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Posted by: Paul Davies {Email left}
Location: Regina Sask
Date: Friday 29th March 2013 at 3:31 PM
Good Morning Mr. Greveson - can you give me a hand with Pte. W.H. Ebdon R.A.MC. - he only had one medal from WW1? and a kurdistan medal with clasp ?
Reply from: Paul Davies
Date: Friday 29th March 2013 at 3:33 PM

I'm such a silly - I forgot to give you his number is 79920
Reply from: Paul Davies
Date: Friday 29th March 2013 at 3:39 PM

The medal William received was a Victory medal - and a Government Service Medal ? with Kurdistan Clasp ? I must admit I'm very confused
Reply from: Alan Greveson
Date: Saturday 30th March 2013 at 10:40 AM

Dear Paul,
William Henry Ebdon was born at Cardiff in November 1896. He was a quarry labourer and at the age of 19 he enlisted in the Royal Army Medical Corps on 20th November 1915 with the regimental number 79920. He served overseas for a short time in 1916 when he was wounded and returned to the UK for treatment to a gunshot wound which healed in October 1916. He qualified for the British War Medal and the Victory Medal. After the First World War he continued to serve in the RAMC with the Army number 7254893 and took part in the Kurdistan Operation of 1923 for which he qualified for the General Service Medal. The Kurdistan Operation was a small force which quelled dissent amongst Kurdish people in the North of the newly created British Mandate of Iraq. Iraq achieved independence in 1932. William Ebdon served with 31st Company RAMC which was based in India in the 1920s and was at one stage based at Deolali (1925) and then Lahore (1928). His service record would be held by the UK Ministry of Defence and is not in the public domain.
Kind regards,
Alan
Posted by: Bella {No contact email}
Location: Esher
Date: Sunday 24th March 2013 at 7:56 PM
Dear Alan,
Can you help?

Alice Mabel Johnson, born Otford, Kent about 1877, parents James and Jane Johnson. Given to understand she married a George, Arthur Clarke 1908, Suffolk? Trying to establish any information from that marriage, children, deaths etc.

Would be extremely grateful if you can assist.

Hope you are keeping well, despite this deplorable weather.

Regards, Bella
Reply from: Alan Greveson
Date: Monday 25th March 2013 at 3:08 PM

Dear Bella,
You would need to establish accurate information for Alice Johnson and any reputed husband to identify her positively. Do not rely on a middle name identifying her.
Otford in Kent was in the Sevenoaks registration district. The birth of an Alice Mabel Johnson was registered at Sevenoaks in Jan-Feb-Mar 1879 (GRO Births, Sevenoaks, Kent 1879 Q1, Vol 2A page 589). In the 1881 census she was recorded born Sevenoaks, 1879, living in Otford with her parents. In the 1891 census she was recorded with her parents at Otford as being born at Great Ness in 1879. In the 1901 census an Alice Johnson, born Otford, Kent, in 1879, was a domestic cook for Henry W Fitz G Powell, surgeon, in Paddington, London.
Having checked by name; county; parish and year of birth, there is no obvious entry for her in the 1911 census but as explained below, she was probably not married to George Clarke.
After the 1901 census entry specific information about her death, marriage or emigration would be required to identify her.
The actual certificate for the presumed marriage in 1908 would have to be purchased to provide the details for George Alfred Clarke (GRO Marriages, Risbridge, Suffolk, 1908 Q4, Vol 4A, page 1581).
However, there was an Alice Mabel Johnson born at Risbridge, Suffolk in Jan-Mar 1890 who would have been 18 in 1908. Marriages usually took place in the bride's parish of residence.
It is possible to match an Alice born in Risbridge, Suffolk in 1890 with a George Clarke living in the Risbridge district in the 1911 census, so this was probably a different Alice Mabel Johnson.
As not all records state both forenames, and often used initials (e.g. Alice M.) it would be necessary to search through all deaths, marriages and emigration records in the name of Alice Johnson after 1901in England, Scotland, Wales and Ireland.
Kind regards,
Alan
Reply from: Bella
Date: Monday 25th March 2013 at 6:16 PM

Dear Alan,

Many thanks for your time and effort.

