Circle City Communities

Alan Greveson's World War 1 Forum (Page 24)

To contact someone on the forum, please leave a Reply to their message, and ask them to use the Contact Editor link at the bottom of this page, giving me permission to release their email to you, and also contacting me yourself. Please don't ask for their email (Privacy Law).

The forum has 242 pages containing 2418 messages
-10   Prev Page   20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28   Next Page   10+

Posted by: Graham Dickenson {Email left}
Location: Newark
Date: Wednesday 12th February 2014 at 5:46 PM
Dear Alan, I am researching a member of the Household Battalion. I have a copy of the war diaries and of a very good book by G.W.Harvey so the battalions movements are clear. What I cannot find is the location of the College Communale, Arras, France, used as accomodation for troops. In Mr Harveys book an address of Rue d Arsonat is given. I have googled the college and the address but have found nothing. Can you help?
Regards, Graham.
Reply from: Alan Greveson
Date: Wednesday 12th February 2014 at 7:45 PM

Dear Graham,
I don't know the address of the college. There was a Collège Communal de Garçons d'Arras. There is an old postcard at:
http://www.delcampe.net/page/item/id,0105480095,language,E.html

The address Rue d Arsonat might have been Rue de l'Arsenal, Arras, which did exist pre-war and was shelled on July 27th 1915. See
http://www.delcampe.net/page/item/id,56396761,var,Arras-rue-de-lArsenal,language,E.html

An e-mail to the Carrière Wellington at Arras might provide the answer. See
http://www.explorearras.com/fr/visiter/memoire.html

With kind regards,
Alan
Reply from: Graham Dickenson
Date: Thursday 13th February 2014 at 2:37 PM

Dear Alan,
Many thanks for the information.
Best regards, Graham.
Posted by: Pete {Email left}
Location: E Yorks
Date: Wednesday 12th February 2014 at 4:10 PM
Hello Alan,

You never fail to amaze me with the information you always supply me with. These are truly fascinating details of his life. I had traced a marriage in Russia, but doubted whether it could be him. Now you have confirmed his marriage for me. Thank you so much .

I shall be sending a cheque off to your chosen charity to show my thanks

Kind regards

Pete
Reply from: Alan Greveson
Date: Wednesday 12th February 2014 at 9:36 PM

Thank you, Pete.
Kind regards,
Alan
Posted by: Pete {Email left}
Location: E Yorks
Date: Tuesday 11th February 2014 at 9:07 PM
Hello again Alan
In 2011 you were good enough to help me with another member of this family.
I am now trying to discover more about this soldier.
British Army WW1 Service record 1914 - 1920 Harold Walter Smellie Military RGA (Gunner) 1918
H/A 21 Marlboro Avenue, Hull
I Think from his Record of Service Papers, he went to South Camp, Ripon some time around 6 January. 1918
He was the son of Thomas Gehomann and Hannah Smellie.

