Alan Greveson's World War 1 Forum (Page 128)

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Posted by: Cathyk {Email left}
Location: Leeds
Date: Saturday 3rd March 2012 at 3:59 PM
My grandfather was 96033 Gnr Joe Lomas from Leeds. I have a letter from his commanding officer dated 23/1/19 giving a character reference. The officer signs himself JPB? Eastwood Capt RFA No 1section 14th D.A.C. B.E.F. Capt Eastwood said he had known Gnr Lomas since Sept 1916. I know this was the Royal Field Artillery but how do I find what Brigade this was? I would like to know whereabouts in France my grandfather served. I hope you can point me in the right direction.
Reply from: Alan Greveson
Date: Saturday 3rd March 2012 at 4:25 PM

Dear Cathyk,
14th DAC was the 14th Divisional Ammunition Column Royal Field Artillery. See:
http://www.1914-1918.net/14div.htm

See also:
http://www.1914-1918.net/whatartbrig.htm

The war diary is held at the National Archives at Kew in catalogue reference WO95/1888.

A medal index card for Joe Lomas showed he entered France on 20th May 1915 which matches the date of the 14th Division's deployment, so it seems likely he remained with 14th DAC until 1919. He qualified for the 1914-15 Star, the British War Medal and the Victory Medal.

Kind regards,
Alan
Reply from: Cathyk
Date: Sunday 4th March 2012 at 9:05 AM

Dear Alan

Thank you so much for your prompt reply and the information. Is it possible to determine which brigade my grandfather fought in? I see from an extract of 47th Brigade war diary on The Long,Long Trail that they left Southampton for France on 20 May 1915 which is the same date as on Joe's medal card. He would have joined up in Leeds.

Thank you again for your help

CathyK
Reply from: Alan Greveson
Date: Sunday 4th March 2012 at 1:27 PM

Dear Cathyk,
Joe Lomas did not serve in an artillery brigade as the 14th Divisional Ammunition Column (DAC) Royal Field Artillery was a separate unit in its own right. It would have had some 15 officers and 550 men who used 94 six-horse wagons to deliver and distribute ammunition to the fighting units of the Division.
The DAC was divided into a headquarters with four sections, the first three of which carried shells for the 18-pounder artillery guns and small arms ammunition for the infantry. Each section was responsible for providing the ammunition for one artillery brigade and one Infantry Brigade of three infantry battalions.
The principle was that troops at the front (artillery and infantry) never had to send back for ammunition. It was the duty of the troops in the rear to send ammunition forwards.
The ammunition was delivered by train to a railhead where a Divisional Ammunition Park was established. Reserves of ammunition were then stored at Ordnance Depots. The Divisional Ammunition Column had a rendezvous near the railhead. Ammunition was taken from the Ordnance Depots to a refilling point about two miles from the front-line which supplied the DAC sections. The DAC sections then took the ammunition forward in "general service wagons" each pulled by six draught horses and delivered it to the brigade transport rendezvous, about a mile from the front-line, for onward carrying to the front. During action, the DAC also stored ammunition at various points along the route to enable rapid re-supply as needed.
Kind regards,
Alan
Reply from: Cathyk
Date: Monday 5th March 2012 at 3:02 PM

Dear Alan

Thank you very much for the added information. Am I right in thinking that all the brigades in a division would serve in the same area and, therefore, the DAC would supply them all?
On Joe's medal card he is first listed as a driver ( looking after the horses as I understand) and then as a gunner. Presumably this meant he changed his role. His daughter,my mother, has a vague recollection of him telling her that he used to peel the potatoes so I assume he must have been involved with the catering. Would a gunner have this kind of role?

Thank you again for your help.

CathyK
Reply from: Alan Greveson
Date: Monday 5th March 2012 at 5:41 PM

Dear Cathyk,
The DAC would supply all the Artillery brigades of the division and the brigades would have remained in the divisional area, being deployed as required. The drivers of the DAC would need to know where the guns were actually situated so they could meet up with the brigade ammunition columns. Knowing the routes by night and day and in all weathers was as important as being able to control horses when under shell-fire. Each pair of horses had a driver. There were three drivers to a team of six horses pulling a general service wagon; the drivers were known as lead (front), centre and wheel.
Drivers and gunners were both ranks of private soldiers in the Royal Artillery, and both were paid the same. All private soldiers were known as gunners and were trained how to handle the guns themselves, although not every gunner would be good at handling horses. The title "driver" and "gunner" indicated an ability to fulfil the role even if his actual employment did not change. The tradition of the Royal Artillery was that every last man could fire a gun and a gun never stopped firing even if just one man was left even if he were the cook.
Peeling potatoes was a "fatigue" duty which any soldier could find himself doing. It did not necessarily indicate he was a permanent cook.
Kind regards,
Alan
Reply from: Cathyk
Date: Monday 5th March 2012 at 10:07 PM

