Alan Greveson's World War 1 Forum (Page 41)

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Posted by: Gill Railton {Email left}
Location: Hull East Yorkshire
Date: Friday 18th April 2014 at 8:09 PM
Hello Alan
I am hoping you are able to help me again I am trying to find out something about my great granddads army service I have hit a bit of a brick wall
Charles Edward Fearey was born on 23rd August 1875 in Heckington, Lincolnshire. I had assumed that he was too old to have fought in WW1 but have a photo of him in uniform which appears to be the Army Service Corps, his family had horses and it was possible he took some of them over to France. I am hoping you are able to help.

Thank you
Gill Railton
Reply from: Alan Greveson
Date: Friday 18th April 2014 at 10:31 PM

Dear Gill,
There are no military records for Charles Fearey. As there is not an Army medal rolls index card in his name for the First World War it suggests that he had not served overseas. Being in uniform is not evidence of overseas service or regular army service: depending on the date of the photograph he might have been in the home-based militia or Territorials (does he look like a man of 40?). Any wartime service might have been in the UK only. (It would also be necessary to demonstrate the photograph is of him and not someone else.)
The Army purchased or commandeered horses during the war although individuals did not accompany them as the men themselves became volunteers or conscripts forming drafts of reinforcements to the ever-expanding Army Service Corps. In the 1901 and 1911 census Charles was shown as a carter, which, as the equivalent of today's "Pickford's Removals", would certainly have qualified him for service as a horse transport driver in the Army Service Corps.
One possible further source of information would be if he had applied for a pension after the First World War, a pension record card might have survived. The Western Front Association holds an archive of 6.5 million pension record cards (PRCs) which are not available elsewhere. They charge an administrative fee for a manual search of the records. See:
http://www.westernfrontassociation.com/about-the-wfa/175-pension-records/2961-pension-record-cards-manual-lookup-request.html

With kind regards,
Alan
Reply from: Gill Railton
Date: Friday 18th April 2014 at 10:59 PM

Hi Alan
Thank you for your help I will give the Western front Association a try
Best Wishes
Gill
Posted by: Jonboy {Email left}
Location: Harlow
Date: Friday 18th April 2014 at 5:41 PM
Hi Alan
Hope all is well, i have just come across a Great Uncle of mine and was hoping you could find his Military days for me please.:
Harry W Chimes Born 1899 Oxon Lancashire Fusiliers Regiment No 50034.
Regards
Jonboy
Reply from: Alan Greveson
Date: Friday 18th April 2014 at 10:29 PM

Dear Jonboy,
Unfortunately, no individual service record has survived for Harry Chimes 50034, so it is not possible to state his military service. A Harry W. Chimes qualified for the British War Medal and the Victory Medal. As he did not qualify for the 1914-15 Star for service overseas before December 31st 1915, he did not serve abroad until after January 1st 1916. There is no biographical evidence recorded on the medal index card. Mixbury in Oxfordshire was within the Brackley Northamptonshire registration district. There was a Harry William Chimes whose birth was registered at Brackley Northamptonshire in 1899. By his year of birth he is unlikely to have served overseas until after his 18th birthday in 1917.
With kind regards,
Alan
Reply from: Jonboy
Date: Saturday 19th April 2014 at 5:42 AM

Hi Alan
Thank you for your quick reply.

Kind regards
Jonboy
Posted by: Kez {Email left}
Location: Sydney
Date: Wednesday 16th April 2014 at 11:17 PM
Good morning Alan,
I am researching Albion Julius Morath 1880-1918. He was killed March 1918 in France. I have tried to access British service records, but all it would give me was his No 16293 East Surrey Regt. Can you help me please?
Many thanks Kez
Reply from: Alan Greveson
Date: Thursday 17th April 2014 at 1:08 PM

