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The World War 1 Forum (Page 128)

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Note:- Alan Greveson has retired from the forum to do other things.
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Posted by: Frances {Email left}
Location: Portsmouth
Date: Sunday 3rd March 2013 at 9:46 PM
Hi, we're planning to see the battlefields at the Somme this summer, what is the best area to stay in? what are the best things to see?
Thank you

Posted by: Brian {No contact email}
Location: Howdon
Date: Sunday 3rd March 2013 at 8:16 PM
Dear alan i wonder if you could help me again.i am trying to trace my grandfather robert wrights war record the only imformation i have is his enlistment document, he joined the 43rd regiment at tenby 21st december 1870 aged 18 years having previously served in the 3rd surrey militia until discharge he signed up for twelve and signed to do another twelve his number on the document appears to be 1451 i think he served in india for a number of years and may have married whilst serving their coming back to england about 1888 any more information would be greatley appreciated
Reply from: Alan Greveson
Date: Sunday 3rd March 2013 at 9:49 PM

Dear Brian,
Robert Wright's full service record is available free to visitors to the National Archives at Kew, Surrey. It is available to download online from the Findmypast.co.uk website (pay as you go charges apply: 30 credits required). I am not allowed to transcribe it for you on this forum as that would be a breach of the Findmypast.co.uk subscription terms and conditions and copyright law. Robert served with the 43rd (Monmouthshire) Regiment of Foot which became a Light Infantry regiment and in 1881 was re-titled The Oxfordshire Light Infantry. The regiment served in Burma and India from 20th September 1872. Robert returned from India in 1889, having been injured in an accident. Back in England, on discharge from hospital, he served out his time in the 2nd Battalion The Bedfordshire Regiment. He did not have a "war record" as such, as the British Army in India had a peacetime role policing the Empire at the time Robert was overseas and they were involved in only sporadic disturbances. Visit:
http://www.sofo.org.uk/

Kind regards,
Alan
Reply from: Brian
Date: Monday 4th March 2013 at 11:18 AM

Thanks again for your time and effort alan the information you gave was very helpful i shall go forward with it once again many thanks yours sincerely b f wright

Posted by: Bella {No contact email}
Location: Esher
Date: Sunday 3rd March 2013 at 5:39 PM
Dear Alan,

Just in case have left a message following your reply to Mr. Thornton, France.

Bella
Reply from: Alan Greveson
Date: Sunday 3rd March 2013 at 9:48 PM

Thanks, Bella.
Alan
Posted by: Jeremy Thornton {Email left}
Location: France
Date: Sunday 3rd March 2013 at 10:51 AM
Alan,

I wonder if you can help me again. Whilst writing up the information I have gathered about Vernon & Julian Thornton, I now find that there was another brother called either Herbert or Hubert Thornton who died in 1916. This date makes me wonder if he also served in the Frist World War and was a casuality? He was born in 1873 in Dewsbury West Yorkshire. His parents were Robert Thornton and Louisa Ann Field. Prior to the war he would have been working in the family business, Robert Thornton & Sons Rag Auctioneers located in Dewsbury.

Thank you in advance for any information that you can provide.
Reply from: Alan Greveson
Date: Sunday 3rd March 2013 at 4:21 PM

Dear Jeremy,
The death of a Herbert Thornton born in 1873 was registered at Dewsbury as a civil death in the third quarter of 1916 (GRO Deaths Dewsbury Oct-Dec 1916 Vol 9b Page 843). The National Probate Calendar recorded he lived at 1 Eightlands Cottages, Eightlands Road, Dewsbury. He had married Marion Smith on 5th July 1913 at St John's, Dewsbury. On his marriage certificate he was described as an engineer of Eightlands Road, whose father, Robert was a rag auctioneer. In the 1901 and 1911 censuses he was recorded as a millwright (corn mill engineer). His brothers, Goldwin and Percy were rag auctioneers. Herbert Thornton died on December 30th 1916 at Dewsbury. There was no comparable death in "Soldiers Died in the Great War" or the CWGC Debt of Honour. The amount of biographical information contained in military records is variable and there is no military record for Herbert or Hubert Thornton that positively identifies him.
Goldwin Thornton, of Eightlands Road, died 4th May 1919 at Dewsbury. Probate was granted to Percy and Julian Thornton, rag auctioneers. There are no obvious military records from the First World War for the three eldest brothers: Goldwin, Percy and Ernest. They would have been in their forties at the outbreak of war in 1914 when the recruiting age was initially set at between 19 and 30 years-old.
Kind regards,
Alan
Reply from: Bella Esher
Date: Sunday 3rd March 2013 at 5:35 PM

