The World War I & II Forum (Page 36)

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Posted by: Howard Barkell {Email left}
Location: Lydford Devon
Date: Friday 8th January 2016 at 2:02 PM
Dear Alan,
I hope the sun is shining on you as it is here at the moment.
I am interested in Arthur Meadows, 9164, Northamptonshire Regiment. As he died on 9 May 1915 I wonder if the word Died rather than KiA on his record card has any significance and whether his name on the memorial at Ploegsteert gives any extra clues.
Kind regards,
Howard
Reply from: Alan Greveson
Date: Saturday 9th January 2016 at 3:35 PM

Dear Howard,
Arthur Meadows lived with his mother and her parents, in 1901, at Grubbs Green, Welton, Daventry. His mother, Netta, was Netta Rainbow who had married Jethro Meadows. In 1911, Arthur Meadows was recorded as a private soldier with the 1st Battalion Northamptonshire Regiment at South Raglan Barracks, Devonport. His father appears to have re-married in 1915 to a Sarah Roach.
At the outbreak of the war, the 2nd Battalion Northamptonshire Regiment was at Alexandria in Egypt. They returned to England in October 1914 and joined the 8th Division at Hursley Park, Winchester, before sailing for France on the night of the 5th/6th November 1914. Arthur’s medal rolls index-card recorded he entered France on that date. The 8th Division fought at the Battle of Neuve Chapelle in March 1915 and then at Aubers Ridge on May 9th 1915. On May 9th at 5.50 a.m. the 2nd Battalion advanced and immediately came under heavy machine gun fire. The battalion pushed on but only part of “D” Company reached the enemy trenches. “A” Company was all but wiped out and “D” Company, following up shortly afterwards came under heavy fire. “C” Company, in reserve, was unable to leave the orchard in which they were assembled because of machine gun fire and they withdrew. The men spent the day exposed to shell fire and after darkness fell at 8 p.m. the wounded were withdrawn by stretcher bearers at night. At 9.15 p.m. the remainder of the 2nd Battalion was withdrawn to Rue de Bout where they remained in assembly trenches the next day. On May 11th the Battalion went into billets in the village of Laventie. The 2nd Battalion lost half its strength on May 9th with 63 men killed, 154 wounded and 197 missing. Including officers, the total lost on the day was 426 officers and men.
The medal records for Corporal Meadows, compiled after the war, state he had “died” which usually meant a man had died from a cause other than enemy action. Such deaths were either by accident or sickness and the man would usually have a marked grave. “Soldiers Died in the Great War” (HMSO) stated Arthur Meadows was killed in action in May 9th. The Army Register of Soldiers’ Effects recorded: “death presumed on or since 9.5.15”.
Given the Battalion was in action and suffered heavy losses with 197 men missing on May 9th, it is probable Arthur Meadows was killed in action at Aubers that day.
Corporal Meadows qualified for the 1914 Star with dated clasp; the British War Medal and the Victory Medal. His next-of-kin and legatee was his father, Jethro Meadows, of Fore Street, Bridestowe, Devon.
With kind regards,
Alan
Reply from: Howard Barkell
Date: Saturday 9th January 2016 at 6:53 PM

Dear Alan,

Thank you for your usual comprehensive reply to my query and for all the extra detail concerning that day and Arthur's earlier life. Much appreciated.

Howard
Posted by: Young Buzzard {Email left}
Location: Newton Abbot
Date: Thursday 7th January 2016 at 4:22 PM
Hi Alan,

Happy New Year.
Just a quick question today, can you say if Guy Bourchier Sayer who joined the Navy at the age of 13 years in 1916 would have seen service during the Great War?. I know he became a Midshipman in 1920
and went on to have a distinguished Naval Career ending as Flag Officer Commanding Reserve Fleet when he retired in 1958.It is the very earliest part of his career that is of interest.
Thanks in advance for your help.
Reply from: Alan Greveson
Date: Thursday 7th January 2016 at 5:22 PM

