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Alan Greveson's World War I Forum (Page 24)

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Posted by: Garry Reed {Email left}
Location: Durham
Date: Monday 27th May 2013 at 6:42 PM
Hi Alan could you please help me I'm looking for my great uncle born 1903 at pelton. And have just found a listing of a ww1 medal record held by the wo. It might be him I don't know. It's William earnest Watson. The record is wo. 372/21/41504 durham light infantry.3740. Could it be him. This record was 1914 to1920. Could you please help me. Garry.
Reply from: Alan Greveson
Date: Monday 27th May 2013 at 7:29 PM

Dear Garry,
If your great uncle was born in 1903 (General Register Office births Jan-Mar 1903 William Ernest Watson, Chester le Street vol 10a page 587) he would have been eleven years old and still attending school at the outbreak of the First World War in August 1914. The minimum school-leaving age in 1914 was 12. After national registration on August 15th 1915 the government knew the age of all young men and when they would attain their 18th birthday for compulsory conscription. Your great uncle would not have been old enough to be called-up until early in 1921, more than two years after the war had ended. The medal card belonging to William Ernest Watson 3740 Durham Light Infantry indicated that he was commissioned as an officer on 10th December 1915 when your great uncle was aged twelve. As your great uncle was born in 1903 the only documents in the public domain that would list him are the 1911 census and his GRO marriage and death index entries.
Kind regards,
Alan




Posted by: William {Email left}
Location: Birmingham
Date: Sunday 26th May 2013 at 3:40 AM
Hi,
Does anyone have a list of names to go along with the Northumberland Fusiliers photos?
http://www.circlecity.co.uk/wartime/misc/group1.php
http://www.circlecity.co.uk/wartime/misc/group2.php
Any help is much appreciated

Thanks
William Middleton


Posted by: Bella
Location: Esher
Date: Saturday 25th May 2013 at 2:40 PM
Dear Alan,

Apologies for intruding your weekend.

Alfred Johnson, born 1872, Horton Kirby, Kent. Parents James & Jane Johnson, living Otford, Kent.

Any information would be greatly appreciated.

Kind regards.

Bella
Reply from: Alan Greveson
Date: Saturday 25th May 2013 at 4:05 PM

Dear Bella,
I cannot do "anything" searches. It might take a lifetime.
Kind regards,
Alan
Reply from: Alan Greveson
Date: Saturday 25th May 2013 at 9:18 PM

Dear Bella,
Take a look at the 1911 census for Alfred Johnson born South Darenth (which was Horton Kirby) married to Edith Fanny Wainright, and working as a chauffeur to the Reverend Arthur King at Woodhouse, Loughborough, Leicestershire. Marriage at Barrow upon Soar, in 1900. It could be him.
Kind regards,
Alan
Reply from: Bella
Date: Sunday 26th May 2013 at 8:28 AM

Dear Alan,

I did and it was.

Many, many thanks.

Bella


Posted by: Penny Walker {Email left}
Location: New Zealand
Date: Saturday 25th May 2013 at 2:05 PM
Hi, I am looking for some assistance in understanding military jargon so I can make sense of my gtgrandfathers movements in WW1 - Septimus Walker #25699 & #700197 & #297777 born Tanfield, Durham and lived Newcastle. He was a coalminer and attested 7/12/15. 18th Lab Coy (France) 19.6.19 - 26.4.20? this is after the war, so what would he be doing? Also, 3-12-17 338th RE, and A company 391st 2-11-17 BEF pnr. I have this info off Ancestry website but get lost in the abbreviations. I did see he had a tatoo of a woman on his arm so that kind of makes it more real. Any help would be greatly appreciated.
Reply from: Alan Greveson
Date: Saturday 25th May 2013 at 5:54 PM

Dear Penny,
Septimus Walker enlisted under the Derby Scheme on 7th December 1915. The Derby Scheme was a last call for volunteers before compulsory conscription was introduced in 1916. Under the scheme men were able to "join now and serve later". Septimus Walker was placed on the reserve on 8th December 1915, which meant that he was sent home to his civilian work until called for. As a married miner with children he was not called up until eighteen months later on 30th July 1917 when he was enlisted into the Royal Engineers Road Construction Companies at Salamanca Barracks, Aldershot. He trained with them as a "pioneer" (unskilled labourer) until 2 November 1917 when he was posted to 391 Road Construction Company. On 3rd December 1917 he was posted to France and spent a short while at a base depot before he joined 338 Road Construction Company on 14th December 1917. He remained with them (apart from an unspecified stay in hospital) until Christmas 1918 when he arrived at Ripon on 23rd December 1918 for discharge as a miner. He was actually discharged from the Royal Engineers on 21 January 1919 and posted to the Class Z Reserve which was the reserve that was liable to call-up if the Armistice did not hold. He either volunteered or was called-up again to join the Labour Corps North Command Depot at Ripon on 30th May 1919. Back in uniform he was posted to 18 Labour Company in France on 19th June 1919. The 18th Labour Company was a graves exhumation company based at Hulluch, Pas de Calais. Their task was to clear the area of bodies and scattered graves. He was finally discharged on 26th April 1920.
He qualified for the British War Medal and the Victory Medal.
Kind regards,
Alan
Reply from: Penny Walker
Date: Sunday 26th May 2013 at 10:34 AM