Dear Alan, I always read your msg. board and when you have given me endless information, there are very often addresses involved which I tend to google; sometimes they are there, sometimes have been demolished but if the buildings are still standing, it's great to copy and add to history. I was curious with an enquiry from a Jeremy Thorton in France and googled the address. The address 1 Eightlands Cottages, Eightlands Road, Dewsbury shows a commercial property for sale £190.000 (you couldn't get a small flat in my area for that much) consisting of several old cottages which have now been converted to office accommodation. Being a little presumptious I thought Mr. Thorton might like to have this information (unless of course, he has it already.

Kind regards, am still researching!

Bella
Reply from: Jeremy Thornton
Date: Sunday 3rd March 2013 at 5:42 PM

Bella,

Do you mean this is the price today?

Jeremy Thornton
Reply from: Bella
Date: Sunday 3rd March 2013 at 7:06 PM

Dear Mr. Thornton,

It would seem so but just to make sure, google the address and it will come up. If the price is right are you buying?!

Regards, Bella
Posted by: Michael Tench {Email left}
Location: Shrewsbury
Date: Saturday 2nd March 2013 at 11:01 AM
Hi, I am trying to find service records/details of Samuel Powell who I believe served in the Sherwood Foresters and had the Reg, No. 1223 when discharged in 1916. I think he enlisted before WW1. I would be grateful for any help in finding any information or pictures of him.
Thanks
Michael
Reply from: Alan Greveson
Date: Saturday 2nd March 2013 at 5:22 PM

Dear Michael,
No individual service record appears to have survived for Samuel Powell so it is not possible to state his service. He was discharged through sickness on June 2nd 1916 when he had been serving as a corporal in the 2nd/8th Battalion The Sherwood Foresters (Nottinghamshire and Derbyshire Regiment) and the 29th Provisional Battalion. He had enlisted in the Army on 20th November 1911.
The 2nd/8th Battalion Sherwood Foresters was a wartime-only battalion which was raised at Newark on 11th September 1914. It was initially raised to provide second line reserves for the first line 8th Battalion Sherwood Foresters which was a pre-war part-time Territorial Army battalion based at Newark. The second 8th Battalion trained at Luton and Watford until April 1916 when it went to Ireland. The 2nd/8th Battalion was sent to France on 26th February 1917.
Soldiers of the Territorial Force had enlisted for home defence only. At the outbreak of war they had to sign an "Imperial Service" agreement changing their terms of enlistment to include service overseas. Those who were not fit enough or declined to serve overseas remained in the UK and from June 1915 were employed in Provisional Battalions intended for coastal defence. The 29th Provisional Battalion was formed in June 1915 from the home service men of the Sherwood Foresters' four Territorial battalions. In 1917 the battalion was on coastal defence duties at Walton on the Naze and became known as the 21st Battalion Sherwood Foresters.
As Samuel Powell enlisted in 1911 he would have either have served in a different regiment prior to the 2nd/8th Battalion being created in 1914, or he may have enlisted in 1911 into the part-time Territorial Sherwood Foresters, possibly with the 1st/8th Battalion. His four-digit regimental number 1223 was typical of but not exclusive to the Territorial Army, suggesting he had enlisted in the Territorials. He did not serve overseas and did not qualify for any medals. He was awarded a Silver War Badge for being discharged through sickness as no longer physically fit for war service.
Kind regards,
Alan
Reply from: Michael Tench
Date: Sunday 3rd March 2013 at 9:50 AM

Hi Alan,
Many thanks for this information. I did not know he had enlisted in 1911 as he was a miner before that in the 1911 census. He did not appear to carry any injuries and so it was always a surprise that he was discharged for sickness - maybe shell shock ? but he started a gymnasium in the years after the war and ran a hotel too. I don't suppose it is likely there would be any photographs of him if he joined as early as 1911?
Many thanks for your help.
Michael
Reply from: Alan Greveson
Date: Sunday 3rd March 2013 at 12:59 PM

Dear Michael,
The Army did not photograph individual soldiers in the early part of the 20th Century. Group photographs may have survived at the Regimental Museum but they rarely name soldiers, so you would need to be able to recognise him.
http://www.wfrmuseum.org.uk/sf_museum.htm
The most common source of photographs is within private family collections. The local newspaper may have reported his death with a portrait photograph borrowed from the family.
Kind regards,
Alan
Reply from: Michael Tench
Date: Monday 4th March 2013 at 8:31 AM

Thanks very much Alan,
At least I can check out local newspapers now and see if anything was recorded.

