-saleroom.com/en-gb/auction-catalogues/anderson-and-garland-newcastle/catalogue-id-2879375/lot-18262363?searchitem=true
Posted by: Trevor Purnell {Email left}
Location: Tillington West Sussex
Date: Sunday 13th October 2013 at 4:40 PM
Hello Alan,

Grateful for your help with William Duck who joined the Sussex Yeomanry c1914 as Pte 1857. The SY later became 16th Battalion Royal Sussex and Pte Duck was promoted via Corporal to Lance Sergeant No TF/320155. From his Medal Card the First theatre of war served in was the '(2D or P) Balkans 7.10.15. I cannot find any details of the Sussex Yeo in the Balkans or how they eventually found their way to France. Just wondered if you could find anything!

Kind regards

Trevor
Reply from: Alan Greveson
Date: Sunday 13th October 2013 at 7:27 PM

Dear Trevor,
William Duck was already a corporal with the Sussex Yeomanry when he first went overseas. This is shown on his medal rolls index card as a blue asterisk next to his entry for the British War and Victory Medals and the marked rank of "Cpl". He was later promoted to Lance-serjeant in the Royal Sussex Regiment. The first theatre of war, dated 7th October 1915 was Balkans which included Greek Macedonia, Serbia, Bulgaria, European Turkey and Gallipoli (The Dardanelles).
All Territorial Force (TF) soldiers were allotted new numbers early in 1917 as part of a rationalisation of the Territorial Army numbering system. William's new number was an infantry, not Yeomanry, number in the range 315001 to 325000 which was allotted to the 16th Royal Sussex Regiment.
Lance-serjeant Duck, 320155, was killed in action on 14th October 1918 in France. William is buried at Aubers Ridge cemetery which was made after the Armistice, by the concentration of graves from the battlefields on all sides of Aubers. See:
http://www.cwgc.org/find-a-cemetery/cemetery/31101/AUBERS%20RIDGE%20BRITISH%20CEMETERY,%20AUBERS

The Sussex Yeomanry dated from its formation in 1900 although its forbears were the Volunteer Cavalry and the Sussex Fencible Cavalry of 1794. The "Fencibles" were raised to protect the homeland from invasion by France and were prominent during the Napoleonic Wars. As part of the Territorial Force, the Sussex Yeomanry existed as a part-time mounted unit before the outbreak of the First World War. Its HQ was at Church Street, Brighton, with squadron stations at Hove, Lewes, Chichester and Hastings. On mobilization in August 1914, The Sussex Yeomanry formed part of the South Eastern Mounted Brigade in Eastern Command and moved to Canterbury where it remained until September 1915 when its horses were taken away and the Yeomanry became dismounted infantry. The Regiment travelled to Liverpool and embarked on SS "Olympic" on September 25th 1915 destined for Gallipoli via Alexandria and Mudros. They landed at Cape Helles on the night of 7th/8th October 1915 and the South Eastern Mounted Brigade (dismounted) was attached to the 42nd (East Lancashire) Division to replace battle casualties which represented two-thirds of the Divisional strength. The Division remained on Gallipoli until withdrawn back to Mudros at the end of December 1915. From Mudros, which was a staging area on the island of Lemnos, in the North Aegean, the Sussex Yeomanry moved via Alexandria, to the Suez Canal Zone of Egypt where the Yeomanry was absorbed into the 3rd Dismounted Brigade on canal defences. In July the Yeomanry became part of the Western Frontier Force in Egypt.
On 3rd January 1917 Sir Edmund Allenby gave orders for the reorganisation of the three Dismounted Brigades of Yeomanry that were in Egypt, and they were designated as the 229th, 230th and 231st Infantry Brigades in the 74th Division which was created near El Arish in March 1917 for the purpose. The Sussex yeomanry became the 16th battalion Royal Sussex Regiment in the 230th Infantry Brigade. The Division quickly went into battle in Palestine at The Second Battle of Gaza (17 - 19 April 1917); The Third Battle of Gaza (27 October - 7 November 1917); The capture of Jerusalem (8 - 9 December 1917); The Defence of Jerusalem (27 - 30 December 1917) and in 1918: The Battle of Tell'Asur (8 - 12 March 1918).
In March 1918 the Division was warned it would go to France to strengthen the BEF after the German Spring Offensive. The Division moved back through Lydda to Kantara and sailed from Alexandria at the end of April 1918 to arrive at Marseilles, France, on May 7th 1918. The Division went into the line around Merville and fought at The Second Battle of Bapaume (Somme 2nd 3rd September 1918); The Battle of Epehy (Battles of the Hindenburg Line, 18th September 1918) and The Final Advance in Artois and Flanders.
Aubers Ridge itself was recaptured by the Allies early in October 1918.
Kind regards,
Alan
Reply from: Trevor Purnell
Date: Thursday 17th October 2013 at 5:57 PM