I would appreciate anything that you may find about him
Kind regards

Pete
Reply from: Alan Greveson
Date: Wednesday 12th February 2014 at 3:32 PM

Dear Peter,
Harold Walter Smellie was named Walter Harold Smellie at the registration of his birth and his marriage. He appears to have used the name "Harold" while in the British Army. During the First World War he was living in Russia with his wife Mary Fichte whom he had married at St Petersburg on 7th October 1912. St Petersburg was re-named Petrograd in 1914. Harold stated he offered his services to the British Army in May 1917 which would have been following the Revolution of March 1917 when the Tsar was deposed and a provisional government was formed. In November 1917 (October in the Russian Julian calendar) the Bolsheviks under Lenin took power and declared itself neutral in the war with Germany. Civil war loomed large between those faithful to the Tsar (White Russians) and those loyal to the worker's revolution (The Red Russians or Bolsheviks). Britain aligned with the Whites.
Harold and Mary left Russia in November 1917 and Harold reported to the Army at Hull in November 1917. Because compulsory conscription had been introduced in 1916, all men of military age were deemed to be enlisted and, if not already serving, were awaiting call-up. Harold, who was 31, would have been enlisted on 24th June 1916 had he been available for call-up. In November 1917 a National Service Medical Board found he needed medical treatment and he spent some time in hospital before being passed fit. On New Year's Day 1918, Harold enlisted as a gunner at No 4 Depot Royal Garrison Artillery (RGA) at South Camp, Ripon. By February 16th 1918 he was training with 2nd Siege Artillery Reserve Brigade at Catterick.
In March 1918 Lenin signed the Treaty of Brest-Litovsk, formally ending Russia's participation in the war against Germany. This allowed thirty German divisions to be sent to the western Front in France and Flanders where the Germans launched the Spring Offensive of March 21st 1918. Vast stockpiles of Allied war materiel at Murmansk and Archangel (now Arkhangel'sk) in North Russia were being taken by the Bolsheviks to Moscow. The French and British were desperate to keep Germany fighting in the East and an Allied force was created to empower the White Russians to overthrow the Bolsheviks, assisted by the Czechoslovak Legion, which was stranded along the Trans-Siberian Railway, thus establishing a Russian government that would again wage war against Germany.
In July 1918, The British North Russian Expeditionary Force (NREF) with French, Italians, Serbians, Poles and Americans occupied Murmansk and, in August, Archangel. The British also sent two training missions to Murmansk (Syren Force) and Archangel (Elope Force). Their job was to train a White Russian force in their own country as the first step in the formation of a new Eastern front against Germany. These missions were raised in secrecy and included experienced Commonwealth soldiers who had fought in France, while the fighting force was formed mainly of men of lower medical categories, to avoid removing men from France.
On 27th May 1918 Harold moved to The Tower of London barracks of the RGA and was posted to the Headquarters of Elope Force. On 16th June he sailed on "City of Marseilles" from Newcastle-upon- Tyne to Murmansk, Russia, disembarking on the 23rd June 1918. He was appointed an acting sergeant with pay at Murmansk on 15th July 1918. He was performing the duties of an interpreter. He then sailed to Archangel on 3rd August 1918. He worked as an acting-serjeant as an interpreter until 1st May 1919 at Archangel with the Elope training mission. He was then posted to a Royal Artillery School at Bakaritza on the River Dvina opposite Archangel. Harold there became an orderly room serjeant and reverted to his permanent pay grade "on ceasing to perform duties of interpreter". Alongside the actual war against the Bolsheviks, the mission to train a White Russian army was fraught with difficulties as the Russians occasionally mutinied or changed sides. Allied soldiers had to put down mutinies in the army they were supposed to be training. The commander in North Russia, Major General Edmund Ironside, wrote that the mutinies had caused him a greater shock than he liked to admit. "I now felt a distinct urge to extricate myself and my troops as quickly as I could". The small Allied force (which had to publish orders in six different languages) was ineffectual because revolution and civil war were too complex to be resolved by a small force of Allied soldiers speaking only through interpreters or fighting in the frozen wastes.
On 26th July 1919, the British government sent Lord Rawlinson to Archangel to oversee the conduct of the evacuation, with the North Russian Relief Force. Winston Churchill said afterwards that the withdrawal let down the White Russians who now had to face the Bolsheviks alone.
On 20th September 1919 Harold sailed from Archangel for the UK and was discharged on 9th December 1919 in the UK.
He qualified for the British War Medal, The Allied Victory Medal and was awarded the ribbon of the Silver Medal of St Stanislaus which was issued by the White Russian leaders to ranks who served in an exemplary manner on their behalf. The award was not published openly in the UK so as not to offend the Bolshevik Russian government. The Australian soldiers served in British battalions and the Official History of Australia in the War of 1914-1918 makes no mention of the North Russia Expeditionary Force. The Allied Victory Medal is inscribed with the dates 1914 -1919 reflecting the war in Russia did not end until 1919. After the war, Harold and his family moved to Paris and in 1941 he and his wife sailed from Lisbon, Portugal, to America.
See also:
http://www.nationalarchives.gov.uk/pathways/firstworldwar/spotlights/allies.htm

With kind regards,
Alan
Posted by: Lollypop {Email left}
Location: Doncaster
Date: Saturday 8th February 2014 at 2:10 PM
Looking for information regarding how and where Arthur Bull, 1st Battalion Northumberland Fusiliers, Private 16644, was killed on 8th December 1915. Buried in Dickebusch New Military Cememtery. Arthur has been remembered on the Betley, Chesire War Memorial. He has been a member of our family, the Bulls. Unknown parents but is formally recognized on the 1901. 1911 census, as living with his Grandparents. Arthur was born at Betley in 1886. Last year when we visited Ypres, we did not know of Arthur, yet we were so close to where he is remembered. Can you help please, anything is a bonus.
Reply from: Alan Greveson
Date: Saturday 8th February 2014 at 7:01 PM

