Alan Greveson's World War 1 Forum (Page 24)

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Posted by: Julie {Email left}
Location: Horsham
Date: Thursday 7th August 2014 at 5:16 PM
Hi Alan,

Are you able to help with Naval records . I'm looking for any information on C W Fiveash b. 1894 (Charles William), he was awarded the Silver War Badge, SS 111148,

Many thanks and kind regards,

Julie
Reply from: Alan Greveson
Date: Thursday 7th August 2014 at 5:29 PM

Dear Julie,
You would need to purchase his service record from The National Archives. It can be downloaded for £3.30 from:
http://discovery.nationalarchives.gov.uk/SearchUI/Details?uri=D7076814

With kind regards,
Alan
Reply from: Julie
Date: Thursday 7th August 2014 at 5:36 PM

Many thanks for your help,

Regards

Julie
Posted by: Paul Crook
Location: Headley Down
Date: Wednesday 6th August 2014 at 12:07 PM
Hi Alan

I have asked you about this man before but just wondering if anything else might have come to light in the last 2 years or so.

I am trying to find out about Sidney Crook of the Norfolk Regiment, particularly his home address, to try to prove he is a relative of my grandfather's. I believe his army number is 12125. 'My Sidney' would have come fro the Rushford/Thetford area of |Norfolk.

Any help, as always, would be much appreciated.

Paul
Reply from: Alan Greveson
Date: Wednesday 6th August 2014 at 1:20 PM

Dear Paul,
There appears to be no documentation that would provide an address for Sidney Crook. It is possible he might have applied for a pension. The Western Front Association holds an archive of 6.5 million pension record cards (PRCs) which are not available elsewhere. They charge an administrative fee for a manual search of the records. See:
http://www.westernfrontassociation.com/about-the-wfa/175-pension-records/2961-pension-record-cards-manual-lookup-request.html

With kind regards,
Alan
Posted by: Mark {Email left}
Location: Birmingham
Date: Tuesday 5th August 2014 at 11:14 PM
Trying to find out information as to where my great grandfather Joseph Elijah Warom may have been during ww1

i know he enlisted on 14th August 1914 with the RFA No 88738
he went to No 3 depot, which i believe is in Hilsea
he then transferred to "15 res bty" then "30 Bde RFA" this maybe one entry but is on two lines in his medical records.

He was discharged on re-enlistment with the Royal Engineers on 28th May 1919 (what would he have done with them)

medical report

25.2.15 Haemorrhoids
26.2.15 To England
3.7.17 P.U.O
9.7.17 to England
30.4.20 to England

Article 9
178. 9.7.17 Trench fever

I would be interested in finding out which battles he would have been involved in and what is article 9 and any other information would be gratefully received
Reply from: Alan Greveson
Date: Wednesday 6th August 2014 at 1:19 PM

Dear Mark,
It is not possible to state where Joseph Warom served. He enlisted into the Royal Field Artillery in August 1914 and trained at No 3 Depot (Hilsea) and then with 15 Reserve Battery which was part of 3A Reserve Brigade at Larkhill on Salisbury Plain. He was then posted to 30 Brigade RFA which had been in France since August 1914 with the 3rd Division. 30 Brigade was broken-up on 14 May 1916. An Army medal rolls index card showed Joseph first arrived in France on 24th October 1914 and recorded his unit as "base details" RFA, which suggests he was first at a base camp in France. There is no evidence he actually arrived at 30 Brigade, as he could have been posted to any brigade once he arrived at a base camp in France.
The artillery was reorganised frequently as the war progressed and a gunner might serve in various batteries or brigades during the course of the war. Without a list of those brigades and dates of a man's postings it is not possible to state where a man fought.
Joseph returned to England on 26th February 1915. He would have gone abroad again at some stage as he was once more returned to England on 9 July 1917 suffering P U O which was Pyrexia of Unknown Origin, which later was classified as Trench Fever. "Article 9" refers to this re-classification of P U O as Trench Fever after much debate about its origins. The War Office sanctioned the name of the disease at the end of 1917 as described in "Instructions for Medical Officers".
With kind regards,
Alan
Posted by: David
Location: Austraila
Date: Tuesday 5th August 2014 at 7:15 AM
Dear Allen, Looking for medal entitilments for uncle who was in india 1919-1921 could you please advise.Regards David.
Reply from: Alan Greveson
Date: Tuesday 5th August 2014 at 10:26 AM