Will plough on.

Happy Easter.

Bella

Posted by: Amy {No contact email}
Location: Bradford
Date: Sunday 24th March 2013 at 2:20 PM
An elderly neigbour is looking for information about his maternal grandfather, a man called William Liversedge, who survived WW1 but was severely wounded and lost a leg.Not a great deal is known about William that helps us find him, but he lived and worked around Denaby Main and Castleford in Yorkshire and perhaps enlisted from there. He got married to Martha Holdsworth at Doncaster the month after war broke out, so this might have meant that he was ready to go then.
If there is any information at all out there about William, it would be just wonderful for my neighbour, although I know we don't have much to go on. Thank you if anyone can help.
Reply from: Alan Greveson
Date: Sunday 24th March 2013 at 6:48 PM

Dear Amy,
Very few surviving records from the First World War provide biographical information to identify a soldier, so it is not possible to positively identify a man by his name only.
There were nine men named William Liversedge who served overseas in the Great War and a tenth man who did not serve overseas. There was one man named W. Liversedge, who appears to have been Wilfred. There were also a number of men named William Liversidge.
Of the nine who served abroad one was identified as living at Castleford but he was single in 1916 in listed his mother as his next of kin. An additional four men could be positively eliminated on the grounds they lived in London, Liverpool, Leeds or died.
As William Liversedge lost a leg it is likely that he qualified for the Silver War Badge for being wounded. There were only two men named William Liversedge who qualified for the badge and one of them did not serve overseas. There were two called Liversidge.
There is no conclusive evidence but the one man named William Liversedge (or Liversidge) who served overseas and was awarded the Silver War Badge for wounds (and not for "sickness") was recorded as private William Liversedge, 51899, East Yorkshire Regiment who enlisted on 24 November 1915 and was discharged as no longer physically fit on 16th May 1919 (possibly after leaving hospital). His stated age was 31 in 1919 which meant he was born about 1888.
The 1911 census recorded one William Liversedge born at St Helen's in Lancashire in 1888 who was a yard labourer at a glass bottle works, living at 17 Glasshouse Row, Denaby Main, near Rotherham with his step-father who was Thomas Rockett, married to Mary Ellen (Liversedge) with five children, Clara, Fred, Jessie, Mary Ellen and Eva Rockett and William Liversedge, step-son.
William's birth was registered at St Helen's, Prescot, Lancashire, in 1887.
No individual service record has survived for William so it is not possible to state his war service. The best that can be deduced is that he most likely served with the East Yorkshire Regiment. He qualified for the British War Medal and the Victory Medal and was awarded the Silver War Badge.
Given the lack of evidence, it is a tentative identification.
The archives of the East Yorkshire Regiment are held by the Prince of Wales's Own Regiment of Yorkshire Museum in York. They do not have service records but they may be able to identify in which battalion he served. See:
http://www.pwo-yorkshire.museum/

Kind regards,
Alan
Reply from: Amy
Date: Monday 25th March 2013 at 12:38 PM

A very big thank you for researching this information for my neighbour, who is thrilled that a few clues have possibly been unearthed about his grandad. We shall make contact with the Yorkshire Museum and hope something might come out of that. Your helpful reply is really appreciated as he was getting nowhere until now
Posted by: Richard {Email left}
Location: Maidenhead
Date: Sunday 24th March 2013 at 11:21 AM
Hi Alan. I was given your name and this Forum by Kevin Myers.
I'm serching for details of my late father Christopher C Byrnes.
Christopher Columbus Byrnes, born 23 Dec 1888 in Lucan, Co Dublin, Ireland.