Alan

Thank you for all the information you have given me. I'm so glad I found this site

Best Wishes

CathyK
Posted by: Becca {Email left}
Location: E Yorks
Date: Saturday 3rd March 2012 at 12:26 PM
Hello again Alan,
I am still endeavouring to fill in gaps of my own family, and have found someone that I am puzzled over, and wonder if you could give me more clarification as to who he is.

He is Pvt. E Pottage of the The East Yorkshire Regiment No 4345083. He was a POW No 8802 in Camp No 20B
He was in Stalag Marienburg The record office was : Infantry and Army Educational Corps Record

With many thanks for your help

Kind regards

Becca
Reply from: Alan Greveson
Date: Saturday 3rd March 2012 at 4:26 PM

Dear Becca,
It is not possible to be certain about E Pottage without applying to the Ministry of Defence for his service records. However, he appears to be Edgar Pottage and might have been born on 4th August 1918 to Samuel Pottage (1872 -1931). See:
http://www.east-yorkshire-regiment.co.uk/db/troops/selector.php?surname=pottage&forename=&submit=Begin+Search

The MoD will release certain amounts of information about a deceased person depending on whether you are next of kin or not. You can apply using the forms for next of kin, or with permission of next of kin, or as a general enquirer. See:

http://www.veterans-uk.info/service_records/service_records.html

You will need proof of death; date of birth or service number; next of kin's permission (unless you are the direct next of kin); a cheque and completed forms Part 1 and 2. The next of kin form (Part 1) is for completion by the next of kin of deceased service personnel (or enquirers with the consent of next of kin). Look for "Service records publications" under "Related pages" and follow the instructions. The Part 2 form is entitled: "Request forms for service personnel Army" found under "Related Pages". Otherwise use a general enquirer's form. A cheque for GBP 30 should be made payable to "The MoD Accounting Officer" and sent to Army Personnel Centre Secretariat, Disclosures 2, Mail Point 515, Kentigern House, 65, Brown Street, Glasgow G2 8EX Scotland with all the paperwork.

Kind regards,
Alan
Reply from: Becca
Date: Saturday 3rd March 2012 at 6:58 PM

Thank you Alan once again for your prompt reply. You have confirmed that he is not the E Pottage that I am looking for.

Kind regards

Becca
Posted by: Angela {Email left}
Location: Newton Abbot
Date: Wednesday 29th February 2012 at 6:03 PM
Hello again Alan,
I have recently discovered another great uncle who served in ww1 but again no sign of a service record.
He is Frederick Charles Roper Reg No 61644 served in 35 bde RFA Killed in Action 04 06 1917, memorial at Faubourg D'amiens cemetary, Arras.
Could you possibly shed some light on his involvement in the war. Also there are, what appears to me, to be more roll numbers at the bottom of his medal card and a note in the correspondence part about disposal of medal. Could you enlighten me on what these mean please.
Eternally Grateful
Kind Regards
Angela
Reply from: Alan Greveson
Date: Wednesday 29th February 2012 at 8:33 PM

Dear Angela,
Frederick Charles Roper was probably a pre-war regular army soldier as he served in XXXV Brigade Royal Field Artillery which was part of the regular army. He qualified for the 1914 Star with Mons clasp, the British War Medal, and the Victory Medal. He went to France with the 7th Division on 6th October 1914. The engagements of the 7th Division are shown at:
http://www.1914-1918.net/7div.htm

When he was killed on 4th June 1917, the CWGC recorded he was with VI Corps Headquarters, so it is not possible to say where he was or what he was doing. The 7th Division was not with VI Corps, so he had probably been attached or transferred at some stage. The Corps was involved with the Arras offensive of 1917.
His medal card showed two administrative references (E probably stood for Enquiry) to correspondence from the soldier's record office requesting disposal of his medals which indicated that the medals had been returned by the GPO as not deliverable. Medals were sent recorded delivery to the man's last address or his family's last address. The British War and Victory medals were not instigated until after the Armistice and were sent out by post in 1920/21, so the family may have received only the 1914 Star which was instigated in 1917. The Mon clasp was instigated in 1919. The undelivered medals would have been held for a while by the record office before being returned to the Army Medal Office. The correspondence would have been seeking permission to return the medals to the Medal Office for them to be forwarded to the mint at Woolwich for melting down.