Dear David,
The India General service Medal (1908-1935) was awarded to qualifying personnel who took part in operations against uprisings in Afghanistan North West Frontier (1919), Waziristan (1919-21), Mashud (1919-20) or Malabar (1921-22). Those who were awarded medals were listed on the relevant regimental medal roll with titles such as "for those entitled to the "India General Service Medal (1908) with clasp inscribed "Afghanistan NWF 1919", "Waziristan 1919-21" and/or "Mashud 1919-1920"." You would need to know his name, regiment and service number to identify the one-line entry on the rolls. The rolls are available at The National Archives and on the ancestry.co.uk or ancestry.com.au website (subscription required). Some libraries offer free access to the ancestry website.
With kind regards,
Alan
Posted by: Beth {Email left}
Location: Belfast
Date: Monday 4th August 2014 at 8:21 PM
Hi, was hoping someone might be able to help with some info on a great uncle killed in action, apparently by a land mine. Unfortunately I have little in the way of details, his name was William James Millar, sometimes known as Willie,, born 1895 Belfast, son of Hugh & Matilda Millar. I have one picture of him in uniform & a postcard he sent home dated 2nd Dec 1914 with a pic of Birkenhead park entrance on the front, simply saying he had arrived and would write again when settled. His pic in uniform is in postcard form, as was normal, with Mrs G Swain, St Giles Studio, Norwich stamped on back. I have found a William Millar as part of the Cheshire Regiment, killed 20/8/15 aged 21 which would fit but can't seem to find anything to that confirms they are the same person.

Any help will be most gratefully received.
Reply from: Beth
Date: Thursday 7th August 2014 at 8:05 PM

Hi Alan
Just wondered if you'd managed to find anything re the above?

Many thanks
Reply from: Alan Greveson
Date: Thursday 7th August 2014 at 9:09 PM

Dear Beth,
Unfortunately, there are no surviving records that would distinguish between at least three William James Millars, born in Belfast, who served and died in the First World War. The Cheshire Regiment entry is worth pursuing because the 15th Battalion Cheshire Regiment (1st Birkenhead) was raised at Birkenhead on 18th November 1914 by the local MP Alfred Bigland as a Bantam battalion for men of shorter stature (4ft 10ins to 5ft 2ins) when the Army had set a minimum height of 5ft 3ins. The 15th Battalion Cheshire Regiment was the first such battalion to be raised and became quite famous as a result. Apparently, men travelled widely to join the battalion at Birkenhead. There was a ferry across the channel from Belfast to Liverpool/Birkenhead.
The war diary of the 15th Battalion Cheshire Regiment can be downloaded (cost £3.30) from:
http://discovery.nationalarchives.gov.uk/SearchUI/Details?uri=C7353970

With kind regards,
Alan
Reply from: Beth
Date: Friday 8th August 2014 at 4:15 PM

Thanks so much for this Alan

This sounds even more plausible now that you've mentioned the height aspect, which hadn't been aware of before.
I don't know Willie's height, however all the Millar men are on the shorter side with my grandfather (his brother) being 5ft 3,my dad (his nephew) 5ft2 & my brother (his g.nephew) 5ft2.

Thank you so much - donation on it's way to RBL
Reply from: Alan Greveson
Date: Friday 8th August 2014 at 7:21 PM

Dear Beth,
Thank you for making a donation to the Royal British Legion. It makes it all worthwhile.
With kind regards,
Alan
Posted by: Brian Renshall {Email left}
Location: Rainhill
Date: Monday 4th August 2014 at 7:36 PM
Alan, I realise that this is the longest of long shots given his surname,but can you provide 'any' information of Edward Arthur Jones. All I know is that he served in Egypt and in 1919 wrote to his Mother from Jerusalem. Any help appreciated.
Reply from: Alan Greveson
Date: Monday 4th August 2014 at 7:56 PM