Dear Young Buzzard,
Guy Sayer was born on January 2nd 1903. He attended Cholmondeley House, Highgate, for six months at the age of 13 and then continued his studies from 1916 as a junior naval cadet at the Royal Naval College Osborne on the Isle of Wight where junior cadets studied for two years before moving on to the Britannia Royal Naval College at Dartmouth where they spent a further two years as a Naval Cadet. In all, cadets underwent four years’ training before going to sea at the age of 17. On passing out of Dartmouth, Guy Sayer was appointed a Midshipman in 1920 and then Acting Sub-Lieutenant on 15th May 1923 and Sub-Lieutenant on 15th November 1923. His career after that is well documented until he retired as Flag Officer Commanding Reserve Fleet (1958–59). He died in 1985.
With kind regards,
Alan
Posted by: Bella {No contact email}
Location: Esher
Date: Monday 4th January 2016 at 7:50 PM
Dear Alan,

I hope you not suffering too much from the flooding and that you are alright.

Want to find out who lived at 37 Bruce Castle Road, Tottenham, London in 1939,

It was either a George Green or a Charles Shipton and were there others in the house.

Can you help or advise?

With kind regards.
Bella
Reply from: Alan Greveson
Date: Monday 4th January 2016 at 8:05 PM

I am warm and dry thanks, Bella. But you should see the mountains of "wreckage" piled on the pavements as people try to clear up. Overflowing skips everywhere.
There's a catch to the 1939 register: it costs money. £6.95 per household.
You should also be aware there are restrictions on what is shown. Anyone born within the last 100 years is not shown, and about a third of all household entries are officially closed. The Findmypast website has the searchable index: See:
https://blog.findmypast.co.uk/28-million-more-records-now-available-to-view-in-the-1939-register-1519705685.html

All the best for 2016
Alan
Reply from: Bella
Date: Tuesday 5th January 2016 at 9:33 AM

Dear Alan,

Glad to hear you ok and thanks for info.

With kind regards.

Bella
Reply from: Rosemary
Date: Wednesday 2nd March 2016 at 12:08 AM

Hi Bella. Charles Shipton, George and Nellie Green were living at 51 Bruce Castle Road on 1939 census, not 37. I am researching Shipton and not sure if this is a Charles Shipton on my tree. What is your interest? Hope this helps and look forward to hearing from you.
Reply from: Rosemary
Date: Wednesday 2nd March 2016 at 12:28 AM

Sorry, I forgot to ask that you give permission to the editor that I can contact you by email.
Posted by: Maurice Simms {Email left}
Location: Whitby Ontario Canada
Date: Saturday 2nd January 2016 at 10:31 PM
Hello, Alan.

Happy New Year.

I would much appreciate your help with another inquiry:

Allan Church 1893-1944, British West Indies Regiment. Rank Sergeant. Number 4574.

Medals Rolls Index Cards (attached):

Victory, COL/112 B4, page 135
Britain, do do

Thank you.

Maurice.

P.S. I've just read the previous post. The story you uncovered is a remarkable piece of detective work.

Maurice Simms
(mandasimms at bell dot net)
905-728-0868
Reply from: Alan Greveson
Date: Sunday 3rd January 2016 at 7:47 PM