Dear Alan,
Thankyou so very much Alan, you have helped me to make sense of it all and given very good explanations. I am able to google some of the places you mentioned and get a sense of what it must of been like. Thanks again.
Kind Regards
Penny


Posted by: Huby
Location: Chichester
Date: Tuesday 21st May 2013 at 9:58 AM
Dear Alan,
I have read much of the research you have undertaken for people wanting to learn more about their forefathers and am incredibly impressed. I have written to you before but sadly gave insufficient detail for you to return any more information. If I may, I would like to take more of your time, but on this occasion with some data about my grandfather's WW1 service and hope you may be able to explain what happened to him.

Wilfred George HUBERT was born in Guernsey, Channel Islands in May 1892, he married in February 1916, and on his marriage certificate his occupation is given as '9th Divisional Ammunition Column'.

I have so far been unable to find his record of service, but his Medal Index card shows that he enlisted as a Gunner, service number 91263, with the Royal Field Artillery on the 8th of January 1916. He left the island with the second draft of the 9th Divisional Ammunition Column in June 1916 for France, but was wounded in action on 15th July 1916. He then spent time at Royal Artillery Command Depot in Ripon, but not discharged until 1st April 1918 under 'Army Orders 265/17 Para 2 A1', whatever that might mean.

He died in 1967 before I was able to ask him any questions about the war, and I have never heard his experience discussed since, other than to be told that his marital home was named 'Sefton', supposedly after the place where he spent time recovering from his injuries.

I would really like to know as near as possible, what his job might have entailed; where he was fighting when he was wounded; where and why he spent so long recovering from his injuries and whether you think it possible he would have returned home for short spells before his official discharge. I am wondering if he suffered from shell-shock.

Thank you for any extra information you can give me.
Huby
Reply from: Alan Greveson
Date: Tuesday 21st May 2013 at 6:51 PM

Dear Huby,
Unfortunately, it is not possible to provide definite details from the surviving information. Wilfred Hubert enlisted on 18th January 1916. His marriage certificate stated he was with the 9th Divisional Ammunition Column (DAC). An ammunition column existed in its own right to deliver ammunition to the gun batteries within the Division. It also acted as a dispersal unit for artillerymen, posting drafts to the gun batteries as required. The 9th Divisional Ammunition Column was raised on Guernsey but was sent to Scotland to join the 9th (Scottish) Division in 1915. On July 15th 1916 the 9th Division was engaged at the Battle of Bazentin at which the Division captured Longueval.
The medal card which named the Royal Artillery Command Depot at Ripon referred to a silver War Badge awarded for discharge through wounds. A soldier who was in hospital was struck off the strength of his fighting unit and placed on the administrative strength of a depot, for pay and allowances. There is no evidence he was physically at the depot (which was at North Camp, Ripon) for any length of time as he may have been simply administered by the depot. Gunner Hubert would have spent the time between being wounded and being discharged in hospital and convalescing.
Army Order 265/17 Para 2 A refers to Army Order 265 II "Silver War Badge" dated 10th August 1917 and published in September 1917 which defined the qualification for a war badge. It was the authority by which the badge was issued.
Gunner Hubert qualified for the British War Medal and the Victory Medal. See also:
http://www.greatwarci.net/guernsey/9dac/9dac.pdf

Kind regards,
Alan
Reply from: Huby
Date: Saturday 25th May 2013 at 5:39 PM

Thank you very much, Alan. You have given me more information than I already had, which will be very useful.


Posted by: Bella
Location: Esher
Date: Monday 20th May 2013 at 10:43 PM
Dear Alan,

Followed your instructions to the letter: Military, scrolled to find "UK Silver War Badge Records 1914-18. It wasn't there! No matter, I did locate his British Army WW1 medal roll index card, it appears on this that his reg no.is 50545 and not 75 which could have been mistaken for either. It states cause of discharge: A.O. V1/18 - Para A. Can you advise?

Thanking you in anticipation.

Regards

Bella
Reply from: Alan Greveson
Date: Tuesday 21st May 2013 at 8:54 PM

Dear Bella,
There are two medal cards. One is for the British War and Victory Medals which are listed as Francis Johnson 50575. The other is for the silver War Badge. A.O. vi/18 was Army Order No 6 of 1918 paragraph A, which would have been an army order amending either the cause of discharge (no longer physical fit for war service) under King's Regulations paragraph 392 or amending the qualification for the award of the silver War Badge. It is not a "cause of discharge" so much as an authority under which the discharge was confirmed or the Badge was awarded. It was purely administrative.
Regarding the War Badge rolls, if you go to "Search" then "Military" there is a "more." button to click under the Military records listed on the right.
Kind regards,
Alan
Reply from: Bella
Date: Wednesday 22nd May 2013 at 6:13 AM

Many thanks Alan,

Bella


Posted by: Victoria Harley {Email left}
Location: Spain
Date: Sunday 19th May 2013 at 10:14 PM
Dear Alan,

It has been sometime since I have last messaged you. I hope you and yours are well.