If I may, would you be able to have a look to see if my mothers elder brother's record survives please. His name was William Thomas Goodfellow and he was in the KSLI and I know received the Mons Star and told of fighting through the Great War and then going to Mesopotamia 1918/20 before leaving the army sometime in 1920. I think he may also have been transferred to a rifle brigade. He is believed to be a Company Serjeant Major at retirement but his surviving children know very little about his service and it would be wonderful to visit them - now in their late 70's and 80's and show them details of their father. His eldest son has died and his medals have vanished and so we don't know his numbers etc. but he enlisted they believe before WW1.
Your help would be very much appreciated. Thanks. Michael
Reply from: Alan Greveson
Date: Monday 4th March 2013 at 6:25 PM

Dear Michael,
It is not possible to make a positive identification of William Goodfellow in the King's Shropshire Light Infantry as there was more than one man with that name who served with the regiment during the war. The most likely Army medal rolls index card showed a William Goodfellow who served with the 1st Battalion KSLI (10125) and the 2nd Battalion Monmouthshire Regiment (268245) before being transferred to the Rifle Brigade (213235). He qualified for the 1914 Star with Mons clasp. As William Thomas Goodfellow served after the war his service record may be held by the Ministry of Defence. The MOD will release certain amounts of information about a deceased person depending on whether you are the direct next-of-kin, or not. You can apply for a search using the different application forms for next-of-kin, or with permission of next-of-kin, or as a general enquirer. See:
http://www.veterans-uk.info/service_records/service_records.html

Click on the link and then look for "Service records - requests for service records of deceased service personnel and home guard" in the left-hand column.
You will need proof of death (copy of death certificate); the soldier's date of birth or service number; and next-of-kin's signed permission (unless you are the direct next-of-kin), known as form Part 1. You then need a completed form Part 2 (search details), and cheque for payment. The next-of-kin form (Part 1) is for completion by the next-of-kin of deceased service personnel (or enquirers with the consent of next of kin). The Part 2 form is entitled: "Request forms for service personnel Army" A cheque for GBP 30 should be made payable to "The MOD Accounting Officer" and sent to Army Personnel Centre Secretariat, Disclosures 2, Mail Point 515, Kentigern House, 65, Brown Street, Glasgow G2 8EX Scotland with all the paperwork.
Searches take several months to complete.
Kind regards,
Alan
Reply from: Michael Tench
Date: Monday 4th March 2013 at 6:38 PM

Alan, Thanks so much for this information - I shall apply for the details as you suggest.
Thanks again for your help and kind regards
Michael
Posted by: Rachel {Email left}
Location: Lewis
Date: Saturday 2nd March 2013 at 9:41 AM
Dear Alan,

I emailed you some weeks ago, and you helpfully pointed me in the right direction for a book I'm currently writing. I've now hit the 10,000 word mark and the plot has moved to France. I am now specifically looking at the role of pigeons in the war. I know that Alfred Osman set up a Pigeon Carrier Service, and have trawled the internet for details. Is this an area you are familiar with? I am looking to see where training of these pigeon handlers would take place (in the UK), and if there are any other good sources you could recommend? The American story of Cher Ami keeps cropping up, but I was looking for similar British tales of pigeon success. Thank you for your time

Rachel
Reply from: Alan Greveson
Date: Saturday 2nd March 2013 at 5:22 PM

Dear Rachel,
The definitive work on the Royal Engineers Carrier Pigeon Service is Osman's "Pigeons in the Great War: A complete History of the Carrier Pigeon Service During the Great War" (London 1928). A more recent "Pigeons to Packhorse" by Alan Harfield is available for less than five pounds.