Alan,

Just a note to thank you very much for your information about Pte Duck of the Sussex Yeomanry. Your help is so much appreciated.

Regards,

Trevor
Posted by: Fred {Email left}
Location: Crickhowell Powys
Date: Saturday 12th October 2013 at 10:33 PM
Hello Alan
I have just come across this site whilst trying to find information on my uncle who served in the RFA in WW1, I have very little info on him as I believe his records were destroyed in WW2. I was wondering if anyone could give any info as to his Brigade/battery, I have the following information
William Buckland L/38375 RFA, I also have a number 163b I do not know if this is a Brigade/battery No, he was awarded the MM but do not know what for.
Thanks
Fred
Reply from: Alan Greveson
Date: Sunday 13th October 2013 at 12:28 PM

Dear Fred,
Unfortunately it is not possible to further identify William Buckland from the surviving information you have. Citations for the Military Medal were presented to the soldier with the medal and copies have rarely survived. The approval of the award was published in the official government publication "The London Gazette" on 6th August 1918 as a list under: "His Majesty the King has been graciously pleased to approve of the award of the Military Medal for bravery in the Field to the undermentioned Non-commissioned Officers and Men: "Sjt W.C. Buckland L/38375 RFA was included in the list. The publication of the award was some months after the occasion on which the act of bravery happened.
The reference to RFA163B is simply a medal nominal roll number followed by a page number (12593) recording the qualification for the British War Medal and the Victory Medal. As he did not qualify for the 1914-15 Star for service overseas before December 31st 1915, he did not serve abroad until some date after January 1st 1916.
It is possible he applied for a pension. The Western Front Association holds an archive of 6.5 million pension record cards (PRCs) which are not available elsewhere. They charge for a manual search of the records. See:
http://www.westernfrontassociation.com/about-the-wfa/175-pension-records/2961-pension-record-cards-manual-lookup-request.html
Kind regards,
Alan
Reply from: Fred
Date: Sunday 13th October 2013 at 2:18 PM

Hello Alan
Thank you very much for trying, I don't believe he applied for a pension so unfortunately no further information can be found.
William Buckland married late and his son (my cousin) another William Buckland is still living, it would have been good to find something. My cousin who is now in his 60s intends to sell his fathers medals and donating the money to the British Legion.
Thanks again for your efforts, a really great forum.
Fred
Posted by: Stephen Mcfarlane {Email left}
Location: Belfast
Date: Friday 11th October 2013 at 11:20 AM
Hello sir can u give me any information on Joseph Newell he died age 47 on 9 nov 1919 of the Royal Irish Regiment he came from Sultan st Belfast thank u for your help
Reply from: Alan Greveson
Date: Saturday 12th October 2013 at 9:14 PM

Dear Stephen,
Unfortunately, no individual service record has survived for Joseph Newell, so it is not possible to suggest his wartime service. An Army medal rolls index card recorded he first served as a private with the Royal Inniskilling Fusiliers, with the regimental number 12117. He first went to France and Flanders on 23rd November 1914, with the Royal Inniskilling Fusiliers. The only battalion of the Inniskillings in France at that time was the 2nd Battalion so it appears Joseph was part of a draft of reinforcements to the Second Battalion which had been in France since 22nd August 1914. For the first few months of their service in France see:
http://www.1914-1918.net/2div.htm

There is no immediate record of when he transferred to the Royal Irish Regiment. His death on 9th November 1919, at Belfast, was listed by the CWGC but it was not recorded in "Soldiers Died in the Great War" (HMSO 1921) suggesting he died as a result of the effects of serving in the war. His death was recorded in Belfast by the civilian General Register Office so he probably died in hospital or at home. He qualified for the 1914-15 Star, the British War Medal and the Victory Medal.
It is possible his widow received a pension and The Western Front Association holds an archive of 6.5 million pension record cards (PRCs) which are not available elsewhere. They charge for a manual search of the records. See:
http://www.westernfrontassociation.com/about-the-wfa/175-pension-records/2961-pension-record-cards-manual-lookup-request.html
Kind regards,
Alan
Reply from: Stephen Mcfarlane
Date: Sunday 13th October 2013 at 7:34 PM

Many thanks to you alan
Posted by: Bella
Location: Esher
Date: Wednesday 9th October 2013 at 6:57 PM
Hello Alan, hope you are well.