Dear Lollypop,
It is not possible to say how an individual was killed unless there is a first-hand account of the incident. And the evidence for Arthur Bull is both vague and contradictory. The war diary of the 1st Battalion Northumberland Fusiliers for 8th December 1915 stated: "casualties nil" yet the casualty returns, prepared by the same officer who kept the diary, showed otherwise.
A medal index card for Arthur Bull showed he first went to France and Flanders on 22nd June 1915 and noted he was "KIA" (killed in action). He would have been part of a draft of reinforcements for the 1st Battalion Northumberland Fusiliers who had been in France and Flanders since August 1914, and had just been involved in the attack on Bellewaarde Ridge on 16th June 1915. They served in the 9th Infantry Brigade which was in static trench routine to the South of Ypres when Arthur arrived. Trench routine involved a few days in the trenches followed by a few days further to the rear in billets, in such buildings as barns and factories. In December 1915, the battalion had been billeted out of the line for a few days at Rue des Pretres, Poperinghe, Flanders. On the night of 6th/7th December 1915, the Battalion relieved the 7th King's Own Shropshire Light Infantry in the trenches to the South-east of Dickebusch, between St Eloi, a hamlet adjacent to Voormzele, and Spoil Bank on the canal bank. They would stay in the line until December 13th 1915, working alongside the 172nd Tunnelling Company Royal Engineers who were preparing explosive mines below ground. December 8th 1915 was described by 9th Brigade as "a quiet day" although the enemy intermittently fired artillery shells onto the trench line throughout the week the Battalion was in the line.
"Soldiers Died in the Great War" (HMSO 1921) recorded that on December 8th 1915, the 1st Battalion Northumberland Fusiliers lost two men killed, one was Arthur who was "killed in action"; the other was Daniel C. Jones who "died of wounds".
On the evening of 6th December 1915, the battalion marched into their trenches at St Eloi at 6.30 p.m. "Soon after passing Kruistraathouck there was a sudden outburst of artillery fire from both sides. Lille Road was shelled by enemy just before our arrival on that road. We had two men wounded by shrapnel" (War Diary, 1Bn Northumberland Fusiliers, National Archives WO 95/1430/2).
The hand-written casualty returns prepared by the adjutant, Second Lieutenant H.W. Cowtan Baker, showed two men "wounded" on the 6th December and a further two "wounded" on 7th December, including Daniel C Jones. A separate page recorded Daniel Jones "died of wounds" on 8th December. A further page has a lone entry in copying-pencil: "16644 Pte Bull A, "W" Company, 8.12.15; Killed" (The next page recorded Pte E. McGee attached 172nd Company RE "died alcoholic poison" 9.12.15.)
The war diary was handwritten in copying pencil on plain paper, not the official war diary forms, and parts of it were typed, probably when in billets, so it may have been compiled after events occurred.
The casualty returns do not record how a man died, only distinguishing between "died of wounds"; "killed in action" and "died" (which meant from causes other than enemy action). Given that the war diary mentions the exchange of artillery throughout this period in the trenches and that Arthur's death was recorded as "killed" it seems most likely that he was killed in the trenches by the explosion of a shell during an artillery barrage. "At 9.45 a.m. enemy shelled various parts of our line with shrapnel but did little or no damage" (War Diary, 1Bn Northumberland Fusiliers, 8th Dec. 1915; National Archives WO 95/1430/2).
With kind regards,
Alan
Reply from: Lollypop
Date: Saturday 8th February 2014 at 7:21 PM

Thank you so very much for bringing Arthur to us in such detail. Gosh I think you are so marvelous that you have all this knowledge of knowing just where you can locate records. Thank you. Lollypop
Posted by: P Steadman {Email left}
Location: Worksop
Date: Friday 7th February 2014 at 3:59 PM
Dear Alan,
I have a MIC for William Steadman, Royal Warwickshire Regiment, Reg No 8894. Can you decipher the information on the card ? From the CWGC died 25.4.15 (somewhere in France)
The family seem to think he was married in the early 20c, there is no record of him in the 1911 census, could he be serving abroad with the regiment and would his wife accompany him ? Pheew.