Dear Kez,
No individual service record has survived for Albion Julius Morath. "Soldiers Died in the Great War" (HMSO 1921) recorded that he was killed on March 23rd 1918 while serving with the 13th Battalion East Surrey Regiment. The Battalion had been raised at Wandsworth, London, on the 16th June 1916 and was serving with the 119th Infantry Brigade in the 40th Division in March 1918. The Division fought at the Battle of St Quentin during the British retreat on the Somme in response to the enemy advance of March 21st 1918. For information see:
http://www.cwgc.org/spring1918/content.asp?menuid=34&submenuid=35&id=10&menuname=St+Quentin&menu=subsub

Lance-corporal Morath qualified for the British War Medal and the Victory Medal. He has no marked grave and is commemorated on the Arras Memorial.
One-page transcripts of Surrey recruitment registers are available on the Findmypast.co.uk website (pay as you go) indexed as A.J. Morath.
With kind regards,
Alan
Reply from: Kez
Date: Thursday 17th April 2014 at 10:24 PM

Many thanks Alan for that information, much appreciated! Kez
Reply from: Jackmorath007 Aol Com
Date: Saturday 16th May 2015 at 5:19 PM

Hello Alan,
Can you advise the e mail of Kez so that I can contact him, as Albion Julius Morath was my Grand Uncle and I have a lot of information about him. Thank you
Jack Morath
Reply from: Alan Greveson
Date: Saturday 16th May 2015 at 5:57 PM

Dear Jack,
All e-mail addresses are protected under the UK Data Protection Act and even I do not get to see them. Kez might have already read your reply. If there is no response see the instructions at the top of the page.
With kind regards,
Alan
Reply from: Jackmorathy007 Aol Com
Date: Sunday 17th May 2015 at 12:47 PM

Many thanks Alan,
I am very keen to contact Kes.
Jack
Posted by: Olwyn {Email left}
Location: Durham
Date: Wednesday 16th April 2014 at 8:02 AM
Hi, Re. Sapper William Ernest Whittle Royal Anglesey Royal Engineers. 397879. My Great Grandfather.
I am searching for information on his whereabouts in WW1. My other GRANDFATHERS, were in the Navy, I found their info on the Arctic Convoys, but am stuck on land.
His records states Campaign BEF 1.2.16-1.1.16. I cannot find out what/ or exactly where this was, where is best to find this please. I keep going round in circles.
His records also state the following: 2.2.16. Arrived at no. 4 from England (GBD), ( someone's initials?)
6.2.16. 3rd Rly Joined unit from base. Thanks to someone I know this is the 3rd Railway Company, anyone know whereabouts. Is he in Ypres?
16.2.16. Admitted to No2 General Hospital.
Raised to Very Superior Rate of EP, 2 shillings. Anyone know what EP stands for? When you think about it , two shillings, ten pence! Bless all these very brave men.
I and my would dearly love to know where he was, and which battles he fought in. I tried searching the war diaries and downloaded the 12th field, which was the wrong one, ( but excellent reading.) A point in the right direction would be greatly appreciated.
Thank you for taking the time to read my message.
Olwyn
Reply from: Alan Greveson
Date: Wednesday 16th April 2014 at 12:00 PM

Dear Olwyn,
The Royal Anglesey Royal Engineers went to France in November 1914. William Whittle enlisted on 22nd July 1915 and would have been part of a draft of reinforcements to the No3 Railway Company Royal Anglesey Royal Engineers. The Company had five officers and 145 men employed on railway construction in France and Flanders. Drafts always passed through a base depot and in this case William arrived at No 4 General Base Depot (GBD) which was at Rouen, on 2nd February 1916. He arrived at the No 3 Railway Company on 4th February 1916.
On 16th June he was admitted to No 2 General Hospital (which was at Quai d'Escale railway station at le Havre).
EP was engineer pay.
On 11th July 1916 he was attached to 32nd Base Park Royal Engineers which was also at Le Havre. On 24th July 1916 he was admitted to No 7 Canadian Stationary Hospital at Le Havre. He was transferred to the UK via No 4 Base Depot on August 1st 1916. He was posted to Class W Reserve for civilian war service with metal sheet manufacturers Camelinate & Co.
To establish where the No 3 Railway Company was during the four months William served with them, you would need to see their war diary which appears not to have survived in full. The National Archives has only the diary from 01 November 1914 - 30 June 1915 in Catalogue Reference: WO 95/4052.
The Royal Engineers Museum at Gillingham has a summary diary 1908 1917.
http://www.re-museum.co.uk/