Wonder if you can put me on right track. Samuel George Gascoyne, born 1871 (think Southwark) died 11th September 1922 (remember the Lion Tamer?!) Liverpool, buried Ford Cemetery, Liverpool, his wife, Annie, (nee Gosling) born Yorkshire 1880, died Liverpool, December 1941.

What I would like to find out is, how and where do I go to trace the burials of these two, plot nos etc.

Could you help?

Many thanks.

Bella
Reply from: Alan Greveson
Date: Thursday 10th October 2013 at 11:19 AM

Dear Bella,
A cemetery register would record the grave number within a cemetery. Cemetery registers have either been deposited in local city or county archives or are still in use at the cemetery itself. Local authority cemeteries were usually divided into separate areas for Anglican; Roman Catholic and non-conformist deaths in consecrated or un-consecrated ground. In larger cemeteries a cemetery map or plan is required to identify these distinct areas. Often it is necessary to visit the cemetery and ask a keeper or groundsman for assistance as not all plot numbers or letters are marked on the ground. An entry in a cemetery register will identify the deceased by their name, address , age and grave number but an entry does not mean that the relatives erected a headstone or that a headstone is still legible or has survived upright (Many councils lay flat any headstones considered to be unstable and they often lay them face-down). Many Methodists did not believe in pilgrimage and therefore did not believe in having headstones and they might have unmarked graves where the site of the grave has to be calculated by counting the graves and rows from another grave where the number is known from the register, or from a cemetery plan.
Quakers had their own burial grounds where headstones were not always approved of. The advantage of visiting a cemetery is that headstones often recorded additional information, such as the date of death rather than the date of burial; names of relatives buried in the same grave and additional details of relatives, such as married daughters, as well as poetical dedications.
Ford Cemetery is a Roman Catholic cemetery for Liverpool which contains some 350,000 burials. Samuel George Gascoyne was buried in grave number 1072 which, by the date of 1922, appears to be in one of the yellow sections marked on the map at:
http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~liverpoolindexes/maps.html
The cemetery register also recorded him as Samual (with an "a") G Gascoyne, buried (not died) Monday Sept 11th 1922. [Indexed by ancestry.co.uk as Samual G Gascayne (also with an "a")]. Grave number 1072 does not appear to have been exclusive to Samuel Gascoyne. The registers showed Edward J Doyle, aged 16, was buried in grave number 1072 on September 8th 1922; Edward Thompson, aged 78, was buried in grave 1072 on September 9th 1922. The register does not record that 1072 was a new grave (costing £4 13s 6d) or a re-opening and therefore suggests 1072 was a common grave used for more than one burial of people who died about the same time, as was often the case. There is a locally provided search facility for Ford Cemetery which may incur a charge at
http://www.fordcemetery.co.uk/
His widow, Annie, may have been buried at Ford. Other cemeteries in Liverpool are shown here:
http://www.liverpoolhistoryprojects.co.uk/liverpoolrcburials/
Annie Gascoyne's death was registered in Liverpool North registration district in 1941, aged 64, (born 1877). The registration district included: Broadgreen, Everton, Fazakerley, Kirkdale, Mill Road Hospital, Netherfield, Newsham, Walton, Walton Park, Walton Park First, Walton Park Second, and West Derby. Her death certificate would show her place of residence at the date of death.
There is no centralised record of the location of graves so searching requires knowledge of where a person was residing when they died and then doing the footwork to establish which was the most likely cemetery or crematorium that would have been used at the time.
Cemeteries and churchyards are intriguing places to visit but searching for a grave in large cemeteries can be a forlorn hope unless you know precisely where to look, which is why it is necessary to check the most probable cemetery registers and cemetery plans before starting a physical search. Someone locally might be able to provide a search and even a grave photograph for a fee.
Kind regards,
Alan
Reply from: Bella
Date: Sunday 13th October 2013 at 6:08 PM

Dear Alan,

A thousand apologies for the delay in replying to your information reference Annie and Samuel Gascoyneonly have been away for a few days.