Regards,
Phil.
Reply from: Alan Greveson
Date: Saturday 8th February 2014 at 7:08 PM

Dear Phil,
The medal card recorded William Steadman, 8894, Royal Warwickshire Regiment, qualified for the 1914 Star with Mons clasp; The British War Medal and the Victory Medal. He entered a theatre of war on 27th August 1914 and was killed in action.
The CWGC Debt of Honour recorded he died on April 25th 1915 while serving with the 1st Battalion Royal Warwickshire Regiment and is commemorated on the Menin Gate memorial. He has no marked grave.
The 1st Battalion Royal Warwickshire Regiment served with the 10th Infantry Brigade in the 4th Division. The Division landed in France on 22nd August 1914, although many elements, including William it seems, arrived later to fight at The Battle of the Marne, The Battle of the Aisne and The Battle of Messines. They took part in the Second Battle of Ypres from 22nd April to 25th May 1915. William was killed in one of the failed counter-attacks on Sunday April 25th at St Julien. See:
http://www.cwgc.org/ypres/content.asp?id=111&menu=subsub
Soldiers serving overseas in 1911 were recorded in the England and Wales census. The 1st Battalion Royal Warwickshire Regiment was in India where it had served at Belgaum in 1901; Quetta, 1904; Peshawar 1908 and then in Bombay in 1910 moving to Aden in 1911 and returning to the UK in 1912. A year in Aden usually ended a period of service in India and the posting was considered one of the worst possible because of the climate and location, guarding a coaling station and telegraph station for ships making the voyage through the Suez Canal.
In 1908, a W. Steadman, 8894, 1st Bn Royal Warwickshire Regiment qualified for the India General Service Medal with clasp: "North West Frontier" for participation in the Mohmand Expedition and earned at the action near Matta Mughal Khel, on April 24th 1908, when the Royal Warwickshire Regiment was in close combat with tribesmen.
No individual service record has survived for William so it is not possible to say when he enlisted, but it was perhaps about his 17th birthday which fell in 1903 (He was baptised January 8th 1886). Common terms of engagement were for a minimum of 12 years involving seven years with the colours (eight, if serving overseas) and the remainder on the Reserve. The name William Steadman does not appear on the military census return for the 1st Royal Warwickshire Regiment at Bombay in 1911 (RG14 34997/RD641). He could have been in transit as he may have ended his term of engagement in 1911 after eight years, with the final four years on the Reserve, being re-called to the colours in August 1914.
With kind regards,
Alan
Reply from: P Steadman
Date: Sunday 9th February 2014 at 11:30 AM

Dear Alan,

Thank you again for a very enlightening reply to my many questions. They will be a great help in the family research.

Best regards,
Phil.
Posted by: Frank Rogers {Email left}
Location: Haslingden Lancashire
Date: Friday 7th February 2014 at 3:07 PM
Alan,

Can you help me please in filling in the gaps of the WW1 activities of a great, great uncle of mine, Frank Ernest Rogers, who emigrated out to Canada from Clayton-le-Moors, Lancashire, and attested on the 18th December 1915 in Winnipeg. He was with the 27th Battalion Canadian Infantry, and died in hospital in Doullens on the 1st April 1918. On his attestation paper there is an original number 4611 which was crossed out and a further number - 514817 - put in its place. I do not know whether he died of an illness or as the result of wounds suffered in battle. I have heard that the Germans bombed the Citadel hospital in Doullens, but do not know whether such an attack was the cause of his death.

Regards,

Frank
Reply from: Alan Greveson
Date: Saturday 8th February 2014 at 7:09 PM

Dear Frank,
It is necessary to purchase his full service record from the Library and Archives Canada. See:
http://www.bac-lac.gc.ca/eng/discover/military-heritage/first-world-war/first-world-war-1914-1918-cef/Pages/canadian-expeditionary-force.aspx#e

The air raid on Doullens was on May29th/30th 1918.
Kind regards,
Alan
Reply from: Frank Rogerw
Date: Monday 10th February 2014 at 12:13 PM

Thank you for your kind assistance - much appreciated.

Regards,
Frank
Posted by: Frank Rogers {Email left}
Location: Haslingden Lancashire
Date: Thursday 6th February 2014 at 3:22 PM
Alan,

Could you possibly let me have details of my great-grandfather's war service in WW1. He was John Willie Rogers, no. 22168, of the 11th (Service) Battalion, East Lancashire Regiment.

All that I know is that he was not one of the original "Accrington Pals" - determined as those that left Accrington and districts to go to Caernarfon in February 1915.