He enlisted in Royal Dublin Fusiliers (RDF) 23 Nov 1906 and served for 21 yrs as a full time soldier.
In 1922 , after Independence, he was transferred to the Leicestershire Regiment in England.
His Service Number in England was 7075094.
His Service Number in RDF was 9638
He went with the Expeditionary Force to France from May 1915 to April 1919.
Then in the Army of the Black Sea from Dec 1919 to Nov 1920, then to India until April 1922.
His photo appears in one of the Sergeants Mess in Multan, India in the book
"Crown & Company" page 144/145, the story of the 2nd Battalion RDF from 1911-1922.

However after exchange of info with the RDFA there is some doubt as to whether he was originally in the 1st Battalion
as there was an indication from earlier papers, now tragically lost, that he was also at Gallipoli.
Can you shed any light on this matter please?
Cheers Richard
Reply from: Alan Greveson
Date: Sunday 24th March 2013 at 6:21 PM

Dear Richard,
As Christopher Byrnes served after 1921 his service record will be held by the UK Ministry of Defence.
An Army medal rolls index card recorded that Serjeant Christr. Byrnes 9638 Royal Dublin Fusiliers qualified for the 1914-15 Star by first entering a theatre of war (2b) Balkans on 2nd May 1915. The date suggests he was part of a draft of reinforcements, because the 1st Battalion The Royal Dublin Fusiliers had landed at Helles, Gallipoli, on 25th April 1915. They suffered heavy casualties and on 30th April 1915 they amalgamated with the 1st Royal Munster Fusiliers until 19th May 1915 when they resumed their identity as 1st Bn RDF. The 1st Battalion left Gallipoli on January 1st 1916 and went to Egypt, sailing for France on 13th March 1916. They served in 16th Division with 48th Infantry Brigade.
On 14th April 1918, the 1st and 2nd Battalions RDF amalgamated and five days later the 2nd Battalion was reduced to administrative cadre and the 1st Battalion was reconstituted with the remainder of the 2nd Battalion. On 26th April 1918, the 1st Battalion RDF moved to 86th Brigade in the 29th Division. The 1st Battalion ended the war at St Genois in Belgium.
On 6th June 1918, the 2nd Battalion was reconstituted from the 7th Battalion which had been raised for wartime service and which was then reduced to cadre strength. The reconstituted 2nd Battalion served with 149th Brigade in the 50th Division and ended the war at Dourlers in France.
Following the Armistice with the Ottoman Empire on 30th October 1918, Britain secured Constantinople (Istanbul) and the Straits forming the sea route to the Black Sea, giving a Southern access to Russia. The Allies sent troops to the Ottoman ports on the Black Sea as that part of the Ottoman Empire rallied against the occupying Allies in the rise of Turkish nationalism (1919-1923). In 1919, Britain sought to influence the struggle in the Caucasus against the red Bolshevist Russians by the non-communist White Russians. Operations in South Russia and the Black Sea involved the 2nd Battalion RDF serving with 27th Division.
The defeat of the Ottoman forces allowed a brief period of Transcaucasian independence with European recognition of the republics of Georgia, Azerbaijan and Armenia. The latter was to gain seven eastern provinces from the Turks. The anti-Bolshevist forces were formed into "The Military Forces of Southern Russia" under General Anton Denikin, that became known as the "Volunteer Army" and which was supported by Britain. Early in 1919 Gen Denekin's Volunteers undertook an offensive against the newly-formed Red Army. The occupation of Armenia gave the British control of Batum, and with it the sea route to Constantinople and the rest of the world. Batum was the terminus of the Trans-Caucasian Railway to Baku, which was the location of oil wells. The Red Army massed in size against the self-proclaimed independent states and it became politically unsound to further the British military cause in Russia.