Many many thank you's for all your hard work in tracing the details sent. You know it is greatly appreciated.

Again, thank you.

Bella
Posted by: Kez {Email left}
Location: Sydney Australia
Date: Saturday 5th October 2013 at 2:00 AM
Hello Alan,
I am hoping you can help me please. I am helping a friend with his tree and have come across a relie John Fielding Kane, a Capt in the 48th Rifle Regiment died at Madras India in 1880? John's father was John James Kane, Monmouth also a Captain?

I also found another John Fielding Hill Kane. I was wondering if they are the same person. I believe John Fielding Hill was a 2nd Lt. 3Bn Rifle Brigade. He died at Miranshah in 1897.Would this be Pakistan?

Any information you can help me with would be appreciated.

Thanks for your time Kerrie
Reply from: Alan Greveson
Date: Saturday 5th October 2013 at 7:21 PM

Dear Kerrie,
Researching Victorian army officers cannot be fully achieved from a desktop search and requires access to the published annual and quarterly Army Lists on the shelves of national archives. The Army Lists identify where an officer was serving throughout his career, and searching them by quarter and year throughout a 20 year career is time-consuming. Some lists are available digitally. See:
http://www.nationalarchives.gov.uk/records/looking-for-person/britisharmyofficerbefore1913.htm
Army officers of the Victorian period are often only identified by their surname, initials, and date of seniority, so it is necessary to see primary documentary sources which record that information. Regimental museums may be able to help with the history of regiments and their postings.
The two John Fielding Kanes you have found were different people, but they were related as uncle and nephew.
The son of John Joseph and Sarah Ann Kane was baptised at Monmouth on 4th November 1833 as John Fielding Willis Kane. He served as an ensign in the 1860s and purchased his commission as a Captain on 14th March 1868 with the 48th (Northamptonshire) Regiment of Foot. He died on 1st February 1880 at Madras with the 48th Foot.
John Fielding Hill Kane was born at Worcester in 1876, the son of the Rev Richard Nathaniel Kane and his wife Mary. The Rev Richard Kane was John Fielding Willis Kane's brother. John Fielding Hill Kane was a second-lieutenant in the 3rd Battalion the Rifle Brigade. He died on 23rd October 1897 in the Tochi-Valley at Miranshah. This date coincides with the Tochi Expedition. The Tochi Valley was in Afghanistan until 1895 when the area was taken over by the British. In 1910, the British established the North Waziristan Tribal Agency with its headquarters at Miranshah in the valley. The area is now part of Pakistan. The Rifle Brigade chronicle of the expedition is available online at:
http://www.archive.org/stream/riflebrigadechr02owngoog#page/n130/mode/2up
Second Lieutenant J F H Kane qualified for the India Medal with Punjab Frontier clasp (10th June 1897 6th April 1898).
John Joseph Kane, born Lincoln about 1797, appears to have been commissioned in 1813 as an Ensign in the 4th (King's Own) Regiment of Foot and later had been Captain and adjutant of the Monmouthshire Militia. In the 1861 Welsh census he was shown as being on half pay i.e. retired.
Kind regards,
Alan
Reply from: Kez
Date: Sunday 6th October 2013 at 12:46 AM

Many many thanks Alan! Cheers Kerrie
Posted by: Teresa {Email left}
Location: Morecambe Lancs
Date: Thursday 3rd October 2013 at 9:55 AM
Hi I have been doing the family tree for some time and my great uncle Edward makinson 240258 died 30th November 1917 France kings own royal Lancaster regiment he was in the 1/5 battalion but not sure which company he was in. we have found a picture of him in our local newspaper, his body was never found although not down as missing its like he has been wiped from everything and not many records we believe he was also injured in April 1915 but no records has anyone had the same problems thank you x
Reply from: Alan Greveson
Date: Thursday 3rd October 2013 at 3:13 PM