I am researching my Great Great grandmother's 2nd husband. Her first husband George Salt my grt grt grandfather, died in service which you have kindly helped me with before.

His name is William Edward Berkshire and I have a copy of his medal card, which just states his name as William Berkshire.

William Berkshire (In order on his card as below)
Machine Gun corps. 100187
Staffordshire Yeomanry, 3320
RR Calvalry, 300588

He is awarded the British Medal. CMG/102A. Page 3 (I know the medal was awarded for the MGC, because the medal is inscripted with the 100187 number)

I was just wondering how he could be involved in all three services and why?
I have found some information on the Staffs Yeomanry, but the RR Calvalry comes up with nothing.

Any info would be of such great help.

Best wishes,

Victoria.
Reply from: Alan Greveson
Date: Monday 20th May 2013 at 2:50 PM

Dear Victoria,
There is nothing unusual in a soldier serving in more than one regiment. It is unusual for a soldier to be awarded only the British War Medal. For service in the First World War before the Armistice, the British War Medal was general accompanied by the Victory Medal. The British War Medal was issued on its own to soldiers who served in the North Russia Relief Force in the summer of 1919, or other post-armistice conflicts such as South Russia (Black Sea) 1919 or Afghanistan 1919, so it is possible that William Berkshire only served overseas, with the Machine Gun Corps, in one of the campaigns in 1919. Soldiers who served in Afghanistan would have qualified for the 1908 India General Service Medal with the clasp "Afghanistan N.W.F. 1919" where NWF stood for North West Frontier, so that might rule out service in Afghanistan in 1919.
The Staffordshire Yeomanry (Queen's Own Royal Regiment) formed three regiments during the war. The original regiment was part of the pre-war part-time Territorial Force of volunteer cavalry and it became the 1st/1st Staffordshire Yeomanry which was supplemented by the 2nd/1st and 3rd/1st Staffordshire Yeomanry which both served only in the UK during the war. The 2nd/1st served as cyclists in Kent. In 1915 the 3rd/1st Staffordshire Yeomanry was raised at Aldershot and was affiliated to the 12th Reserve Cavalry Regiment in 1916 and was then absorbed by the 3rd Reserve Cavalry Regiment in April 1917. It seems possible that William Berkshire served in the 3rd/1st Staffordshire Yeomanry and the 3rd Reserve Cavalry Regiment at Aldershot as he had regimental numbers in both units before he joined the Machine Gun Corps. If that were the case he remained in the UK during the First World War.
The medal index card refers to the actual medal roll that includes his name which is held at the National Archives at Kew, Surrey. The roll is numbered CMG/102A (page 3) where the CMG stands for Machine Gun Corps (Cavalry and Motors) which suggests that William served in a mounted section of the machine gun corps (as opposed to infantry). The roll might state which unit he served with in order to qualify for the medal. You can visit the archives or pay for a researcher to look up the roll entry for you.
Kind regards,
Alan
Reply from: Victoria Harley
Date: Tuesday 18th June 2013 at 3:57 PM

Thank you so much for your reply Alan. It really does mean a lot. Best wishes.


Posted by: Bella
Location: Esher
Date: Sunday 19th May 2013 at 8:30 PM
Dear Alan,

Through your help have informatin on my Grandfather Frank Johnson, born 1881 Otford, Kent. Served in WW1 King's Liverpool Regiment No.50575and have his medals so would have served overseas. On trying to locate his Army Pensions Record came up with Frank Johnson, born 1881, Age at enlistment 34, Document Year 1915, Regimental No,122233, Army Service Corps. Details of home address, Larkhill Lane, Clapham (where my Father, his son, was born in 1911) "SHORT SERVICE" 4/Liverpool.

Are you able to solve my confusion?

Many, many thanks.

Regards

Bella
Reply from: Alan Greveson
Date: Sunday 19th May 2013 at 9:45 PM

Dear Bella,
There's no need to be confused. Like so many soldiers, Frank served in more than one unit during the war. Frank Johnson, a 34 year old baker, volunteered to join-up at Great Scotland Yard on 8th June 1915. He was enlisted into the Army Service Corps and may have served at Aldershot, as his attestation was approved at "Ashot". He could well have served as a baker in the ASC because they did operate the army's bakeries. He remained in the UK until 1917. On 23rd March 1917 he was transferred to the 70th Training Reserve Battalion, which was formed at Merseyside and then moved to Ripon. From the training reserve battalion (where he would have been trained as an infantryman) he was posted to the 4th Battalion The King's (Liverpool Regiment), which was then serving in France, on 3rd July 1917. While Frank was with them, the Battalion saw action at The Battle of the Menin Road Ridge; The Battle of Polygon Wood (both in The Third Battle of Ypres, or "Passchendaele" in 1917) and then, in 1918,The Battle of Messines; The Battle of Hazebrouck and The Battle of Bailleul. He was taken prisoner on 16th April 1918. The majority of British prisoners were taken in March/April 1918 when the enemy launched their Spring Offensive (Operation Michael) in the Somme area. The 4th King's Liverpool Regiment fought in the Battle of Bailleul at the time of his capture. Frank was repatriated on 18th November 1918 and he was medically examined by a TMB – travelling medical board – at Dover Rest Camp. He weighed seven stone and was suffering from debility after starvation as a prisoner in Belgium. He was discharged from the Army four days later. Frank qualified for the British War Medal and the Victory Medal and was awarded a silver War Badge for being discharged through sickness.
Kind regards,
Alan
Reply from: Bella
Date: Monday 20th May 2013 at 5:47 AM

Dear Alan,

Cannot thank you enough for all information/

Kind regards.