The Ministry of Defence will release certain amounts of information about a deceased person depending on whether you are the direct next-of-kin, or not. You can apply for a search using the different application forms for next-of-kin, or with permission of next-of-kin, or as a general enquirer. See:
http://www.veterans-uk.info/service_records/service_records.html

Click on the link and then look for "Service records - requests for service records of deceased service personnel and home guard" in the left-hand column.
You will need proof of death (copy of death certificate); the soldier's date of birth or service number; and next-of-kin's signed permission (unless you are the direct next-of-kin), known as form Part 1. You then need a completed form Part 2 (search details), and cheque for payment. The next-of-kin form (Part 1) is for completion by the next-of-kin of deceased service personnel (or enquirers with the consent of next of kin). The Part 2 form is entitled: "Request forms for service personnel Army" A cheque for GBP 30 should be made payable to "The MOD Accounting Officer" and sent to Army Personnel Centre Secretariat, Disclosures 2, Mail Point 515, Kentigern House, 65, Brown Street, Glasgow G2 8EX Scotland with all the paperwork.
Kind regards,
Alan
Reply from: Richard
Date: Monday 25th March 2013 at 9:57 AM

What an excellent historian you are Alan!
Many, many thanks for your response and the details for further exploration on my part.
Long live the Buffs.
Cheers
Richard
Posted by: Jonboy {Email left}
Location: Harlow Essex England
Date: Saturday 23rd March 2013 at 3:12 PM
Hi Alan
Just to let you know my son Luke had a Tabletop sale of all his Rubbish in his bedroom (Hooray!) and raised £62 to be given to the British Legion,he came home so exited,
Jonboy
Reply from: Alan Greveson
Date: Saturday 23rd March 2013 at 7:19 PM

Hi Jonboy,
That's wonderful news. It is a very kind gesture to sell-off your possessions for the benefit of others. Thank Luke very much. He should feel very satisfied with a good day's work. When I was searching for your grandfather, I came across the My Heritage site and recognised it was your family so I guessed it was your site.
Alan
Reply from: Alan Greveson
Date: Thursday 4th April 2013 at 10:41 PM

Dear Jonboy,
You and Luke might be interested in the request from Alastair Macdonald on the forum to get in touch. He is a Reuters writer interested in people researching their family histories in connection with the First World War centenary next year. I have spoken with him and he is all above board.It struck me that Luke would have a story to tell.
Kind regards,
Alan
Reply from: Jonboy
Date: Friday 5th April 2013 at 11:20 AM

Hi Alan
Thanks for that we will look into it.
Jonboy
Posted by: Jonboy {Email left}
Location: Harlow Essex England
Date: Thursday 21st March 2013 at 4:51 PM
Hi Alan
I was 100% sure i had my Grandads WW1 details from you ages ago,but it appears not would you mind please looking him up please,in my late Fathers Diary it states he was born William George Nicholls in Brentford End Middlesex 1884,he served in the Royal Fuselliars,his No looks to be G/26319 it also says he was in the Royal Engineers Nos : 330521/WR/311604.I would dearly love to know what my Grandad did during his War years if you could please.
Kind regards
Jonboy
Reply from: Alan Greveson
Date: Friday 22nd March 2013 at 7:05 PM

Dear Jonboy,
Unfortunately, no individual service record appears to have survived for William George Nicholls so it is not possible to state his wartime service. An Army medal rolls index card showed he qualified for the British War Medal and the Victory Medal. As he did not qualify for the 1914-15 Star for service overseas before December 31st 1915, he did not serve abroad until some date after January 1st 1916.
He went abroad with the Royal Fusiliers number G/26319 which indicated he had enlisted for wartime service only. At some stage he was transferred to the Royal Engineers with the number 330521. He was then re-numbered in the Royal Engineers as WR/311604. The WR-prefixed numbers appeared to have been issued after about March 1918 to men employed in the Transportation Branch of waterways, railways, roads and quarries troops. The prefix was also used for sappers working on Inland Waterways and Docks.
Kind regards,
Alan
Reply from: Jonboy
Date: Friday 22nd March 2013 at 8:05 PM

Hi Alan
Thanks for looking up on my Grandad.
Jonboy
Reply from: Scoops
Date: Friday 22nd March 2013 at 10:44 PM

Hi jonboy,i think i may have found william george nicholls on www.myheritage.com website. Your numbers match for him but was born in 1883? And states he was awarded the victory medal and the british medal.it also shows the rest of his family tree. Hope its the right one for you.scoops
Reply from: Jonboy
Date: Saturday 23rd March 2013 at 3:08 PM