Kind regards,
Alan
Reply from: Angela
Date: Wednesday 29th February 2012 at 8:47 PM

Thank you again for your help, the more I search my family the more I find were in the Army or Navy. Your help is greatly appreciated.

A big Thank You Again
Kind Regards
Angela
Posted by: Tim Jones {Email left}
Location: West Bromwich
Date: Wednesday 29th February 2012 at 4:20 PM
Hi

Im currently researching the story of a plane crash that happened during world war two. The area is Thimblemill in the town of Smethwick near Birmingham. The report im researching is linked to that of a German soldier who is said to have ejected from his plane before it crashed, Reprots i have heard mention he may have landed near Thimbelmill Baths (now know as smethwick swimming centre) If there is any information you may have on this and also where he may have been taken afterwards that would be greatful.

Kind regards

Tim Jones
Posted by: Nkj {Email left}
Location: Birmingham
Date: Tuesday 28th February 2012 at 7:54 PM
Hi,

I am trying to track my parternal great grandfather. The little information I have on him comes from the back of a Bible he owned which says:
Pt. William Johnson
Reg No 61112
C Company
1st Battalion South Staffs
Tanglin Barracks
Singapore
SS

Dated December 1919.

I am having no luck tracking his service records and any help would be appreciated.

Many thanks
Reply from: Alan Greveson
Date: Tuesday 28th February 2012 at 10:02 PM

Dear Nkj
There are no obvious military records for William Johnson. As the name was very common, you would need to know his date and place of birth and whether William was a first or middle name to search all the records comprehensively. As he served in a regular army battalion which was garrisoned at Singapore, Burma, India and Sudan until 1929, he may have been a post-war regular soldier who had not served in conflict in the First World War. In that case his service record may still be held by the UK Ministry of Defence.
The MoD will release certain amounts of information about a deceased person depending on whether you are next of kin or not. You can apply using the forms for next of kin, or with permission of next of kin, or as a general enquirer. See:

http://www.veterans-uk.info/service_records/service_records.html

You will need proof of death; date of birth or service number; next of kin's permission (unless you are the direct next of kin); a cheque and completed forms Part 1 and 2. The next of kin form (Part 1) is for completion by the next of kin of deceased service personnel (or enquirers with the consent of next of kin). Look for "Service records publications" under "Related pages" and follow the instructions. The Part 2 form is entitled: "Request forms for service personnel Army" found under "Related Pages". Otherwise use a general enquirer's form. A cheque for GBP 30 should be made payable to "The MoD Accounting Officer" and sent to Army Personnel Centre Secretariat, Disclosures 2, Mail Point 515, Kentigern House, 65, Brown Street, Glasgow G2 8EX Scotland with all the paperwork.

Kind Regards,
Alan
Posted by: Vic Cooper {Email left}
Location: Port Perry On Canada
Date: Tuesday 28th February 2012 at 7:15 PM
DEAR ALAN . YOU HELPED TREMENDOUSLY FINDING OUT ABOUT MY GRANDFATHER ENOCH COOPER.BORN TO WILLIAM H COOPER AND HANNAH COOPER. ON 8TH SEPT 1877. AT STOCKTON ON THE TEES.CAN YOU TELL ME HOW TO GO ABOUT SEARCHING IF HE HAD ANY SIBLINGS.WE DON'T KNOW HOW TO START. THANKS MUCH VIC
Reply from: Alan Greveson
Date: Tuesday 28th February 2012 at 9:34 PM

Dear Vic,
The starting point is to study the family through the ten-yearly national censuses which are available in the UK only up to 1911. These would show Enoch's parents and their children at ten yearly intervals, but would not record any children who were born and subsequently died between census years. Individuals often left home, so searches need to be made for the parents in each census. For any births after the last census, from 1912, you can search the English birth indexes produced by the England and Wales General Register Office to search for births of children by the father's surname and the mother's maiden name.
Subscription to a family history website, such as Findmypast.co.uk or Ancestry.com would be helpful but there are free search sites such as Free BMD at
freebmd.org.uk
You local library may provide free access to Ancestry or to the Familysearch website, which is comprehensive but not exhaustive.
The family lived in Durham for some time and there is an excellent website
durhamrecordsonline.com
which may provide baptism, marriage and death details for which you would need to buy credits.