Bella
Reply from: Bella
Date: Monday 20th May 2013 at 6:59 PM

Dear Alan,

I did reply early am this morning, thanking you for information on my Grandfather Frank Johnson. who was taken prisoner after the battle of Bailleul March/April 1918. The details you gave of his health as a prisoner in Belguim were quite sad and although I was 11 years old when he died in 1950 and I used to see him every week until that point I don't ever remember us talking about his experiences. May be then I was too young to understand.

Could I ask you that the details you furnished, can I see them on a particular sight myself (or isn't that the done thing! which is fair game. It's just that it would be nice to print out the "formal" details.

Kind regards and best wishes.

Bella
Reply from: Alan Greveson
Date: Monday 20th May 2013 at 8:11 PM

Dear Bella,
I wondered why you hadn't seen the information if you had seen his "short service attestation" and I suspect it is to do with the arrangement of the Ancestry website. Frank's service record is contained in the "pension" records available by subscription on the ancestry.co.uk website. If you do not have a subscription, your local library may offer free access to the ancestry website. Because the website has many millions of different records, the search engine can only be taught to recognise certain pages within a document. These are known as "the landing page" which is what you see when you click the mouse on "view image". In military records, the search engine is taught to recognise Attestation forms and discharge forms. However, when you click the mouse, you see only the landing page and it is necessary to search either side of the landing page to see a complete file belonging to one man. And you need to check regimental numbers on the paperwork as each separate file will be for a man with the same name as all the "Frank Johnsons" are filed together. On the ancestry website's document viewer there is a thin bar at the top which indicates which page you are on. There are little back and forward arrows to the right of the page number. So when you click on "view image" you land on page J > Jo> Joh > 10027 of 45903 with two tiny black triangles. Frank's file actually starts two pages back on page 10024 (a duplicate enlistment form) and finishes a dozen pages forward on page 10036. Click on the black arrowheads to move backwards and forwards through the file.
His war badge roll is also on the Ancestry site. Search for it under "military" using surname only and then scroll through the results for his regimental number. The roll entry is on one page only, so what you see is what you get. From the home page on the Ancestry site use the navigation bar at the top with the buttons "Home"; "Family Tree" & "Search". Hover the mouse over "Search" and scroll down to "Military". In "Military" scroll down to "UK Silver War Badge Records 1914-1920" and click on that title. Then search for Frank Johnson. In the results, look for his regimental number in the column on the right. Click on "view image".
You get better results (and save on black ink) if you save the images to your computer (orange button; top right) and then edit the images by cropping off all the black background. Ideally, take the images (on CD or memory stick) to a print shop and have them enlarged onto A3 sized paper to 8 1/2 × 13 1/2 in (216 x 343 mm) which was their original foolscap folio size. National Archives copyright is waived if the images are for your own use.
Kind regards,
Alan
Reply from: Bella
Date: Monday 20th May 2013 at 9:31 PM

Dear Alan,

Marvellous!

Thank you so much.

Shall be sending a donation to BL.

Bella


Posted by: Doug Macdonald {Email left}
Location: Kelowna Bc Canada
Date: Friday 17th May 2013 at 4:54 AM
Hello I was given these very old photos of my Great Granddad who served in the 132nd Machine Gun Company.Grantham,1916 ..Now the problem is even thou I have never got to meet him I would like to know where he is in this picture.. This photo is a very long photo the was done by Panoras 60 DOUGTY ST W.C. and there was a number too No.1156 ... Now I have several old war photos,but I thought I would start with this one first..I really don't know too much about him all I know is his last name is Mac Donald .. Both my parents have passed on,and my father did not talk about him ,so therefore I am kinda stuck, and my wife is encouraging me to do a family tree which I am curious and wanting to know more about his military background , his military records and was there any medals given to him for his serves .. We also find out more information about him too ... I will explain to you what this photo looks like there are 10 top officers and the gentleman in the middle is wearing a soft like rounded helmet and the rest of the soldiers are wearing like a hat that you would wear in the Africian Safari but it is a helmets and in the middle it looks like a 2 swords in the cross with a royal crown above it .. there are 135 men in the platoon.