Hi Scoops
Yes that was my old Tree as i am now on Ancestry.com,because you seem to get much more with them,so yes i forgot my old tree was still there,although,not as big as my new one,thanks for letting me know though.
Jonboy
Posted by: Gina In Canada {Email left}
Location: Canada
Date: Wednesday 20th March 2013 at 3:57 AM
Hi Alan,
You have helped me several times now and I do hope you will help me again :)
I am inquiring about my ggg-grandfather David Baynes, b.1797 St Andrews, Fife, Scotland who enlisted with the 3rd Battalion Royal Artillery in 1813 as a gunner & driver. He married Elizabeth Mathews in 1820 in Chester, first three children were born at Woolwich, David in 1821 & Sarah in 1824 when David lived at the Artillery Barracks, and William in 1827 when he was a corporal and they lived on Red Lion Street. John was born in Limerick in 1829 and Elizabeth was born at Chester in 1838 after David had been discharged in 1836 at Woolwich as unfit for duty. He spent a year in France - the remainder "at home". He was not a Waterlooman.
I wondered if you could tell me what he would have been doing all those years! Would he have been with the army in Chester in 1820? Did he have to live at the barracks? Why were they in Ireland? Also are you able to tell me what kind of equipment he would have been trained on. And I presume he would be riding horses and taking care of them too?
Thank you for your time Alan, it is much appreciated...Gina
PS Also, I was very happy to make a donation to the Royal Legion
Reply from: Alan Greveson
Date: Wednesday 20th March 2013 at 4:26 PM

Dear Gina,
It is not possible to give specific answers to your questions. If David Baynes had been born in 1797 and enlisted in 1813, he would have enlisted as a boy at the age of 16 and would have served in the Army for 21 years to qualify for a pension. He would have spent his time training as an artilleryman drive the horses or be part of the gun team as well as attending to horses and garrison duties in the United Kingdom, which was classed as "home" service. Ireland was part of the "United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland" and was not separated until a hundred years later in 1922. Ireland had extensive areas for military training. (The barracks at Limerick were called "New Barracks"). The headquarters of the Royal Artillery was at Woolwich. When he married in 1820 he was in the Army. He may have been based in Chester. Once married, his wife and children would have become "followers" although a small number would have been permitted to live in barracks earning money as washerwomen or cooks. He may have been able to afford to rent lodgings nearby for the family.
The battalion would have been equipped with light or medium guns. They certainly had shad some 9-pounder guns at Waterloo.
Kind regards,
Alan
Reply from: Gina In Canada
Date: Saturday 23rd March 2013 at 1:00 PM

Thanks very much Alan, the information was very helpful, as always...Gina
Posted by: Jonboy {Email left}
Location: Harlow Essex
Date: Tuesday 19th March 2013 at 10:17 PM
Hi Alan
Hope all is well with you,just found some details on my Gt Uncle John T Turvey Born Around 1880 in Northamptonshire its a bit faded but what i can make out is R.E Corps No: (T) 3419 and 546693 married to a Ada Chimes.Can you please look into this for me please hopefully you can find out out where he served and when.
Kind Regards
Jonboy
Reply from: Alan Greveson
Date: Wednesday 20th March 2013 at 4:27 PM

Dear Jonboy,
There is no evidence to suggest where John Thomas Turvey served overseas. He enlisted in November 1915 with the London Divisional Engineers at the 3rd/1st Field Company RE, 10 Victoria Park Square, London, NE (a Home-based unit). He lived at 42 Stanley Road, South Harrow, with his wife Ada (Ida) Elizabeth (Chimes) married at Evenley, Northamptonshire, 19th July 1902. John Turvey served overseas from 13 July 1916 until an unknown date. He qualified for the British War Medal and the Victory Medal. He was discharged from 646 London Field Company RE (a Home-based unit) in the UK in February 1919.
Kind regards,
Alan
Reply from: Jonby
Date: Wednesday 20th March 2013 at 4:41 PM