With kind regards,
Alan
Reply from: Olwyn
Date: Wednesday 16th April 2014 at 8:04 PM

Dear Alan,
What a delight to read your message! Thank you indeed, through you I have learned so much. It looks like it is necessary to visit Gillingham. Do you know if they will do searches as it is unlikely I will be able to visit. If not, I realise I am lucky to have the detail I have. I managed to find some photographs of Le Havre in WW1, including one of the Railway. My family history has blossomed with your help.

One thing puzzled me about William Ernest, it looks like he had formerly served as 6556 2 RW Royal Warwickshire Regiment?

Thank you for seeking and sharing your knowledge.
Olwyn
Reply from: Olwyn
Date: Wednesday 16th April 2014 at 8:44 PM

Hi again Alan,
I have found the summary from the Royal Engineers I had not realised the significance of it earlier.

Many, many thanks.

Olwyn
Reply from: Alan Greveson
Date: Wednesday 16th April 2014 at 8:54 PM

Dear Olwyn,
So he did. He served with the part-time Royal Warwickshire militia and then for a short time in the regular army with the 2nd Battalion Royal Warwickshire Regiment. From your desk you can purchase online 90 "pay as you go" credits on the Findmypast.co.uk website to view and download the coloured images of the records. Search among "military, armed forces and conflict" then click on Record Set "show filters" and tick the box "British Army Service Records", then click on "update". (Findmypast "improved" their website last week and it hasn't been working very well since). There were three men named William Ernest Whittle. The first one you need is the one dated 1881 1899 (30 credits). To view the images, from the results page, click on the camera symbol and after opening the first image click on the forward arrow on the right to see the subsequent pages. Do not click on "transcript" or you'll waste credits. The other two indexed entries appear to relate to the same William also serving briefly in the part-time militia (30 credits each).
I am afraid I am not allowed to transcribe details from the Findmypast website, as that would breach their copyright rules, but you should find the records self-explanatory.
The Royal Engineers Museum suggests a list of professional researchers who could transcribe or photograph part of a war diary for you. See:
http://www.re-museum.co.uk/research
and click on "professional researchers" within the text of the paragraph titled "Help with research".
Don't be put off by approaching a professional. Simply ask how much they'll charge. The nearer they are to the museum, or the more frequently they visit, the fewer costs incurred.
With kind regards,
Alan
Reply from: Olwyn
Date: Wednesday 16th April 2014 at 11:10 PM

Hi Alan,
Thanks, I just followed your instructions and have this record. Today has been an excellent day, it got better as it went on. Just amazing!
Looks like 'our William' lied about, or perhaps forgot his age.
I will take your advice on a researcher, already spent many, many hours researching 'The Whittles of Warwickdhire', I may as well do it properly.

Thank you,
Olwyn
Reply from: Olwyn
Date: Wednesday 16th April 2014 at 11:22 PM

Donation sent to your charity, in thanks.

Kind regards,

Olwyn
Reply from: Alan Greveson
Date: Friday 25th April 2014 at 9:31 PM

Dear Olwyn,
I have overlooked to say "thank you" for making a donation to the Royal British Legion. I correct that now. Thank you.
With kind regards,
Alan
Reply from: Olwyn
Date: Friday 25th April 2014 at 10:25 PM

Thank you, Alan.