Dear Maurice,
The only surviving documentation for Sergeant Allan Church is his medal rolls index card which showed he qualified for the British War Medal and the Victory Medal and the actual Army medal roll which recorded he served with the 4th Battalion British West Indies Regiment (B.W.I.R.) as a sergeant.
The B.W.I.R. was created in 1915 and the 4th Battalion was raised during the war by recruiting from the West Indies. The men had travelled to Taranto in Italy where they unloaded ammunition from ships and moved it onto trains. By the end of 1917 they were warned they would go to France to continue their labouring work there. In January 1918 they moved to Marseilles in the south of France where the B.W.I.R. maintained a base depot at Mont Furon. In April 1918, the 4th Battalion was posted to the British Third Army area of operations to be used as labouring troops, initially under the command of VI Corps. On May 1st 1918 the 4th Battalion B.W.I.R. arrived at le Bac de Sud near Bailleulval which is a village in the Department of the Pas-de-Calais about 13 kms (eight miles) south-west of Arras.
The Battalion consisted of a HQ and four companies each of some 240 men. Companies and smaller detachments of men were employed on frequently changing rosters at ammunition dumps where they unloaded ammunition trains and stacked the shells before they were distributed to the guns.
Initially he men were working at Euston Dump, at Coullemont; Paddington Dump at Mondicourt; Roadside Dump at Riviere (all south-west of Arras; and King’s Cross Dump at Ervillers, south of Arras. Apart from “Roadside”, these dumps were named after the main London railway stations. Men also worked at Authie, Acheux, near the Somme battlefield and La Bezeque Farm.
Shortly after starting work in May 1918, the commanding officer was horrified to discover the men of one company had been ordered to handle gas shells without being issued with respirators. The matter was quickly remedied. At the end of May and beginning of July 1918 there was an epidemic of influenza which saw 77 men sent to hospital. Some men caught measles and all suffered from white lice, so they cut off their hair.
On July 2nd 1918 an enemy aircraft dropped bombs on the dump at La Bezeque Farm (near Bienvillers) and made a direct hit on a stack of 8-inch cartridges. The whole of “B” Company turned out to fight the fire which caused five men to be wounded, one of them seriously.
On 17th July the Battalion HQ was moved from Bac de Sud to Le Gros Tison Farm at Mondicourt, while the men continued to work between the various ammunition dumps.
None of the men were killed during their work, but a further three were wounded by an enemy shell exploding nearby at Bapaume. Four men died of sickness: dysentery; bronchitis; pneumonia and a carotid artery aneurysm (where a weak part of artery bulges like a balloon with each heart-beat and can burst).
Work continued as routine until the end of September 1918. On 12th September, the Battalion HQ moved to Ayette 14 kilometres south of Arras on the Bucquoy road. From the beginning of October, Company locations changed to include Beetroot Dump, Henin Dump, and Louveral Dump (near Doignies between Bapaume and Cambrai). Other locations were at Manancourt, Hautcourt and Lesdain (Cambrai). Towards the end of October the Battalion was congratulated on its work by the Labour Commander of V Corps. On October 29th the Battalion received a warning order it would move to Bapaume and concentrate there for a move to Italy.
On November 1st 1918 the Battalion (less “B” Company) entrained at Bapaume railway station and departed at 8 p.m. for Rouen where they arrived at 3 p.m. the next day: that’s a train journey of 19 hours. Today the train journey is two hours and four minutes. At Bapaume they marched to No 10 Rest Camp where they met up again with “B” Company. On November 4th they entrained at Rouen and travelled to Taranto in the south of Italy. Fighting in Italy ended on November 4th 1918. Their journey took eight days. They settled at Cimino Camp at Taranto on November 12th 1918, the day after the Armistice with Germany was signed. From 20th November 1918, leave parties of 30 men were allowed absence of leave to England.
The B.W.I.R. concentrated at Taranto after the war had ended and continued their labour work there before they returned home as late as September 1919. Taranto was a very extensive logistics centre which served the Italian, Egyptian and Salonika theatres. During their stay at Taranto some members of the 9th and 10th Battalions of the Regiment took part in a four-day mutiny in December 1918. The B.W.I.R. had been ordered to clean the latrines of Italian workers which was the last straw in their argument for equal pay with white soldiers who had received a pay rise, and an end to discrimination. They Regiment returned to the West Indies without acknowledgement. A poem written by an anonymous trooper, entitled The Black Soldier's Lament, showed their disappointment:
Stripped to the waist and sweated chest
Midday's reprieve brings much-needed rest
From trenches deep toward the sky.
Non-fighting troops and yet we die.
For some general information about the raising of the Regiment see:
http://www.iwm.org.uk/history/how-the-west-indies-helped-the-war-effort-in-the-first-world-war
With kind regards,
Alan
Reply from: Maurice Simms
Date: Tuesday 1st March 2016 at 7:28 PM

Alan.