Many thanks alan
Jonboy
Posted by: Mark {Email left}
Location: Dunmow
Date: Monday 18th March 2013 at 9:09 PM
Hi Alan,
I have just found your forum whilst trying to conduct some research and was wondering if you could help please. My father and I have just returned from a weekend in France having visited the war grave of my great grandfather. We know very little about him or the regiment he served in as my grandmother (his daughter) was only 4 years old when he was killed. My great Grandfather was Alfred J Bishop and his service number was 6303. He was killed on 21st March 1918 and is buried in Mory nr to Arras. He served in the 2nd/6th Bn. South Staffordshire Regiment. From my own research i know that a german offensive was launched on the day of his death but know little else about the area he was in. I presume he would have been buried near to where he fell? Any help you could provide would be greatly appreciated. I am keen to find out as much as possible and any pointers you may have would help. I am considering contacting the south satffs museum.

Many Thanks in advance

Mark
Reply from: Alan Greveson
Date: Tuesday 19th March 2013 at 11:52 AM

Dear Mark,
No individual service record appears to have survived for Alfred Bishop so it is not possible to state his wartime service.
An Army medal rolls index card showed that Alfred J Bishop qualified for the British War Medal and the Victory Medal. As he did not qualify for the 1914-15 Star for service overseas before December 31st 1915, he did not serve beyond the UK and Ireland until after January 1st 1916. The medal index card recorded his regimental details when he first went overseas as Private Alfred J Bishop 242336 South Staffordshire Regiment who later served in the Labour Corps with the number 224535. The six-digit regimental numbers in the range 240001 to 265000 were allotted to the 6th Battalion South Staffordshire Regiment in February/March 1917 when all Territorial Force soldiers were renumbered as part of a general re-organisation of the system. As the medal index card did not record his earlier regimental number, 6303, which was replaced early in 1917, Alfred Bishop did not serve overseas until after February 1917. The 2nd/6th South Staffordshire Regiment had been raised in 1914 as a second-line reserve battalion to provide reinforcements for the 1st/6th Battalion. The Battalion trained at Luton and St Albans before being sent to Dublin and the Curragh in Ireland in 1916. The 2nd/6th Battalion first served overseas on 25th February 1917 when it landed at Le Havre with the 59th Division. See their war record at:
http://www.1914-1918.net/59div.htm

At some stage, Alfred was transferred to the Labour Corps. The CWGC Debt of Honour stated that A J Bishop was 42 years old and when he died on 21st March 1918 (the opening day of the German offensive on the Somme 1918) he was serving with the 250th Company Labour Corps. He was buried at Mory Abbey Military Cemetery. His widow was Mrs C A Bishop of Guinnesses' Buildings, Vauxhall, London. Before the war, Alfred had been a vegetable cook in a restaurant. He had married Charlotte Annie Eyre at Christ Church, Southwark, on February 15th 1903. He was the son of Alfred Bishop, a French-polisher and his wife Eliza. Charlotte was the daughter of the late George Henry Eyre, a wheelwright.
The Labour Corps is very difficult to research and there appears to be no war diary of 250 Company in the National Archives catalogue. See also:
http://www.labourcorps.co.uk/

Kind regards,
Alan
Posted by: Beth {Email left}
Location: Crowborough
Date: Monday 18th March 2013 at 3:26 PM
I have written to you before about my grandfather William Burgess Benton on my father's side of the family. Now on my mother's side .
Harold Crossley Hildreth Born about 1884 ? Where. Died 1937/38 in the UK. He was in the medical Corp and I also believe he was awarded some medals. His wife's name was Edith Graham Hildreth (nee Davidson) I also believe he resided in Africa, Ireland, and Colchester UK. I hope this will be enough information that will help you. My mother was born in Cork that's why I think he served in Ireland.
Reply from: Alan Greveson
Date: Monday 18th March 2013 at 6:03 PM