Kind regards
Olwyn
Posted by: Dee {Email left}
Location: Hull
Date: Tuesday 15th April 2014 at 6:51 PM
Hello Alan. I wonder if you could help with a query. I am trying to find out more info on an ancestor. His name is John Dunn born South Cave, East Yorkshire. He served 15th foot army 1807-1816 and was discharged age 39. I got this info on Nat archive site.
Thank you
Regards Dee
Reply from: Alan Greveson
Date: Tuesday 15th April 2014 at 7:02 PM

Dear Dee,
Any service record would be held at The National Archives in catalogue reference
WO 97/362/112 or available online from the subscription website Findmypast.co.uk.
With kind regards,
Alan
Reply from: Dee
Date: Tuesday 15th April 2014 at 7:25 PM

Dear Alan,
Thank you so much for your very prompt reply. Will check on findmypast, as I subscribe.
Regards . dee
Posted by: Barbara Jacques {Email left}
Location: Failsworth Manchester
Date: Sunday 13th April 2014 at 3:58 PM
Dear Alan

I have read with interest your very knowledgeable replies to requests for information on soldiers of the Great War. It clearly is a labour of love for you and something that is essential for all years not just the hundredth anniversary.

My grandfather died on Thursday, 28th March 1918, during Kaiserschlact, and have been to the Arras Memorial and seen his name on Bay 5 as he has no known grave.

His name was Pte 45257 Matthew Lloyd, 2 Bn Lancashire Fusiliers. I think he had only been in France since 12th March

He was conscripted, but, as conscription had been in place since January 1916, what I wish to know is why did he not get called up to late 1917, and why did he enlist at Cleckheaton, when he was joining the Lancashire Fusiliers and lived in Failsworth Manchester. He was a mill worker would that have exempted him from being conscripted before then?

I have a photograph of him in his uniform with my grandmother and my father and one taken with some comrades both of which are studio pictures. I have no oral history of him from my father who is also deceased and cannot find any reference to him in local papers of the time nor in any local book of remembrance.

I hope you can help and look forward to hearing from you. Keep up the good work

Barbara Jacques
Reply from: Alan Greveson
Date: Sunday 13th April 2014 at 6:27 PM

Dear Barbara,
No individual service record has survived for Matthew Lloyd so it is not possible to state his military service. Without an individual record, it is unwise to speculate about his circumstances.
The 2nd Battalion's war diary is available (charges apply) in three parts from the National Archives. See:
http://discovery.nationalarchives.gov.uk/SearchUI/s/res?_q=%222+Battalion+Lancashire+Fusiliers%22&_p=1900&Refine+dates=Refine

With kind regards,
Alan
Reply from: Barbara Jacques
Date: Monday 14th April 2014 at 2:08 PM

Dear Alan,
Thank you very much for your prompt reply. I will order the document from National Archives.

Kind Regards,
Barbara
Posted by: Alexander {Email left}
Location: Retford Notts
Date: Saturday 12th April 2014 at 8:50 AM
Hello Alan

Could you please shed any light onto my Great Uncle Mr Roland Lever, he served during WW1 but I have been unable to find his service record.
My mum remembers from when she was a girl, that he returned from the trenches in France and he spent many years in hospital.
I have found some information and have his service number unit and war badge number, he was from Barford St Martin in Wiltshire.
I know he married one of the nurses at his recovery hospital and that they emigrated to Michigan USA, where the family now live (now levere!)
Ser-No. 140172 R.E 3rd Res Battalion, war badge number 396324. he was discharged suffering from "Neurasthesia"
It would be nice to know where and what he was doing during WW1.
Thank you.
Reply from: Alan Greveson
Date: Saturday 12th April 2014 at 8:31 PM

Dear Alexander,
Unfortunately, no individual service record has survived for Roland Lever 140172 Royal Engineers, so it is not possible to state his wartime service. He had enlisted on 8 November 1915 and was discharged on 23rd May 1918 suffering neurasthenia, a term used to describe shell shock. The unit from which he was discharged was No 3 Reserve Battalion Royal Engineers which would have been the UK-based unit that administered his discharge.
With kind regards,
Alan
Posted by: Mike Carragher {Email left}
Location: Queens Ny
Date: Friday 11th April 2014 at 1:49 PM
Hi,

Looking for more info on my relative Peter Joseph Moore who died 22 Sept 1918.