My belated thanks for your exceptional research re my mother's father, Allan Andrea Church.
Much, much appreciated.

Maurice.

Posted by: Lesley {Email left}
Location: London
Date: Saturday 2nd January 2016 at 4:46 PM
Hi there,

I am trying to help my father find out further information about his grandfather - Thomas Howard born 28 Sept 1882 in Buckingham.

Thomas first served in the 11 Hussars no 27248 and then went on to a Middlesex Regiment 413180, however he was discovered to have fraudulently enlisted into the Hussars on the 7/11/1914. We are trying to find out if he served a prison or detention sentence and what the circumstances surrounding the enlistment are. We wonder if you able to help?

Kindest regards

Lesley
Reply from: Alan Greveson
Date: Saturday 2nd January 2016 at 8:29 PM

Dear Lesley,
No individual service record has survived for Thomas Howard so it is not possible to state his service in detail. The Army medal rolls recorded Private Thomas Howard, regimental number L/13180, served initially with the 2nd Battalion The Duke of Cambridge’s Own (Middlesex Regiment) and he first entered France with them on 7th November 1914. That date was recorded on the medal rolls for the 1914 Star. It is also the date the 2nd Battalion disembarked from England at Havre. From that it is probable Thomas Howard was a pre-war regular soldier serving in the 2nd Battalion Middlesex Regiment which was in Malta at the outbreak of war, or he joined them as a recruit in England in 1914. The Battalion returned to England from Malta and joined the 23rd Infantry Brigade in the 8th Division at Hursley Park in Hampshire. The Battalion arrived in France on 7th November 1914 and eventually fought at The Battle of Neuve Chapelle (1915); The Battle of Aubers and the The Action of Bois Grenier which was a diversionary attack coinciding with the Battle of Loos on September 25th 1915. After that battle, in November 1915, the Battalion went into Divisional reserve at Fleurbaix with billets at Rue Quesnoy and Rue de Bruges. The 2nd Battalion’s war diary recorded that from November 4th 1915, each day about ten soldiers were granted six days’ leave of absence to the U.K..
Thomas Howard was posted as a deserter on 7th November 1915 suggesting, perhaps, he had not returned from leave on time. It would be difficult to desert in France as it would not be possible to cross the Channel without a pass. By definition, a deserter had to have thrown away his weapon and uniform (or most of it) and demonstrated no intention of returning to his unit. He eventually re-enlisted into the 7th (Queen’s Own) Hussars which did not serve in France, so it seems probable he failed to return to the Middlesex Regiment at Fleurbaix by overstaying home leave in November 1915. It is probably a co-incidence he served exactly one year to the day as a foot soldier in France.
If he deserted in England he would have been absent from his unit and probably out of uniform which would have given him the opportunity to re-enlist into a regiment that was not going to require him return to the trenches. At the time, the 7th (Queen’s Own) Hussars was in India, which was not a theatre of war, and perhaps would have seemed attractive, as he would not have to go to France. Compulsory conscription was introduced in March 1916, so the window of opportunity to re-enlist voluntarily was a brief period between November 1915 and February 1916. Thomas Howard did re-enlist and served with the 7th Hussars as a private, eventually being promoted to corporal, with the regimental number 27248.
The 7th Hussars remained in India until December 1917 when they were sent to Mesopotamia to serve on horse-back with the 11th Indian Cavalry Brigade. They fought at the Action of Khan Baghdadi (26–27 March 1918), the Action at Fat-ha Gorge on the Little Zab (23–26 October 1918) and the Battle of Sharqat (28–30 October 1918). The Ottoman Empire signed an armistice on 30th October 1918.
Corporal Howard returned to the U.K. early in 1919 and was discharged to the Reserve on 20th May 1919.
At some stage it was revealed that Thomas Howard had deserted the Middlesex Regiment and his re-enlistment in the Hussars was therefore fraudulent. Fraudulent enlistment was a court-martial offence and was punishable by imprisonment with financial charges being made for loss of any uniform or equipment. However, if the soldier was already abroad on active service it was possible for him to be simply discharged from his previous regiment to continue serving in his present regiment. Often, there was no point in having a man languishing in jail when he would be better employed in fighting. It is also possible that the re-enlistment into the Hussars was not revealed until after the war when medal qualifications were being compiled by the regional army record offices.
In March 1918, Thomas Howard was initially disqualified from being awarded the 1914 Star (having deserted) but in 1921 that decision was reversed and his name appeared on a restitution roll of the Middlesex Regiment permitting the award of the 1914 Star in 1921 (E/1/128 page 100 which referred to the original 1918 entry on roll number E/1/2 page 30 dated 6th March 1918). He also qualified for the British War Medal and the Victory Medal.
He served four-and-half years at war, became a corporal, and was forgiven.
With kind regards,
Alan
Reply from: Lesley
Date: Sunday 3rd January 2016 at 1:44 PM