In 1891, William and Hannah Cooper had three daughters and two sons: Henrietta, born about 1876, West Hartlepool; Enoch, born about 1878, Stockton; Ada, born about 1880, West Hartlepool; Harriett, born about 1886, West Hartlepool and John W. born about 1890, West Hartlepool. Most birth years recorded in censuses are a year out, because each census was taken at the start of April, so there were another nine months of the year in which to celebrate an additional birthday.

The 1881 England census is free to search at Familysearch or Findmypast.co.uk. It shows no change and the 1901 census also shows no change. So, perhaps there were five children in all.

Finding the marriage of William Cooper to a Hannah will be difficult as his name occurs frequently and while he came from Scarborough in Yorkshire, Hannah came from Derbyshire, so it is not possible to state where the marriage took place.

Kind regards,
Alan
Reply from: Vic Cooper
Date: Tuesday 28th February 2012 at 10:26 PM

ONCE AGAIN YOU WERE AMAZING. WE WILL GO FOR A TREE NOW . THANKS MUCH VIC
Posted by: Mthomson
Location: Clayton Le Moors
Date: Monday 27th February 2012 at 1:06 PM
I am trying to build up a picture of my grand fathers life. His name was Michael McGriskin, born in Ireland in September 1873. During the First World War he served in the Royal Garrison Artillery as a gunner, Regiment Number 3432, he was also a private in the Army Ordinance Corps, regiment number 47026 and was a driver in the Army Service Corps Regiment number ET/49368.
I wonder if you could possibly add to my knowledge and find any information that could tell me a little about his service?
Thank you
Reply from: Alan Greveson
Date: Monday 27th February 2012 at 3:54 PM

Dear MThomson,
No individual service record has survived for Michael McGriskin. An army medal rolls index card showed he first served with the Royal Garrison Artillery and went to France on 23 April 1915. The card recorded that his second unit was as a driver with the Army Service Corps with the regimental number ET49368.
The ET prefix was designated at the end of the war for soldiers who volunteered to serve with the Army of Occupation on the Rhine for an additional year (E). The T prefix stood for horse transport. Therefore, it seems likely he served with the RGA until the Armistice; joined the ASC as a horse driver and later transferred to the Army Ordnance Corps.
His qualification for the 1914-15 Star was included on the medal roll numbered RASC/1C15 page 2518. This roll is held at the National Archives at Kew, London, in Catalogue reference WO 329/2903 "Royal Army Service Corps other ranks: medal rolls. RASC/1C14-1C17. Pages 2311C-2640C. 1914-15 Star".
You could visit Kew or pay for a researcher to look up the roll entry. Each soldier had a one line entry on the roll which may or may not have recorded the unit with which he went to France. See:
http://www.nationalarchives.gov.uk/records/paid_research.htm

For more on the Royal Garrison Artillery, see the artillery pages at Chris Baker's website:
http://www.1914-1918.net/cra.htm

Kind regards,
Alan
Posted by: Kez Smith {Email left}
Location: Sydney Australia
Date: Monday 27th February 2012 at 8:40 AM
Hello Alan,
Can you help my friend Isobel Robson in regard to her Dad. His name was Peter Gardner Christie born Dundee Scotland, born 1901.He was in the Royal Naval Volunteer reserve.Official no. ESD/295 He was mobilised 22nd October1939-17th September 1945 The ships he served on were Victory, Suffolk, King George V, and Hornet. Isobel thinks he had been torpedoed?

Any information would be appreciated, or any direction!

Many thanks Kez
Reply from: Alan Greveson
Date: Monday 27th February 2012 at 1:29 PM

Dear Kez,
Records from the Second World War are still held by the Ministry of Defence. The MoD will release certain amounts of information about a deceased person depending on whether you are next of kin or not. You can apply using the forms for next of kin, or with permission of next of kin, or as a general enquirer. See:

http://www.veterans-uk.info/service_records/service_records.html

You will need proof of death; date of birth or service number; next of kin's permission (unless you are the direct next of kin); a cheque and completed forms Part 1 and 2. The next of kin form (Part 1) is for completion by the next of kin of deceased service personnel (or enquirers with the consent of next of kin). Look for "Service records publications" under "Related pages" and follow the instructions. The Part 2 form is entitled: "Request forms for service personnel Navy" found under "Related Pages". Otherwise use a general enquirer's form. A cheque for GBP 30 should be made payable to "The MoD Accounting Officer" and sent to: RN Disclosure Cell, Room 48, West Battery, Whale Island,
Portsmouth PO2 8DX.