Corporal, 1st Battalion, East Lancashire Regiment. Died of wounds. Son of Patrick and Mary Moore, of Annahale, Castleblayney, County Monaghan. Age: 30.

http://carragherfamily.org/getperson.php?personID=I355&tree=Moneyvolan1

Thanks,
Mike Carragher
Reply from: Alan Greveson
Date: Friday 11th April 2014 at 8:33 PM

Dear Mike,
No individual service record has survived for Peter Moore so it is not possible to state his wartime record. Most records were destroyed in an air on London in 1940. Peter appears to have been a regular soldier in the 2nd Battalion East Lancashire Regiment. An Army medal rolls index-card showed he served with the 2nd Battalion and entered a theatre of war on 6th November 1916. The 2nd Battalion was in Wynberg, South Africa at the outbreak of war and sailed from Cape Town on 1st October to arrive in the UK on 30th October 1914. They served in the 24th Infantry Brigade in the 8th Division and landed in France on 6th November 1914.
"Soldiers Died in the Great War" (HMSO 1921) recorded he died of wounds on 22 September 1918 while serving with the 1st Battalion East Lancashire Regiment. It is not possible to say when he was posted from one battalion to another, so it is not possible to state where he served or when he was wounded.
He qualified for the 1914 Star with dated Clasp, the British War Medal and the Victory Medal.
He was buried at Terlincthun cemetery. The CWGC says: "The cemetery at Terlincthun was begun in June 1918 when the space available for service burials in the civil cemeteries of Boulogne and Wimereux was exhausted. It was used chiefly for burials from the base hospitals."
With kind regards,
Alan
Posted by: Confused Com {Email left}
Location: Burnley
Date: Thursday 10th April 2014 at 12:28 PM
Any information about Private Fred Stevenson 241428 2/5 East Lancs. Born 21/9/1897.Lived at 6,Devonshire Rd .Burnley.Lancs. Confused with whole structure of army...brigades,divisions,regiments!Any info would be greatly appreciated!
Reply from: Alan Greveson
Date: Thursday 10th April 2014 at 4:33 PM

Unfortunately, no records have survived for Fred Stevenson (or variations of that name) 241428 so it is not possible to state his service.
With kind regards,
Alan
Reply from: Confused
Date: Thursday 10th April 2014 at 4:51 PM

Thanks Alan for the quick response.

I have actually discovered Fred served in the 42nd East Lancs 2/5...not sure what the 2/5 refers to...can you help?

Would also be interested in any information at all on this.

Best regards,

Confused.
Reply from: Alan Greveson
Date: Thursday 10th April 2014 at 4:56 PM

His regimental number was allotted to the 2nd/5th Battalion East Lancashire Regiment in 1917 but there is no record of his actually serving. As his records have not survived it is not possible to speculate.
With kind regards,
Alan
Reply from: Confused
Date: Thursday 10th April 2014 at 5:00 PM

Thanks Alan - you are an absolute star...the service you provide is "first class"

Thanks again.
Reply from: Confused
Date: Thursday 10th April 2014 at 8:21 PM

Alan,

Sorry about this but I think I may have given you the incorrect regimental number before...think it was 241426 and not 241428.

Do you have any information on a Fred Stevenson with the number 241426?