Dear Brian,
It is not possible to identify a soldier by his name only.
With kind regards,
Alan
Posted by: Brian Renshall {Email left}
Location: Rainhill
Date: Monday 4th August 2014 at 7:31 PM
Alan, I realise that given his surname this is a long shot,but I am looking for any info on surviving soldier Edward Arthur Jones.All I know is that he served in Egypt and in 1919 wrote to his Mother from Jerusalem. Any info at all appreciated.
Posted by: Caron012 {Email left}
Location: Sussex
Date: Monday 4th August 2014 at 2:30 PM
Hi, I was wondering if anyone out there can help me find out more on my Great Great Uncle, George Campbell Cavalier (in some records as Cavilier) who joined 2/10 Londons, 175th Brigade, 58th (2/1st London Division) in 1917. He fought in the Battle of Polygon Wood on 26th September 1917, although all the Google searches I have done state mainly Australian facts - not a lot on British fighters, It seemed he was posted to 13th Batallion Rifle Brigade on 4th October 1917 - the day he died. He died aged 19 and I've been told he died way behind enemy lines, possibly in an accident as there is no cause of death in his record. Suffice to say it is perplexing me! Any help gratefully appreciated.
Posted by: Helen {Email left}
Location: Manchester
Date: Friday 1st August 2014 at 1:05 PM
I am trying to research a past pupil of Cavendish Primary manchester who died in world war 1. He was called Alexander stewart. His parents were John and Jane Stewart and they lived in West Didsbury area in Manchester. Am researchimg for school project to mark centenary.
Many thanks
Reply from: Alan Greveson
Date: Friday 1st August 2014 at 2:58 PM

Dear Helen,
From the information you have it is not possible to positively identify a person's military record: there are simply too many men named Alexander Stewart.
It is possible the Alexander Stewart you refer to was born on 24th March 1897, and baptised at Holy Trinity Church, Hulme, on 30th May 1897, the son of John and Jane Elizabeth Stewart of 1, Abbey Grove. This couple lived at 5, Matlock Road, High Didsbury, in 1911, with Alexander being recorded as a 14-year-old scholar.
Alexander, described as a clerk, enlisted in the Royal Navy at Devonport on 7th April 1914 as an ordinary seaman with the number SS/4808. He appears to have miss-stated his age to make himself appear older than he was as he claimed his date of birth was 24 November 1895. However, when he was lost at sea in 1914, his parents stated his age was 17, which was in fact, correct. Alexander Stewart served on "HMS Monmouth" from 31st July 1914. HMS "Monmouth" was lost in the Battle of Coronel on November 1st 1914. Alexander is commemorated on the Plymouth Naval Memorial. See:
http://www.cwgc.org/find-war-dead/casualty/3045449/STEWART,%20ALEXANDER

The Commonwealth War Graves Commission record, which was created in the early 1920s with information provided by the next-of-kin, stated Alexander was aged 17 and was the son of John and Jane Elizabeth Stewart who then lived at 96, Lansdowne Road, Didsbury, Manchester.
While all reasonable efforts to ensure that information provided through this website is accurate, because of the lack of detail provided on which to base a search you should exercise your own caution, skill and judgement before you rely on the information provided.
With kind regards,
Alan
Reply from: Helen
Date: Friday 1st August 2014 at 8:39 PM

Thanks very much for your prompt response. What you tell me fits in with information I have from school admissions book and confirms that is the Alexander Stewart I have been trying to find. This will greatly help with our commemoration project at school.
Helen
Posted by: Rab Lavery {Email left}
Location: Belfast
Date: Friday 1st August 2014 at 9:24 AM
Dear Alan
I'm trying to do some research on Rifleman Matthew Smyth 9/15906 Royal Irish Rifles . I'm led to believe he was from the Shankill Road Area of Belfast.
I would be grateful for any information at all Alan.
What I have so far is as follows KIA 03/01/1916 Aged 34 Grave II. F. 4. Cemetery SUCRERIE MILITARY CEMETERY, COLINCAMPS.
Many Thanks in Advance Alan
Rab Lavery
Belfast
Reply from: Alan Greveson
Date: Friday 1st August 2014 at 2:43 PM

Dear Rab,
No individual service record has survived for Matthew Smyth so it is not possible to suggest his military service. His regimental number indicated he served in the 9th Battalion Royal Irish Rifles (West Belfast) which was raised in September 1914 from the Belfast Volunteers. Rifleman Smyth entered France on 4th October 1915 which was the same date the Battalion went to France, so it is probable he served with the Battalion from its inception. The Battalion trained at Ballykinlar until July 1915 when it moved to Seaford, Sussex. The Battalion served in the 107th Infantry Brigade in the 36th (Ulster) Division. See:
http://www.1914-1918.net/36div.htm

The war diary of the 9th Battalion for the period 1915-1917 is available to download (Cost £3.30) from:
http://discovery.nationalarchives.gov.uk/SearchUI/Details?uri=C7354024

Matthew Smyth qualified for the 1914-15 Star, the British War Medal and the Victory Medal.
With kind regards,
Alan
Reply from: Rab Lavery
Date: Friday 1st August 2014 at 3:20 PM

Dear Alan
Many thanks for the quick reply , I really appreciate the work you do Sir , Thanks Again , Rab

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