Alan,

This is fantastic :) - thank you so much, for so much information and so quick, it is greatly appreciated and my father will be most pleased.

I would like to wish you a Happy New Year.

Kindest regards

Lesley
Posted by: Bella {No contact email}
Location: Esher
Date: Monday 28th December 2015 at 6:40 PM
Dear Alan,

Just wondering if you have been affected by the terrible floods all over the north of England. I do hope not.

I trust, (if the above has affected you) you were able to have a reasonable Christmas and wish you a good New Year.

With kind regards.

Bella
Reply from: Alan Greveson
Date: Tuesday 29th December 2015 at 12:10 AM

Dear Bella,
Thank you for your concern.I have just got communications restored at midnight. I am dry at the moment and miraculously (through high powered water-pumps at the sub-station) have electric power but living in a street full of rescue boats and rescue teams from Derbyshire who are helping out voluntarily as some of my neighbours are less fortunate. I have spent a day or more without telephone or internet - pre-technology - so it has been good to focus on reality and visit my neighbours and talk to them and help them in person. Shops etc. have put up signs reading "cash only" because the cash machines and tills don't work, which shows how much we have decided to rely on technology. My local Waitrose has been closed for two days with water lapping at the doors and there is now a severe lack of items in the fridge sealed with a cork.
Tomorrow is another day,
Alan
Reply from: Alan Greveson
Date: Tuesday 29th December 2015 at 12:44 AM

I ought to add that despite the severe difficulties caused by flooding over the Christmas holiday (and the inevitable aftermath and clean-up) there has been a wonderous pulling-together of resources and a marvelous community spirit determined to help where they can.
Reply from: Bella
Date: Tuesday 29th December 2015 at 5:11 PM

Dear Alan

Thank goodness you all alive and well. Cannot imagine the devastation - must be a hundred times worse than the media portray.

Trust it won't be too long before you all on "dry land", Hope 2016 will prove better.

With kind regards to you and yours,

Bella
Posted by: Maurice Simms {Email left}
Location: Whitby Ontario Canada
Date: Thursday 24th December 2015 at 10:41 PM
Hello, Alan.

Your name was mentioned to me by Gerry Ryder at Rainhill Civic Society when we were sharing some information.

I would appreciate any help you can give me about my grandfather's military service. I have some information but it seems his service records could be among those that, I understand, were probably lost in the Blitz. I think I might have all the information I can hope to get, though some interpretation of the medal information would be interesting.

The information I have is:
1. Layton Welsby, 13 Ellaby Road, Rainhill, Lancashire, 1885 to 1936 (I have family information, including census reports).
2. Number 442037, 6th (Service) Battalion South Lancashire Regiment.
3. Medal roll: British J/1/103A, page 107. K1880. (1475) Wt. W2793/RP8142 1,000m 12/21 J.F.W E8286.