My wife thinks by looking at the emblem she thinks he might of served for the Royal British Military that is her guess ? I really don't know she might be right but who really knows ? Well I ,my wife hope this will get us started in finding out about my Great Granddad .. P.S. Is there anyway you can tell us where
my Great Granddad is in this photo,so we can show our kids (5) and our grandkids please.. Thank-you ever so much we will be waiting to hear from you

Doug & Doreen


Posted by: Mary Kibble
Location: Embleton
Date: Wednesday 15th May 2013 at 2:26 PM
Dear Alan,
You kindly answered a query for me recently so I wondered if I could bother you again. This is about George Ewart Wade b. 1896 in Embleton Northumberland. George was a gunner with the RGA 351 Siege Battalion, No.123022. He died on 11.10.1917 and is buried at Brandhoek New Military Cemetery No. 3. Apart from that I know nothing about him as his service record is missing and I can only find limited information about his battlation. Any other information you can provide will be most helpful. Many thanks.
Mary Kibble
Reply from: Alan Greveson
Date: Wednesday 15th May 2013 at 9:06 PM

Dear Mary,
George Ewart Wade was born at Christon Bank in the April-June quarter of 1896 the son of Frank and Annie Wade, who ran the Beehive grocer's Stores on Front Street (Pavement) Christon Bank (recorded in the 1891 and 1911 censuses). Frank was also the parish assistant overseer and rate collector (1911). Frank was the son of a master carpenter and had started out as a pupil school teacher at Wath upon Dearne, later moving to Embleton where he was the head school master living in the school master's house, Embleton, in the 1881 census. George Wade was one of nine children. At the outbreak of war, in 1914, he would have been 18 although he appears not to have gone abroad until 1917. An Army medal rolls index card recorded he served as a gunner, 123022, in the Royal Garrison Artillery. The six-digit number beginning 123 appears to be a wartime "general service" number typical of those allotted to men who had been in neither the pre-war RGA nor the Territorials. The numbers beginning 123 appear to have been allotted late in 1916 to both conscripts and to men who had earlier attested under the Derby Scheme for deferred enlistment in December 1915. For example,
Andrew Welsh of Fallodon Mill, Christon Bank, was the son of Andrew Scott Welsh the parish relieving officer and Registrar. Andrew Welsh volunteered under the Derby Scheme in December 1915 but was not called up until 11th October 1916 to No 4 Depot RGA at Clipstone Camp near Mansfield where he was allotted the RGA number 123024.
Once a gunner left the depot and was sent abroad to a base camp he could have served in any Battery that was required of him.
"Soldiers Died in the Great War" (HMSO 1921) recorded George Ewart Wade "died of wounds" on October 11th 1917. The CWGC Debt of Honour recorded that he died while with the 351 Siege Battery RGA and was buried in a named grave in plot II, row L, grave 13, at Brandhoek Military Cemetery No 3. The CWGC says "the arrival of the 32nd, 3rd Australian and 44th Casualty Clearing Stations, in preparation for the new Allied offensive launched that month, [July] made it necessary to open the New Military Cemetery. The New Military Cemetery No 3 opened in August and continued in use until May 1918." The Campaign was the Third Battle of Ypres (31 July - 10 November 1917).
Different sources give different dates for when 351 Siege Battery arrived in France: April 1917 or January 1917. It was equipped with four six-inch howitzers. On May 5th 1917 the Battery became part of 88 Heavy Artillery Group. In June 1917 it came under command of II Corps for a few days; XIX Corps and then 58 Heavy Artillery Group. On 6th July 1917 it moved to 48 Heavy Artillery Group and on 8th August to 70 Heavy Artillery Group.
On 17th August 1917 it was strengthened by the addition of two extra guns and men from 407 Siege Battery. 315 Battery then joined 48 Artillery Brigade, RGA, on 9th September 1917.
Given that Gunner Wade had apparently reached a Casualty Clearing Station by October 11th it is most likely he was wounded at the Battle of Poelcapelle, 9 October 1917 or possibly the Battle of Broodseinde, 4 October 1917. When he died he had been serving with 351 Siege Battery, Royal Garrison Artillery but it is not known if he served with any other battery beforehand. He qualified for the British War Medal and the Victory Medal.
See "The Watch on the Rhine" in which the title of a patriotic German song was parodied by 351 Siege Battery when they formed part of the British Army of Occupation in December 1918.
http://www.oucs.ox.ac.uk/ww1lit/gwa/document/9039/4034
Kind regards,
Alan
Reply from: Mary Kibble
Date: Thursday 16th May 2013 at 7:24 AM

Dear Alan,
Thank you once again for your generous help with my queries. Best wiahes.
Mary Kibble


Posted by: Simon {Email left}
Location: Newark
Date: Monday 13th May 2013 at 4:56 PM
I posted on another thread where you had mentioned my grandfather second Lt William Carrington 43600 2nd Batt KOYLI. He was in Dublin castle at the outbreak of war and my understanding is that he went to France and then possibly was a replacement for the disastrous losses the KOYLI suffered at Le Cateau in late August. The Regimental museum suggests he was seconded to the Suffolks? But this was not kown in the family and I seemed to have lost track of his whereabouts from that point in time...I have his Mons star and he was also awarded a military OBE for his services as well as being promoted to Captain. I would be interested if you could dig up a little more...I know that he also served in WWII and was retired on health grounds with the Hon title of Major. I think he had some shrapnel in his shoulder which probably plagued him...a not uncommon ocurrence no doubt!
Reply from: Alan Greveson
Date: Monday 13th May 2013 at 7:15 PM