Dear Beth,
Lieutenant-Colonel Harold Crossley Hildreth DSO OBE FRCS (Edin) RAMC served in the Royal Army Medical Corps as a doctor and career soldier. He was born (somewhere) on October 25th 1876 and he died at the Empire Nursing Home, Westminster, London on 11th September 1937. His home address when he died was "White Walls", Queen's Road, Colchester. In 1920 his address had been "Shrublands", Beaconsfield. And he had lived at The Maltings, Abberton.
His funeral, with military honours, was held on Wednesday 15th September at Christ Church, Colchester.
He qualified as a doctor after studying at Edinburgh and Glasgow and attained Fellowship of the Royal College of Surgeons in 1901. He became the medical officer of the Sierra Leone Railway and was then commissioned into the Royal Army Medical Corps on August 31st 1903. During the First World War he served with the West Africa Command and qualified for the 1914 Star, the British War Medal and the Victory Medal. He was promoted to Major in 1915 and temporary Lieutenant Colonel whilst in command of a Field Ambulance in 1916. He was promoted substantive Lt-Colonel in 1926. He was Mentioned in Despatches in 1916 and again in 1917. He was awarded the Distinguished Service Order in 1917. He retired from the RAMC in 1931. The "London Gazette" stated: "Lt.-Col. H. C. Hildreth, D.S.O., O.B.E., F.R.C.S. Edin., having attained the age for compulsory retirement, is placed on ret[ired]. Pay 25th Oct. 1931." (London Gazette, published on the 27th October 1931, page 6876). He continued to travel to Sierra Leone and Sekondi Takoradi, Ghana, until the year he died when he contracted malaria on a journey home from Africa.
He had married at Ootacamund, (Udhagamandalam) Tamil Nadu, India, in 1906 (GRO Index Army Marriages (1881 to 1955) 1906 page 205).
He was awarded the OBE in the Birthday Honours of June 1924.
His service record would be held by the UK Ministry of Defence. The MOD will release certain amounts of information about a deceased person depending on whether you are the direct next-of-kin, or not. You can apply for a search using the different application forms for next-of-kin, or with permission of next-of-kin, or as a general enquirer. See:
http://www.veterans-uk.info/service_records/service_records.html

Click on the link and then look for "Service records - requests for service records of deceased service personnel and home guard" in the left-hand column.
You will need proof of death (copy of death certificate); the soldier's date of birth or service number; and next-of-kin's signed permission (unless you are the direct next-of-kin), known as form Part 1. You then need a completed form Part 2 (search details), and cheque for payment. The next-of-kin form (Part 1) is for completion by the next-of-kin of deceased service personnel (or enquirers with the consent of next of kin). The Part 2 form is entitled: "Request forms for service personnel Army" A cheque for GBP 30 should be made payable to "The MOD Accounting Officer" and sent to Army Personnel Centre Secretariat, Disclosures 2, Mail Point 515, Kentigern House, 65, Brown Street, Glasgow G2 8EX Scotland with all the paperwork.
Searches take several months to complete.
Kind regards,
Alan
Reply from: Ian Willden
Date: Friday 27th January 2017 at 10:48 PM

I HAD THE PRIVILEGE TO SERVE LIEUT COL HAROLD CROSSLEY HILDRETH'S GRANDSONS FAMILY, IN THE LATE SEVENTIES EARLY .EIGHTIES. THE LIEUT COLONEL HAD A SON HAROLD JOHN CROSSLEY HILDRETH, BORN IN BURMA IN 1908.HE BECAME A KNIGHT, AND EVENTUALLY HELD THE MILITARY POSITION OF DIRECTOR OF SUPPLY.( ROYAL ARMY ORDNANCE CORPS WAS HIS ORIGINAL UNITS).HE DIED IN 1992, AND IS BURIED IN THE DEEPCUT PARISH CHURCH SURREY. UK.. THE CHURCH IS DESIGNATED AS THE RAOC AND ROYAL LOGISTIC CORPS CHURCH, WITH STAINED GLASS REGIMENTAL BADGES OF LOGISTIC REGIMENTS. HIS GRANDSON JAN H CROSSLEY HILDRETH AND HIS WIFE NOW LIVE IN SW LONDON.

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