HMS Victory and Hornet were base stations at Portsmouth. You would need to know dates for when Peter Christie served on individual ships. For HMS Suffolk see:

http://www.flickr.com/photos/16118167@N04/6791197519/
and HMS King George V, see:

http://www.naval-history.net/xGM-Chrono-01BB-KGV.htm

Kind regards,
Alan
Reply from: Kez
Date: Tuesday 28th February 2012 at 8:44 AM

Hi Alan, once again many thanks for the information you have given me, I will pass it onto my friend!

Cheers Kerrie
Posted by: Jlc
Location: Bucks
Date: Sunday 26th February 2012 at 9:09 PM
Hi,

My Great Grandfather 's brother, Richard Brocklehurst, served with the 9th Btn Essex Regiment during WW1. I would love to know more about his service history. I know that he died on 10 August 1918 and that his grave is at the Beacon Cemetary, Sailly-Laurette, France. Thank you.
Reply from: Alan Greveson
Date: Monday 27th February 2012 at 1:28 PM

Dear Jlc,
No individual service record has survived for Richard Brocklehurst so it is not possible to suggest his wartime service.
An army medal rolls index card recorded that he first entered a theatre of war with the 1st Battalion Essex Regiment on 26th September 1915 in the Balkans. The 1st Bn Essex Regiment had been at Gallipoli since April 1915, therefore Richard was part of a draft of reinforcements. The 1st Bn Essex regiment was withdrawn from Gallipoli and went to Egypt in January 1916. They then moved to France on 16th March 1916.
When Richard was killed on August 10th 1918 he was recorded as being with the 9th Battalion Essex Regiment. It is not possible to say when he was posted from one battalion to another. "Soldiers Died in the Great War" (HMSO 1921) recorded he had originally enlisted in the Royal Artillery with the regimental number 80261.
The 9th Battalion Essex regiment was fighting with the 35th Infantry Brigade with the 12th Division in August 1918. During the Battle of Albert 1918 the 9th Battalion was consolidating a line west of Morlancourt to the River Ancre. On 8 August, the first day of the Battle of Amiens, Sailly-Laurette and the road to Morlancourt were taken by the British. By the evening of the 10th August the Division had advanced two miles.

Kind regards,
Alan
Reply from: Jlc
Date: Tuesday 28th February 2012 at 10:16 PM

Much appreciated, thank you.
Posted by: Karl Howard {Email left}
Location: Jersey
Date: Sunday 26th February 2012 at 8:15 PM
Can anyone help...I am trying to piece together my family tree, and have come across some information about my Great Great Grandfather, his name is Christopher Samuel Sweet ( Sweetapple)...he was in the Oxford and Bucks Light Infantry, he was an Lance Sergeant in 1915, latter became a Sergeant in 1918, his regimental No. 10339 or 10330.

We believe he joined up in 1904 onwards, as it took around 8 years to attain his rank in 1915, for us we would like to know, where he served in the period from 1904 - 1918, and for us, just where he may have come from, as he was not on any census in 1891, 1901 or 1911...leads us to believe he may have come from the Flemish part of Belgium, Sweetapple being a strong Jewish surname, maybe he left there to get to England...his profession in 1915 with the army is believed to be that of Photographer / Traveller...

If anyone can help me out on who he was etc, or a place where I might get more concrete details on my ancestor, then I would be most obliged for you r kind help.

Many thanks

Karl Howard
Reply from: Alan Greveson
Date: Monday 27th February 2012 at 12:12 AM

Dear Karl,
The family of Christopher Samuel Sweetapple can be traced through the all the English census and baptism records from Christopher Samuel Sweet's death in 1966 to his great grandfather, William Sweetapple, born in about 1784 at West Harnham in Wiltshire.
The name Sweetapple is an Anglicised version of Sussapfel or Zisapel which was an Ashkenazic Jewish name. In the 18th century the Jews were without a nation and the vast majority lived in Poland or Russia. From the 1790s many were forced to live in the Russian "Pale of Settlement" when Poland was divided. Jews were allowed to settle again in England from 1656 which encouraged migration by Ashkenazi Jews of central European origin, from Germany and Poland.