Dear Simon,
Service records of officers who fought in both wars are not in the public domain. As William Carrington served in the Second World War his records would still be held by the Ministry of Defence. The MOD will release certain amounts of information about a deceased person depending on whether you are the direct next-of-kin, or not. You can apply for a search using the different application forms for next-of-kin, or with permission of next-of-kin, or as a general enquirer. See:
http://www.veterans-uk.info/service_records/service_records.html

Click on the link and then look for "Service records - requests for service records of deceased service personnel and home guard" in the left-hand column.
You will need proof of death (copy of death certificate); the soldier's date of birth or service number; and next-of-kin's signed permission (unless you are the direct next-of-kin), known as form Part 1. You then need a completed form Part 2 (search details), and cheque for payment. The next-of-kin form (Part 1) is for completion by the next-of-kin of deceased service personnel (or enquirers with the consent of next of kin). The Part 2 form is entitled: "Request forms for service personnel – Army" A cheque for GBP 30 should be made payable to "The MOD Accounting Officer" and sent to Army Personnel Centre Secretariat, Disclosures 2, Mail Point 515, Kentigern House, 65, Brown Street, Glasgow G2 8EX Scotland with all the paperwork.
Searches take several months to complete

An Army medal rolls index card recorded that in December 1917 Captain William Carrington was attached to J Infantry Base Depot at Etaples, France. The government publication "The London Gazette" recorded Yorks. L.I.—Lt. W. Carrington is sec[onde]d, for empl[oyment] as Adj[jutant] of a Base Depot. 15th Aug. 1916.
And:
Officers Training Corps: Mount St. Mary's Coll. Contgt., Jun. Div.— Capt. W. G. A. Carrington, O.B.E., 3rd Bn. K.O.Y.L.I., is attd. for duty with and to comd. the Contgt. 30th July 1937.
Then:
INFANTRY. MILITIA. K.O.Y.L.I. Capt. W. G. A. Carrington, O.B.E. (43600), to relinquish his commn. on account of ill-health, 11th Feb. 1944, and to be granted the hon. rank of Maj.
You can search the London Gazette online:
http://www.london-gazette.co.uk/search

The medal card gave his date of entry into France as either 18th August or 23rd August 1914. He was in fact a reinforcement sent to 2nd Battalion KOYLI and arriving with them after the retreat from Mons which ended in the village of Tournan, 15 miles from Paris on September 4th 1914. The regimental history states: "While in a bivouac here south of the town the KOYLI received its first reinforcement being joined by 2/Lt W Carrington and eight rank and file".

Kind regards
Alan
Reply from: Simon
Date: Monday 13th May 2013 at 7:27 PM

Alan

Thank you so much...I had come across the so called burn't records of first world war officers which were partly destroyed in the blitz, but this is so much more than I could have asked for, and a completely different angle to tackle my research!

I am very,very grateful sir.

Many thanks

Simon


Posted by: Bella
Location: Esher
Date: Sunday 12th May 2013 at 4:32 PM
Dear Alan,

On my Grandfather's medal are his name, regiment and no.(WW1) on my Father's, just his name, (WWII) is there a reason for this? as it's making quite difficult to find him. Have searched war records site, to no avail.

Can you shed any light? I would be grateful.

Bella
Reply from: Alan Greveson
Date: Sunday 12th May 2013 at 8:38 PM

Dear Bella,
Men who qualified for medals for service in the Second World War had to apply for their medals from 1948 onwards, after the qualification requirements had been agreed by the Government. Most servicemen by that date had returned to civilian life and they were invited to complete application forms for medals which were made available at Post Offices. The medals were either for service in a specific theatre of war or for more general wartime service. The medals were not generally named, so it is possible your father had his medal engraved himself. There is no online database for Second World War Medals and information about their award is not in the public domain. Next-of-kin who wish to know what medals their relative was entitled to in 1948 can enquire in writing to:
Service Personnel and Veterans Agency (SPVA)
(Joint Personnel Administration Centre)
Ministry of Defence Medal Office
G36, Innsworth House
Imjin Barracks
Gloucester GL3 1HW

Legal next-of-kin (if both the ex-Service person and their spouse are deceased) who wish to check which medals were issued to their deceased relative will be asked to provide proof of death and confirmation that they are next of kin.
If you are seeking a service record, that would still be held by the Ministry of Defence. The MOD will release certain amounts of information about a deceased person depending on whether you are the direct next-of-kin, or not. You can apply for a search using the different application forms for next-of-kin, or with permission of next-of-kin, or as a general enquirer. See:
http://www.veterans-uk.info/service_records/service_records.html

Click on the link and then look for "Service records - requests for service records of deceased service personnel and home guard" in the left-hand column.
You will need proof of death (copy of death certificate); the soldier's date of birth or service number; and next-of-kin's signed permission (unless you are the direct next-of-kin), known as form Part 1. You then need a completed form Part 2 (search details), and cheque for payment. The next-of-kin form (Part 1) is for completion by the next-of-kin of deceased service personnel (or enquirers with the consent of next of kin). The Part 2 form is entitled: "Request forms for service personnel – Army" A cheque for GBP 30 should be made payable to "The MOD Accounting Officer" and sent to Army Personnel Centre Secretariat, Disclosures 2, Mail Point 515, Kentigern House, 65, Brown Street, Glasgow G2 8EX Scotland with all the paperwork.
Searches take several months to complete.