Regards,

Frank Rogers
Reply from: Alan Greveson
Date: Thursday 6th February 2014 at 7:13 PM

Dear Frank,
John Willie Rogers was a married man with three children, working as a cotton weaver at Clayton le Moors when war was declared in August 1914. He volunteered to join the Army on 6th November 1915 at Accrington. He was aged 33 at a time when the maximum age for enlistment was 40. Despite being the family breadwinner he may have been persuaded to volunteer because a campaign was running at the time to encourage recruitment which had been tailing-off since the news of heavy losses at The Battle of Loos in September 1915. Besides, compulsory conscription was being discussed and it would have been preferable to volunteer locally than to be conscripted and have no choice at some time in the future. John allotted half his pay to his wife and the Government would have topped that up with a separation allowance for his wife and children.
The day after he enlisted at Accrington he was sent to Prees Heath Camp, Shropshire, where he joined the 12th (Reserve) Battalion The East Lancashire Regiment, which was a training battalion initially formed from the surplus men of the 11th Battalion (Accrington Pals) depot company. He became a corporal and remained with the training battalion until 28th August 1916 when he was posted as part of a draft of reinforcements to France. The next day he arrived at No 30 Infantry Base Depot, which was at Etaples, where he would have undergone additional training to inculcate "the offensive spirit". On September 10th 1916, he joined the 11th Battalion East Lancashire Regiment in the field. The 11th battalion served in the 94th Infantry Brigade in the 31st Division. The Division took part in The Battle of the Ancre between 13th and 18th November 1916.
On 22nd March 1917, John was taken out of the line and sent to work at the 94th Brigade bath house. The Brigade was in the Arras sector. John returned to the Battalion on 10th April and then returned to the bathhouse on 30th April 1917. On 28th June 1917 he was struck off the strength of the 11th Battalion East Lancashire Regiment. There was a gap of some weeks in his record as he next appeared as joining 228th Divisional Employment Company Labour Corps on 2nd September 1917. The 228th Divisional Employment Company of the Labour Corps was part of 31st Division and in June 1917 had taken over the role of operating the rear area facilities such as Divisional baths, laundry, cinema, theatre, canteens and recreation rooms, stores, clothing depot. So, it is probable John had remained with the baths, despite a change in title of the company operating the facilities. These men were generally men who had been wounded or were of lower physical strength caused by ill-health.
On 15th January 1918 he was again taken on the strength of the 11th Battalion East Lancashire Regiment. For their engagements in 1918, see:
http://www.1914-1918.net/31div.htm
He remained with them until 28th December 1918 when he was granted two weeks' leave in the UK. He returned to them in France 11th January 1919 and came back to England to be discharged from Heaton Park dispersal centre, Manchester, at the end of January 1919. He was placed on the Z Reserve on 9th February 1919. The Z Reserve was for men intended to be re-called if the Armistice did not hold. Service in the Z Reserve was deemed to have ended on March 31st 1920.
John qualified for the British War Medal and the Victory Medal.
With kind regards,
Alan
Reply from: Frank Rogers
Date: Friday 7th February 2014 at 1:18 PM

Alan,

So is it possible that the reason for his "disappearance" between the end of June 1917 and the beginning of September was down to recovering from either illness or wounding? If so, is there any way of finding out the exact reason?

Regards,

Frank
Reply from: Alan Greveson
Date: Saturday 8th February 2014 at 7:45 PM

Dear Frank,
The gap is in the sequence of entries on his service record, so it is a gap on paper rather than a disappearance. Had he been admitted to hospital that would have been recorded. I suspect he remained with the baths during the period the operation of the 94th Brigade baths was transferred to the 228th Employment Company and the paperwork was recorded at a later date.
With kind regards,
Alan
Reply from: Frank Rogers
Date: Monday 10th February 2014 at 12:18 PM

Thank you for all the valuable information - I believe that I have seen somewhere that he had a couple of negative items attached to his records, one of which I think related to him being reduced to the ranks due to missing a parade.

Regards,

Frank
Posted by: Stephen {Email left}
Location: Belfast
Date: Thursday 6th February 2014 at 9:25 AM
Hello Alan can you give me any information on James Murphy of Nile Street in the York Street area of Belfast. He joined up in the Rex Bar and was a RIR. Thank you.
Reply from: Alan Greveson
Date: Thursday 6th February 2014 at 7:12 PM

Dear Stephen,
Unfortunately, it is not possible to positively identify an individual with the frequently occurring name of James Murphy without knowing his regimental number. Very few surviving records state biographical details such as an address, so only the name is left and the RIR could stand for Royal Irish Regiment or the Royal Irish Rifles.
With kind regards,
Alan
Posted by: Frank Rogers {Email left}
Location: Haslingden Lancashire
Date: Tuesday 4th February 2014 at 11:30 PM
Alan,