Thanks.
Reply from: Alan Greveson
Date: Friday 11th April 2014 at 10:54 AM

There is still no surviving evidence for Fred with the number 241426. The number would have been allotted to the 2nd/5th East Lancashire Regiment in early 1917. There is no Army medal rolls index-card at either the National Archives or on the ancestry.co.uk website, which were filmed at different times from the originals, suggesting that he did not qualify for any medals, therefore he did not serve overseas, but without an individual service record that cannot be verified.
With kind regards,
Alan
Reply from: Confused
Date: Thursday 17th April 2014 at 12:07 PM

Alan,

On the "Burnley in the Great War" website, my Grandfather is list on the men who surved and survived listing, the details of which are:
Stevenson Fred 241426 Pte E Lancs_4 TF Devonshire Rd 6

NB - Fred was living at 6 Devonshire Road Burnley Lancs when he joined up.

I am totally confused now as I also have a picture of Fred in the East Lancs Regiment uniform so he definitely served in the was and oral history tells me that he served in France and was involved in the 3rd Battle of Ypres.

Could you help in explaining why you think he did not serve over seas when we know he did.

Look forward to hearing from you.

Best regards,

Russ.
Reply from: Alan Greveson
Date: Thursday 17th April 2014 at 1:07 PM

Dear Russ,
There is no Army medal index card for Fred Stevenson 241426 which means there is no record of his overseas service, although that doesn't mean he did not serve overseas, only that his service can't be verified from the existing records.
If he applied for a pension there may be a pension record card for him.The Western Front Association holds an archive of 6.5 million pension record cards (PRCs) which are not available elsewhere. They charge for a manual search of the records. See:
http://www.westernfrontassociation.com/about-the-wfa/175-pension-records/2961-pension-record-cards-manual-lookup-request.html

With kind regards,
Alan
Posted by: Peter {Email left}
Location: Billingham
Date: Wednesday 9th April 2014 at 6:22 PM
Dear Alan.
My sister in law asked if John McManus are all the one man. her Grandmothers brother
Kings Royal Rifle Corps Y/1501.
London Regiment G/84024.
Royal Engineers 30686
Royal Fusiliers G5/84024
Best Regards Peter.
Reply from: Alan Greveson
Date: Wednesday 9th April 2014 at 9:31 PM

Dear Peter,
They refer to one and the same man: Rifleman John McManus. No individual service record appears to have survived for him so it is not possible to state his service. The four numbers indicate a change of regiments during the war. An Army medal rolls index-card recorded he had the regimental number Y/1501 where the "Y" suggested he was in the special reserve of the King's Royal Rifle Corps. He first served in France and Flanders with the 7th Battalion the King's Royal Rifle Corps (7th Bn KRRC) from 3rd August 1915. The 7th Bn KRRC served with the 41st Infantry Brigade in the 14th Division until 2nd February 1918 when it moved to the 43rd Infantry Brigade in the 14th Division. For the Division's history see:
http://www.1914-1918.net/14div.htm

It is not possible to say when Rifleman McManus transferred to the 2nd (City of London) Battalion London Regiment (Royal Fusiliers) with the general service (G) number 84024. The 2nd London Regiment (Royal Fusiliers) was in the 169th Brigade in the 56th Division. See:
http://www.1914-1918.net/56div.htm

It is worth noting the 7th Bn KRRC was reduced to an administrative cadre on 25th April 1918, which is a possible occasion for a transfer. After a period with the 2nd London Regiment (Royal Fusiliers) he went to the Royal Engineers. Many men made that move, especially if they had a particular manual skill. He then returned to his old number (the GS was the same as G for general service) 84024 with the 2nd London. That final move might have been after the Armistice, so that his commitment to the Reserve was with his London regiment.
Without a service record it is not possible to provide evidence for the timing of the above moves, but the outline of events is worth noting for further research.
John McManus qualified for the 1914-15 Star, the British War Medal and the Victory Medal.
With kind regards,
Alan
Reply from: Peter
Date: Wednesday 9th April 2014 at 10:01 PM

Dear Alan Thank you for the Information on john McManus My sister in law will be delighted with this news.
best Regards Peter.

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