The regimental history states:
6th (Service) Battalion
Formed at Warrington in August 1914 as part of K1 and moved to Tidworth, attached to 38th Brigade in 13th (Western) Division. Moved to billets in Winchester in January 1915 before going next month to Blackdown. Sailed from Avonmouth in June 1915. Landed at Cape Helles (Gallipoli) 7-31 July then moved to Mudros. Landed at Anzac Beach 4 August 1915. 20 December 1915: evacuated from Gallipoli and went to Egypt via Mudros. February 1916: moved to Mesopotamia.

Family history says he was also in India.

From the website (www.qlrmuseum.co.uk) of:

The regimental museum of
The Queen's Lancashire Regiment
The South Lancashire Regiment
(Prince of Wales's Volunteers)

The South Lancashire Regiment was formed in 1881 as a result of the Cardwell reforms of the British Army. With its Regimental Depot at Peninsula Barracks, Warrington, the Regiment initially consisted of two battalions, with the 1st formed from the former 40th Regiment of Foot, and the 2nd from the former 82nd.

The Regiment recruited primarily from that area of South Lancashire which is centred on the townships of Warrington and St Helens. During World War I the Regiment expanded to a total strength of 21 battalions.

They served on the Western Front, at Gallipoli, and in Macedonia, Egypt, Mesopotamia (modern-day Iraq) and India. In all, they were awarded a total of 64 Battle Honours. The Regiment suffered a total of 5,450 casualties. Four members of the Regiment were awarded the Victoria Cross.

The Regiment was again expanded in World War II, to a total of 9 battalions. They served in North West Europe, Madagascar, India and Burma. On D-Day, 6 June 1944, the 1st Battalion was in the first wave to land on Sword Beach, Normandy, at the start of the invasion of Europe.

On 1st July 1958 the Regiment amalgamated with the East Lancashire Regiment to form The Lancashire Regiment (Prince of Wales's Volunteers), which in 1970, in turn amalgamated with The Loyal North Lancashire Regiment to form The Queen's Lancashire Regiment.

Maurice.

Maurice Simms
(mandasimms at bell dot net)
905-728-0868
Reply from: Alan Greveson
Date: Thursday 24th December 2015 at 11:13 PM

Dear Maurice,
No individual service record has survived for Layton Welsby 42037 (correct) so it is not possible to state his military service. He qualified only for the British War Medal which indicated he had served overseas sometime after January 1st 1916. Soldiers who served only in garrisons in India qualified only for the British War Medal. Had he served abroad in a theatre of war with the 6th South Lancashire Regiment before the Turkish Armistice of October 1918 he would have qualified also for the Victory Medal. Troops serving in Mesopotamia sailed from and to India. Mesopotamia was a theatre of war, whereas India was not. The conclusion is Layton Welsby served in India but did not see combat.
The reference K1880 (1475) Wt. W2793/RP8142 1,000m 12/21 J.F.W E8286 is a printer’s reference which refers to the printing of the stationery card on which his name was written.
With kind regards,
Alan
Reply from: Maurice Simms
Date: Friday 25th December 2015 at 8:20 PM

Hello, Alan.

Many thanks for your e-mail and insight into my grandfather's military service. It's good to know exactly where he served and what medal was awarded and to know I've got all the information I can possibly get, given that his service record has not survived. Much appreciated.

Maurice.

P.S. Do you know of anyone who can help with WW2 records? I had two uncles in the army, including one who was a Japanese POW, and another uncle in the navy. It seems these sources are all over the place and I've not been able to get anything at all.
Reply from: Alan Greveson
Date: Friday 25th December 2015 at 8:42 PM