I am endeavouring to discover information relating to the WW1 activities of Fred Riley (born in Apr/May/Jun 1887) and living in Haslingden at the time of the 1911 census. Family members have been unable to trace any details, but information within the family says he was a stretcher bearer, and was wounded during the war. Unfortunately we do not have details of an Army number. I appreciate that this might be a lost cause.
Reply from: Alan Greveson
Date: Wednesday 5th February 2014 at 6:24 PM

Dear Frank,
Unfortunately, without knowing the regiment and regimental number it is not possible to identify any surviving record for Fred Riley.
With kind regards,
Alan
Posted by: Phil Steadman {Email left}
Location: Worksop
Date: Tuesday 4th February 2014 at 2:13 PM
Dear Alan,
Your excellent forum may be able to help me with information displayed on a MIC for Enoch Steadman, Cheshire Reg (batt not known) Private . Reg No 26845.
Gallipoli - date of entry 4 Sept 1915 . Discharged 29 June 1915 do you think their is a mistake with the entry of the dates ?

Many thanks,
Phil.
Reply from: Alan Greveson
Date: Tuesday 4th February 2014 at 6:43 PM

Dear Phil,
Enoch Steadman was a 37 year old gardener of 41 Lime Street, Ellesmere Port, who volunteered to enlist at Chester on 8th June 1915 and joined The Cheshire Regiment where he was allotted the regimental number 26845. An Army medal rolls index card recorded he first entered a theatre of war (2B Balkans Gallipoli) on 4th September 1915 with the Cheshire Regiment. That date of entry is later than the arrival of the three battalions of the Cheshire Regiment that served at Gallipoli: the 8th Battalion arrived July 1915; the 4th and the 7th arrived on 9th August 1915. Enoch was therefore probably part of a draft of reinforcements to one of those three battalions.
The 8th Battalion was a wartime-only service battalion raised for the war. The 4th and 7th Battalions were existing pre-war part-time Territorial Force battalions. The Territorial battalions allotted four-digit and six-digit regimental numbers to their men. Men who enlisted in war-time training or service battalions were allotted five-digit regimental numbers. Had Enoch had a four-digit regimental number in 1915, he would certainly have been in the 4th or 7th Battalion. While there is no further evidence, his five-digit number implies that Enoch served in a training battalion in the UK and then a service battalion: which would have been the 8th Battalion The Cheshire Regiment at Gallipoli. As it is, the experiences of the three battalions at Suvla Bay were similar.
An entry on a War Badge roll recorded he was discharged, no longer physically fit for war service (King's Regulations paragraph 392), through sickness on 29th June 1916 from the W.C.D. Depot which was a convalescent hospital known as Western Command Depot at Heaton Park in Manchester. "Sickness" for men who had served at Gallipoli was generally caused by the men being exposed to the severe winter weather of November and December 1915. Trench Foot and Trench Fever were common.
The 8th Battalion served in 13th Division which had fought at The Battle of Sari Bair; The Battle of Russell's Top and The Battle of Hill 60, at ANZAC Cove in August 1915, before Enoch arrived. They then transferred to Suvla Bay. They were evacuated from Suvla Bay on the 19th and 20th of December 1915, and a week later they went to the Helles bridgehead. They fought again at the last Turkish attacks at Helles on the 7th of January 1916 and were withdrawn from Helles on the 8th and 9th January 1916.
The 4th and 7th Battalions remained at Suvla Bay from 9th August and fought with the 53rd Division
which suffered heavy losses by the time the Division was withdrawn to Mudros on the 11th of December 1916 and then moving to Egypt on December 20th.
Casualties from Gallipoli generally returned home on hospital ships after being treated at hospitals in Cairo or Malta.
For a contemporary account of the Gallipoli campaign by John Masefield, who ran an ambulance ship, see:
https://archive.org/details/gallipoligun00mase
With kind regards,
Alan
Reply from: Phil
Date: Tuesday 4th February 2014 at 11:22 PM

Dear Alan,

Thank you for a very quick reply to my question regarding Enoch. Everything fits now.

Many many thanks for your time and effort.

Best regards,
Phil

The forum has 242 pages containing 2418 messages
-10   Prev Page   20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28   Next Page   10+

Don't forget to BOOKMARK this page to your FAVORITES.