Dear Teresa,
Everyone has that problem at some time as the majority of all First World War records were destroyed in the London Blitz in September 1940. An army medal rolls index card recorded that private Edward Makinson had served with the King's Own Royal Lancaster Regiment with the regimental numbers 1589 and 240258. He entered France on 14th February 1915. The two numbers showed that he had served in a Territorial Force (T.F.) battalion of the regiment, as the T.F. soldiers originally had four-digit numbers which were replaced with six-digit numbers in the first two months of 1917.
The CWGC recorded that on the day he died he was serving with the 1st/5th Battalion King's Own Royal Lancaster Regiment. This was the original 5th Battalion. The 5th Battalion had set off for France on the night of the 14th/15th February 1915 and arrived at Havre on the following morning.
It therefore seems probable that Edward enlisted in and served with the 5th Battalion King's Own Royal Lancaster Regiment throughout his time in the Army.
The 5th Battalion was based at Lancaster and was in the West Lancashire Division. At the outbreak of war in August 1914 it was employed guarding railways around Didcot. In November 1914 the Battalion moved to Sevenoaks before sailing for France in February 1915. On March 3rd 1915, the 5th Battalion became part of 83rd Infantry Brigade in the 28th Division and fought at the Second Battle of Ypres (April May 1915) and The Battle of Loos in September 1915. On October 21st 1915 the 5th Battalion moved to the 2nd Infantry Brigade in the 1st Division. On January 7th 1916 the 5th Battalion joined 166th Infantry Brigade in the 55th Division. This Division was a re-formed West Lancashire Division and was in the Hallencourt area. For the engagements of the 55th Division in 1916 and 1917 see:
http://www.1914-1918.net/55div.htm
Edward was killed in action on 30 November 1917 in the Battle of Cambrai. He has no marked grave and his name is commemorated on the Cambrai Memorial at Louveral. The memorial commemorates the men who died in the Battle of Cambrai in November and December 1917 and whose graves are not known. He qualified for the 1914-15 Star, The British War Medal and the Victory Medal.
Kind regards,
Alan
Reply from: Teresa
Date: Friday 17th January 2014 at 1:08 PM

Thank you for getting back to me and I am so sorry to be a pain edward was injured In April 1915 but there was no record but went back to be major Atkinsons batman why would a batman be fighting? And would there be any record of this many thanks once again xx
Reply from: Alan Greveson
Date: Friday 17th January 2014 at 1:26 PM

Dear Teresa,
Being an officer's batman was in addition to being a soldier. Ernest would have been at Major Atkinson's side when going into the attack. There would be no specific record.
Kind regards,
Alan
Reply from: Antony Atkinson
Date: Monday 12th May 2014 at 7:54 AM

My Grand Father's name was Ernest Atkinson and he was a Major in the 1/5 King's Own Royal Lancaster Regiment. I believe this is the E Atkinson referred to above.
Reply from: Teresa
Date: Monday 12th May 2014 at 9:36 AM

Hi Anthony this if fantastic break through as we have been trying to search for his major just to try and put pieces to the puzzle together. We have been trying to find out as much as possible about my mums Uncle Edward Makinson as family dies and you dont ask questions when you are younger and the only picture we had was that out of the news paper, we have his death medal and the WW1 search has gripped us. Do you have a picture of your grandfather in uniform?. Edward makinson 240256 served in kings own royal lancaster regiment 1/5 battalion he was injured in April 1915 and went back in to serve as Major Atkinsons batman and he was killed 30th Nov 1917 we believe he fell in the Bourlon wood area but his body was never found we are due to visit her on the 26th May I hope this information can give you a little insight into Major Atkinsons Ww1 life thank you x
Reply from: Teresa
Date: Monday 12th May 2014 at 10:22 AM

Sorry Anthony typed his regimental number wrong as it is 240258
Posted by: Howard Barkell {Email left}
Location: Lydford Devon
Date: Thursday 3rd October 2013 at 9:24 AM
Dear Alan,
The local War Memorial was unveiled by Major John Colquhoun Walford, Royal Field Artillery, in December 1921. Apart from the fact that he was married to the squire's sister I have been unable to find out much about him. I'm sure that his various medal cards contain a wealth of information, but need an expert to make sense of them. Perhaps they will give clues to his service during the war. The R.N.bit is intriguing. I await your reply with interest!
Howard
Reply from: Alan Greveson
Date: Thursday 3rd October 2013 at 1:27 PM