Dear Maurice,
Service records for deceased British personnel who served in the Second World War are not in the public domain and are protected under UK data protection laws. If you are not the direct next-of-kin you can apply for limited information from the Ministry of Defence, providing you pay the current fee and can provide evidence of death. Navy and Army records are held by different departments. See:
https://www.gov.uk/get-copy-military-service-records/overview
With kind regards,
Alan
Posted by: Gina In Canada {Email left}
Location: Aurora Ontario Canada
Date: Wednesday 23rd December 2015 at 4:36 PM
Dear Alan,
You have now helped me a couple of times which has been really appreciated.
My latest military problem is a John Cameron, born 1870 in Druimarbin (many spellings), Fort William, Scotland.
I know that his trade was a blacksmith. The only detail I have of his military service is a photograph. He has spurs on his low-cut, laced and buckled boots, his britches meet his socks at the knees, he holds a whip in his left hand, there is a light coloured braided cord around his left arm at the shoulder seam - it passes through and epaulette on his shoulder and is tucked into his left breast pocket, there is an ammumnition belt diagonally across his chest. There are no signs of rank on his left sleeve (right sleeve not visible) and he wears a peaked cap.There is a badge on the cap but it is not easily distinguishable.
He would have been 44 in 1914 but in this photo he looks to be 30ish so I am thinking Boer War?
Can you help at all? Could I send you the photo?
I appreciate your time Alan and will understand if this is out of your area...........Thanks, Gina
PS Merry Christmas!
Reply from: Alan Greveson
Date: Wednesday 23rd December 2015 at 6:09 PM

Dear Gina,
From the description it is possible John Cameron served in one of the branches of the Royal Artillery. The Artillery wore a white lanyard and horse drivers were mounted with spurs and whip. The socks were actually puttees wound around the leg. For a comparison photograph of an artilleryman see:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Service_Dress_%28British_Army%29#/media/File:Gunner_J_Orr_%286260268805%29.jpg
The khaki British Army Service Dress uniform was introduced in battles from 1884 (Khartoum Expedition) to 1898 (Omdurman) and was then worn from 1898 to 1939.
Other than that, it is not possible to identify individual records from just the name, John Cameron, born in Scotland. Many Second Anglo-Boer War (1899 – 1902) soldiers were volunteers and the readily available surviving records of medals and casualties are not necessarily complete and do not provide any biographical information, identifying a man only by name, number and regiment.
With kind regards, and wishes for a Merry Christmas,
Alan
Reply from: Gina In Canada
Date: Wednesday 23rd December 2015 at 7:45 PM

That was really helpful Alan. The photo on Wiki is very similar to my photo of John Cameron. Also, there was a photo on Wiki of an Argyll & Sutherland Highlander which is very similar to an unnamed photo of a presumed brother to John Cameron. So I am getting closer!!.................many thanks for your time, Gina.
PS I will be delighted to make a donation to the Legion.
Posted by: Nick {Email left}
Location: Shaftesbury
Date: Wednesday 23rd December 2015 at 9:43 AM
Alan,
Another query please. I'm trying to find out some detail regarding the WW1 service of my wife’s grandfather. His name was Richard Jewers and he served in the Royal Field Artillery. He hailed from the Gosforth area as far as we can tell.
His Medal Index card records him as:
- 2102.
His MIC also has the number:
- 750872.
His card shows he was eligible for the Victory Medal and British War Medal (reference RFA/128B (TF) 5587). Although there is no detail on the MIC for the ‘Theatre first served in’ we believe he served in France; my wife remembers him as having one leg, with other family information suggesting he lost the other one during service in France. An aunt recalls being given permission to visit him in hospital there with the warning that if he died while she was en route she would have to turn back. We have no other family members who can add to his history.

I wondered if you or anyone else could please assist with information about which regiment and/or battery he served in? Once I have details of that I hope then to research where he served and was wounded.