Kind regards,
Alan
Reply from: Alan Greveson
Date: Sunday 12th May 2013 at 10:44 PM

It was the application forms, not the medals, that were available at Post Offices. My sentence construction was faulty.
Reply from: Bella
Date: Monday 13th May 2013 at 6:47 AM

Dear Alan,

Many thanks for all information. I actually have my Father,s medals. In order to find out his records from MOD will these still be available to find without his Service No.? He was Quarter Master Sgnt. Royal Engineers.

Regards

Bella
Reply from: Alan Greveson
Date: Monday 13th May 2013 at 11:25 AM

Dear Bella,
Providing you have his date of birth instead of a service number there should be no problem.
Kind regards,
Alan
Reply from: Bella
Date: Monday 13th May 2013 at 12:57 PM

Many thanks Alan

Bella


Posted by: John Grace
Location: Belfast Northern Ireland
Date: Saturday 11th May 2013 at 7:26 PM
Dear Alan
I'm hoping you can shed some light on the following , I am trying to research the following soldier of whom I have a photograph , He appears to be of rank , what makes me say that is he has two stripes on the cuffs of his tunic and I can clearly identify he belongs to the Royal Inniskilling Fusiliers.
The photograph I have is in Postcard Format and is addressed to
S MORRISON
61 SOUTHPORT STREET
BELFAST
IRELAND
Accompanying the photograph/postcard is a Prayer Book and within is the following -
T HAWKES
83 COMPANY AMPC
9 SECTION
B.E.F.
FRANCE
I would be grateful for any information at all no matter how small , many thanks in advance.

John Grace
Belfast
Reply from: Alan Greveson
Date: Saturday 11th May 2013 at 9:28 PM

Dear John,
The prayer book appears to date from the Second World War, as 83 Company AMPC was a company of the Auxiliary Military Pioneer Corps of the British Expeditionary Force in France in 1940. Records for men who served in the Second World War are not in the public domain and I do not research that war.
Two stripes on the cuff of a tunic do not indicate rank. Two inverted chevrons on the lower left sleeve indicated 6 years' good conduct. From 1944, small gold vertical wound stripes were worn on the lower left sleeve. Red wound stripes could be worn for wounds received in previous conflicts.
Kind regards,
Alan


Posted by: Mary Kibble
Location: Alnwick
Date: Saturday 11th May 2013 at 10:56 AM
I am researching James Pratt Roxby b. 1894/5 in Whittingham Northumberland. All I can find out about him is that he was a gunner with the Royal Garrison Artillery (Forth RGA (TF)) Battalion 213 siege battery, service no. 344251. He was killed in action on 19th December 1917 and is commemorated at the Menin Road South Military Cemetery near Ypres but his service record seems to no longer exist. I would be grateful for any help you can give. Thanks in advance. Mary Kibble.
Reply from: Alan Greveson
Date: Saturday 11th May 2013 at 6:17 PM