Christopher Samuel Sweetapple appears in the census as C.S. Sweetapple in 1911; Samuel in 1901; and Christopher S. in 1891; all under the name Sweetapple. His father can be traced as Jospeh Sweetapple born 1845 and his grandfather as William Sweetapple baptised 3 April 1821, the son of William and Frances who married in 1819. William senior was born about 1781 (both are Wm Sweetapple in the 1841 census). William Sweetapple appears to have been born in 1784 and married Frances Blake in 1819 in Wiltshire.

A medal rolls index card for Christopher S. Sweet showed that he served with the Oxford and Buckinghamshire Light Infantry with the regimental number 10330. This was a typical wartime service number of five digits. The card recorded his rank on first entering a theatre of war as a lance-serjeant. By the end of the war he had attained the rank of serjeant. The card showed he qualified for the post-war British War Medal and Victory Medal by serving with the 8th Battalion Ox and Bucks.
He qualified for the 1914-15 Star by departing for a theatre of war (1 France) on 18th September 1915. No individual service record appears to have serviced for him.

While it might have taken a peacetime regular army soldier some years to attain the rank of lance-serjeant, during the war promotion to the NCOs' ranks in the battalions raised for wartime service could be made on the spot. Many of the Kitchener's Army battalions simply promoted men who had been in the Boy Scouts; a school Cadet Force or wore a tie to work. As they were raising new battalions from a civilian workforce they did not have the time or the opportunity to train or select. Those who demonstrated some potential were promoted.

In 1911, Christopher Samuel Sweetapple was a "collector" for a coal merchant, living in London, probably collecting the coal merchant's cash. His army number was a typical five-digit wartime only service number and his battalion was the 8th Battalion Ox and Bucks which was raised in October 1914 at Oxford and trained at Codford. On 25th January 1915 it became the Pioneer Battalion for the 26th Division and landed at Le Havre on 19 September 1915. Therefore, it seems probable that Christopher S Sweet served with the 8th Battalion throughout the war because his date of entry matches that of the 8th Battalion. The 8th Battalion moved to Salonika in November 1915 and remained in Macedonia for the duration of the war. For the history of the 26th Division see:
http://www.1914-1918.net/26div.htm

The war diary of the 8th Battalion is held at the National Archives in catalogue reference WO 95/4866.
During the war, and afterwards, Christopher S Sweet appeared to be named Sweet and he appears to have married twice: Mabel Lavinia Moss in 1926 and Florence K Cobb in 1943. He lived at Fulham and appears to have died 1966.

Kind regards,
Alan
Reply from: Alan Greveson
Date: Monday 27th February 2012 at 12:17 AM

At the end of paragraph three "No individual service record appears to have serviced for him. " should read ... has survived for him.

Alan
Reply from: Karl Howard
Date: Monday 27th February 2012 at 8:55 AM

Dear Alan, words fail me, I cannot thank you enough for all this incredible and very accurate information, I know when I convey this information to my parents, they will be both amazed and very proud, it is amazing just how much information you have provided to me, and I thank you so very much.

I had information that Christopher was in the army in 1915, and felt he may have enlisted earlier, and from what you have told me, it seems that he rose in the ranks as a result of the heavy casualties given at the time, I am so very proud of his actions, that he did his bit along with the other brave soldiers, in a way it gives me some pride that my ancestor was one of the first to join up, and thankfully one of the few to survive.

I really appreciate your very quick response and your help, this will really fill in some very blank areas.

Thanks again.

Karl Howard
Reply from: Martin Hagger
Date: Monday 26th January 2015 at 2:30 PM

Hello Karl,

We are not related, but I am hoping you can help with the fate of a distant
Pracy cousin, Florence Kathleen Cobb, daughter of Florence Ellen Pracy. I
know that Florence K was alive in 1966, because she was granted
administration of the estate of her husband, Christopher Samuel Sweet. But
I don't know what became her after that, nor when/where she died. Do you
know?

I am, of course, curious about the families of Florence K's Rooke and Sweet husbands, but I am keen to avoid taking up too much of your time. Judging by your surname, you probably descend from Alice P Sweet, daughter of C S Sweet's first wife. Is this correct?

Regards,
Martin Hagger
Goodmayes, Ilford, Essex
Reply from: Martin Hagger
Date: Monday 26th January 2015 at 10:47 PM

Hello Karl,
I am not sure if you received my earlier message, re Florence Kathleen Sweet
nee Cobb, but can you use the "Contact Editor" link (bottom of each page) to
grant permission for your email address to be released to me, please?
Regards,
Martin Hagger

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