Dear Howard,
John Colquhoun Walford was born on May 22nd 1882, the son of Alfred Saunders Walford, a merchant, and his wife, the novelist Lucy Bethia Walford (neé Colquhoun) of 43 Clanricarde Gardens, Bayswater. He attended the Royal Military Academy, Woolwich, and was commissioned as a Second-Lieutenant into the Royal Field Artillery on 23rd July 1901. In 1909, when he married Honora Cecilia Calmady-Hamlyn at Bridestowe, he was with the 149th Battery RFA stationed at Ballincollig, Co. Cork. He was promoted to Captain in July 1914. During the First World War he went overseas to France on 20th August 1914 with the 119th Battery RFA. The Battery was amongst the first to engage the enemy and fought with distinction at Eloges on August 24th where Captain Francis Octavius Grenfell was the first officer in the British Army to win the Victoria Cross in the war. Captain Walford was appointed a companion of the Distinguished Service Order "for gallant conduct at Eloges on the 24th of August, where he was wounded in two places, and at Le Cateau on the 26th of August, where, in spite of pain from his wounds, he showed a fine example in bringing limbers and teams up under a heavy fire" (London Gazette 10 November 1914). In 1916 he was in the Persian Gulf where he was wounded but he later served (in 1917) with the 63rd (Royal Naval) Division artillery in France and Flanders and then the 4th (Army) Brigade RFA. He qualified for the 1914 Star with Mons clasp, the British War Medal and the Victory Medal. He made a series of sketches of the Western Front which are at the Royal Artillery Museum.
The history of the Lydford war memorial has been recorded in the book "War Memorial: The Story of One Village's Sacrifice from 1914 to 2003" by Clive Aslet.
http://books.google.co.uk/books
The memorial is also listed in the UK National Inventory of War Memorials:
http://www.ukniwm.org.uk/server/show/conMemorial.2937/fromUkniwmSearch/1
In March 1929, a Major John Colquhoun Walford DSO, aged 46, was arrested and charged with embezzlement of £150 from the Herefordshire Rural Community Council while he was its secretary. He later pleaded guilty and was sentenced to six months' imprisonment in June 1929. He died, aged 70, in 1953.
Kind regards,
Alan
Reply from: Howard Barkell
Date: Sunday 6th October 2013 at 3:53 PM

Dear Alan,

Thank you for making sense of the various record cards for John Walford and for the extra information which you have supplied. I can now write up a short biography about him as an 'adopted' local, but will probably not refer to the last paragraph!

Best wishes,

Howard
Posted by: Trevor Holmes {Email left}
Location: Bradford
Date: Wednesday 2nd October 2013 at 2:02 PM
Dear Alan

December 2011 I was trying to find some details of my grandfather's brother, F W Hudson and you got back to me with details of his war record.

Recently, our family has acquired a medal which has the number 3336 and the words PTE J.H. Catlow West Yorkshire Regiment inscribed around the perimeter of the medal. It would be appreciated if you could give me any information regarding him. Our family name is Holmes but the word Catlow was added in case anything should happen to him as we believe he had been adopted. If you could throw any light on the subject as to when he enlisted and was de-mobbed. It would be very much appreciated.

Yours sincerely

Trevor Holmes
Reply from: Alan Greveson
Date: Wednesday 2nd October 2013 at 6:57 PM

Dear Trevor,
Unfortunately, no individual service record has survived for John H Catlow so it is not possible to state his military service. An Army medal rolls index card showed he served as a private with the Prince of Wales's Own West Yorkshire Regiment No. 3336 and served in France from 20th August 1915. At some stage he was transferred to the Machine Gun Corps No. 43706. His date of entry into France does not appear to match the arrival of a particular battalion so he may have been part of a draft of reinforcements. A possible source of further information might be The Western Front Association which holds an archive of 6.5 million pension record cards (PRCs) which are not available elsewhere. They charge for a manual search of the records. See:
http://www.westernfrontassociation.com/about-the-wfa/175-pension-records/2961-pension-record-cards-manual-lookup-request.html
Kind regards,
Alan

The forum has 247 pages containing 2462 messages
-10   Prev Page   37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 45   Next Page   10+

Don't forget to BOOKMARK this page to your FAVORITES.