Dear Mary,
As there is no surviving service record for James Roxby it is not possible to suggest his wartime service in detail. His regimental number, 344251, was within a series of numbers allotted to the Forth (City of Edinburgh) Fortress Royal Garrison Artillery, early in 1917. The battery was part of the pre-war Scottish coastal defences manned by the Territorial Army, also known as the Territorial Force (T.F). Longer-serving men would have had four-digit regimental numbers which were originally used for the T.F. soldiers before being allotted new six-digit numbers early in 1917 when the Territorials were all re-numbered. "Soldiers Died in the Great War" (HMSO 1921) recorded James Pratt Roxby was born at Whittingham in Northumberland and joined the army at Alnwick, the nearest town. He was killed in action on 19th December 1917 in France and Flanders. The Commonwealth War Graves Commission Debt of Honour recorded that he was serving in 213 Siege Battery Royal Garrison Artillery on the day he died. 213 Siege Battery RGA went to France in late December 1916 or January 1917.
An Army medal rolls index card recorded that James P Roxby qualified for the British War Medal and the Victory Medal. As he did not qualify for the 1914-15 for service overseas before December 31st 1915, he did not see service overseas until some date after January 1st 1916. The medal index card was supposed to record a man's details as they were when he first went abroad. James's card recorded only a six-digit number 344251, indicating he first served overseas after that number had been allotted, early in 1917.
Without a service record it is not possible to state when he was enlisted or conscripted; where he trained; when he went abroad or whether he was transferred between units. From the available evidence, it can be stated that he died on December 19th 1917 while serving with 213 Siege Battery RGA, which had been in France for a year. It is not known whether he went to France with that Battery or whether he joined it at a later date as part of a draft of reinforcements. There is evidence from other soldiers' records that some members of the Forth RGA served overseas while others did not. It is possible that when 213 Siege Battery was raised it was raised from men who had trained at Edinburgh with the Forth RGA. The 213 Battery RGA war diary is held at the National Archives at Kew in catalogue reference WO 95/541 "213 Siege Battery Royal Garrison Artillery 1917 1st Feb. – 31st Dec." Note the diary began in February 1917 indicating that may have been when they first went to war. The medal index cards refer to Army medal rolls which are also held at the National Archives. The roll entry for James P. Roxby is on medal roll (TF) RGA/114B page 1417. The roll is National Archives Catalogue reference WO 329/264. That entry might state with which battery James was serving when he entered France. It could have a less helpful entry such as "base details", indicating he may have been part of a draft of reinforcements sent to 213 Battery from a detail of reinforcements held at a base on the coast of France. You would need to visit Kew to see the roll and the diary.
James is buried in a marked grave in plot 3, row O, grave 2 at Menin Road South Military Cemetery. The cemetery was used by Field Ambulances until the summer of 1918. The cemetery was increased after the Armistice when burials were moved from isolated positions on the battlefields to the east and another Menin Road cemetery which had been on the opposite side of the road.
213 Siege Battery RGA was allocated to the Fifth Army in the Ypres sector in 1917. The British Fifth Army was designated as such in October 1916 under the command of Sir Hubert Gough. In 1917 it fought in The Battle of Arras (1917) and the Third Battle of Ypres (Passchendaele) (1917). By December 1917, the fighting had been reduced to the routine of winter trench warfare, with frequent exchanges of artillery fire along the Menin Road which was a notorious part of the sector.

James Pratt Roxby was 22 when he died. His birth was registered in Northumberland in the first three months of 1895. He was the son of Jonathan James Roxby, known as James, and his wife Elizabeth (nee Pratt) who had both worked in domestic service. Elizabeth Pratt had married James Roxby (Jonathan James Roxby) at Alnwick district early in 1893. In the 1911 census James Pratt Roxby was recorded living with his married mother as her only surviving child (a child had died in infancy). He was recorded as a 16 year old brewery office boy. The address was "Mr Jas. Roxby, Dunstantboro' Terrace, Christon Bank, Embleton, Northumberland. His father, Jas, or James, Roxby was recorded elsewhere as a valet to Alexander Browne (junior). In 1901 James junior was recorded as the 6 year old son of Elizabeth Roxby who was the housekeeper-in-charge with an address as Callaly Castle, which was nine miles West of Alnwick. Callaly Castle had been bought in 1877 by Alexander Henry Browne, a Justice of the Peace and Captain in the Northumberland Light Infantry Militia. James Roxby senior appears to have been the valet (1901) and then butler (1911) to Alexander Henry Browne's son, Alexander, who lived at Whalton House, Whalton, in 1901 and then at Lorbottle Hall, Whittingham, in 1911. Alexander Browne had been born on March 29th 1871 the son of Alexander H. Browne and his wife Mary. Alexander junior was sent to preparatory school at St Michael's at Eton, later known as "Hawtrey's". He was educated at Eton College, Windsor. His 21st Birthday was celebrated in magnificent style at Callaly in 1892 with fireworks, an arch reading: "Long Live the Heir of Callaly", a special train and dinner for 150 workmen and a mile and a half of illuminated lanterns. He later held a commission as a Major in the 3rd Battalion Northumberland Fusiliers, which was his father's old battalion which had been re-named in 1881. For the Brownes of Callaly Castle see page nine etc. of:
http://www.alnandbreamishlhs.org.uk/uploads/images/pdfs/R%26R%200605.pdf

Jonathan James Roxby, butler, died on 1st August 1915 at Embleton. He had been born at Hunmanby, near Bridlington, Yorkshire, in late 1860. Elizabeth Roxby, who had lost her husband and only child, lived at 3 Dunstanburgh Terrace, Christon Bank, Embleton. She remained there until 1937 when she died at the age of 78 on 30th November 1937.
James Pratt Roxby is commemorated at the Scottish National War Memorial. See:
http://www.snwm.org/website/frames.html

He is named on the Forth RGA war memorial at St Giles High Kirk (cathedral), Edinburgh. See:
http://warmemscot.s4.bizhat.com/viewtopic.php?t=1097

There is a duplicate of the memorial in the TA Drill Hall at Kirkcaldy. See:
http://warmemscot.s4.bizhat.com/warmemscot-post-25552.html

Kind regards,
Alan
Reply from: Mary Kibble
Date: Sunday 12th May 2013 at 9:17 AM

Dear Alan,
Thank you so much for your very detailed response to my query. I am researching the names on the war memorial in Embleton of the men who served in the Great War, along with Terry Howells, who I know has also written to you. You have given us much fodder for the little booklet we hope to write. Thanks again.
Kind regards,
Mary


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