Many thanks
Nick
Reply from: Alan Greveson
Date: Wednesday 23rd December 2015 at 5:06 PM

Dear Nick,
There are no surviving records that state in which unit of the Royal Field Artillery gunner Richard Jewers served.
The only record appears to be a medal rolls index-card which indicated he qualified for the British War Medal and the Victory Medal. As he did not qualify for a star medal for service in 1914 or 1915, no date of entry to a theatre of war was recorded on the card. As he did not qualify for the 1914-15 Star for service overseas before December 31st 1915, he did not go abroad until some date after January 1st 1916. The fact he had two regimental numbers, the earliest with four digits, indicates he served in a Territorial brigade of the Royal Field Artillery. The second number, 750872, was allotted early in 1917 within the batch 750001-755000. This batch was used by the 1st/1st Northumbrian Brigade Royal Field Artillery (also known as 250 Brigade or CCL Brigade in Roman numerals) and the 2nd/1st Northumbrian Brigade R.F.A. (315 Brigade or CCCXV Brigade).
By his regimental number, Richard Jewers served in either 250 Brigade or 315 Brigade R.F.A.. However, most Royal Artillery brigades were re-organised at various times throughout the war and tracking an individual man’s history requires his individual service record, which in this case has not survived.
250 Brigade served with 50th Division and went to France in April 1915 until the end of the war with the exception of 1st August to 20th October 1918 when 250 Brigade came under the control of other divisions as required. 315 Brigade joined 63rd Royal Naval Divisional Artillery in France in July 1916. In February 1917 it became an Army Field Brigade R.F.A.
As gunner Jewers was wounded it is possible he received a pension. One source of pension records not available elsewhere is from some six million records conserved by the Western Front Association. They charge GBP 25.00 for a manual search. See:
http://www.westernfrontassociation.com/all-about-the-wfa/wfa-news-events/pension-records.html
With kind regards,
Alan
Reply from: Nick
Date: Wednesday 23rd December 2015 at 6:58 PM

Alan,

Thank you so much for this information. You have provided us with an excellent start point and I shall now start researching Gnr Jewers and 1st/1st and 2nd/1st Bdes RFA.

Have a very Happy Christmas and cracking New Year.

Regards

Nick
Posted by: Brian Renshall {Email left}
Location: Rainhill
Date: Monday 21st December 2015 at 7:53 PM
Alan, could you possibly provide me with any information on Pte 17883 Nathan Lyon,Liverpool Regiment particularly if he was a "Rainhill" man Thank You
Reply from: Alan Greveson
Date: Monday 21st December 2015 at 10:03 PM

Dear Brian,
No military records that provide biographical information for Nathan Lyon have survived. Going by military enlistment age-groups, Nathan was probably Nathan Lyon born on 3rd October 1893 the son of Nathan and Anne Lyon of Foot of Bridge, Rainhill. He was baptised on 7th January 1894 at St Ann’s Church, Rainhill. In the 1911 census the family lived at Ashdown Terrace, Warrington Road, Rainhill, where Nathan was a 17 year old clerk at a Blue Works. This was probably on Chapel Lane where there was a Smalt or Blue works owned by the Rawlinson family.
Army rolls show Nathan Lyon, 17883, enlisted in the 3rd Liverpool Pals (19th Battalion King’s Liverpool Regiment) on 14th September 1914 and went with them to France on 7th November 1915. He was wounded and returned to England where he was discharged to the Class P Reserve on 16th August 1917. Chris Baker's website: ‘The Long, Long Trail’ says: “The Class P reserve consisted of men ‘whose services are deemed to be temporarily of more value to the country in civil life rather than in the Army’ and who were not lower than medical grade C iii, and as a result of having served in the Army would, if discharged, be eligible for a pension on the grounds of disability or length of service. They wore no uniform and were not under military discipline. The P Reserve men were discharged in December 1918” (© Milverton Associates Limited).
Nathan Lyon of Rainhill married Nellie Thompson in 1920. The banns for their marriage were read on three Sundays in September 1920 at St Ann’s Church, Rainhill. Both parties were “of this parish”. Nathan lived at Ashdown Terrace, Rainhill, and Nellie at “The Hollies” Rainhill when they were married on October 6th 1920, by the Rev. Swainson. Nathan’s occupation was shown as “clerk”.
When Nathan’s father was buried in St Ann’s churchyard on 19th June 1940, the father’s address was given as 5 Ashdown Terrace, Warrington Road, Rainhill.
Nathan Lyon born 1893 died in 1971 in the Prescot District.
With kind regards,
Alan
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