At the outbreak of the war the British did not have a pigeon service and the first birds were given by the French to the BEF's Intelligence Corps for carrying coded messages. By May 1915, the BEF's II Corps was using pigeons to send messages to higher formations from Battalion headquarters or pigeon posts in the trenches during battle. The original pigeons were birds that had been bred and trained by their civilian owners. The Royal Engineers were responsible for communications during the Great War and pigeons were an effective and efficient replacement for broken telegraph wires. The birds were kept in reserve until telegraph communications were broken and then employed to carry coded messages. In June 1915 the Carrier Pigeon Service of the Royal Engineers was allowed to recruit 60 pigeon specialists who would have been men already experienced in keeping homing pigeons in civilian life. The remainder of the handlers would have been trained on the job in France and Flanders. The men who looked after the birds were dubbed "pigeoneers" but by the end of the war their official title was "Loftsman". In 1915 the First Army had 202 birds at 15 pigeon stations. By 1918, each of the five Armies in France and Flanders had 1 motor Mobile Pigeon Loft, 14 horse drawn lofts and three fixed lofts. As the service expanded in 1916, the mobile lofts were introduced and the service again expanded in 1917 when artillery Forward Observation Officers and tank crews were provided with messenger pigeons.
When the birds were taken into the front line there was a danger they would be over-fed or spoiled by being treated too much like pets. The most common route was to carry a message from a Battalion HQ to a Brigade HQ, a flight of about 10 or 20 minutes. The pigeon loft was sited next to the HQ's communication office. Soldiers appreciated the use of the birds as it reduced the need for someone to act as a runner across the battlefield.
At the end of the war there were 400 men attending 150 mobile pigeon lofts.
Kind regards,
Alan
Reply from: Rachel
Date: Friday 8th March 2013 at 10:46 AM

Dear Alan,

Thank you so much for your response- have ordered the book!

Rachel
Posted by: Jeremy Ardley {Email left}
Location: Australia
Date: Friday 1st March 2013 at 6:30 AM
I am looking for information on my Grandfather Charles Smith.

He enlisted in WW-I well under-age. He served in the Horse Artillery as an Other Ranks.

He was awarded the Military Medal and I believe he was mentioned in despatches more than once.

I would like if possible to find the citation for the MM and the text of the Despatches.

Thanks in advance for any assistance.
Reply from: Alan Greveson
Date: Friday 1st March 2013 at 3:03 PM

Dear Jeremy,
It is not possible to identify Charles Smith without knowing his regimental number as the name occurs frequently. The citation for the Military Medal was generally given to the soldier at the time and was the only copy, although unit war diaries or headquarters records may record the award. It would be necessary to know which unit(s) he served in and then commission research at the UK National Archives. The official publication "The London Gazette" listed the awards of the Military Medal by name, regimental number and home town. The Gazette also listed those who were Mentioned in Despatches as well as the Despatches themselves. The Mention was a list of names appended to a commander's despatch.
http://www.london-gazette.co.uk/search

Kind regards,
Alan
Posted by: Heather {Email left}
Location: Melbourne Australia
Date: Thursday 28th February 2013 at 11:51 AM
Hi
Im am searching my great gradfathers records and found out he served in WW1 and joined in 1915 his regiment no 6139 and was 35yrs old at enlistment I think he was in the The queens battalion he lived at bell fields stoke guildford at the time of enlistment Is there more than one queens regiment in that area and are you able shed any more info on his rank and regiment etc and service details thanks in advance
Reply from: Alan Greveson
Date: Thursday 28th February 2013 at 12:19 PM

What was his name?
Alan
Reply from: Heather Flack
Date: Thursday 28th February 2013 at 9:17 PM

Important information would be helpful for you sorry

his name was Francis William Cumber married in 1903 to Mary Edwards and died in 1962 as far as I know thanks
Reply from: Alan Greveson
Date: Friday 1st March 2013 at 11:45 AM

Dear Heather,
Francis William Cumber volunteered to join the Army under the Derby Scheme which was a last call for volunteers before compulsory conscription was introduced. The deadline for enlisting was 15th December 1915 and men who enlisted under the scheme were sent home and told they would be called-up when required. Francis Cumber volunteered at the age of 35. He was married to Mary Edwards on 9th March 1903 and had five children; the youngest, Agnes Burlin Cumber, born in August 1915. Francis enlisted on 11th December 1915 at the local Territorial Army unit, the 5th Battalion The Queen's (Royal West Surrey Regiment) at Guildford; regimental number 6139. In December 1915, that would have been the 2nd/5th Battalion The Queen's (Royal West Surrey Regiment) which was part of the 67th Division. On 3rd June 1916 he was mobilized but after 10 days was placed on the Reserve. He would have returned home to his civilian work. On May 24th 1917 he was transferred from the Reserve to the Corps of Royal Engineers and was posted to the 2nd Home Counties Royal Engineers (Territorial Force) which was also part of 67th Division. His new regimental number was 534892. The Army probably intended him to serve as a bricklayer in uniform as he was a skilled tradesman and had the rank of Sapper (skilled private soldier). He was posted to the 2nd Provisional Company Royal Engineers on May 25th 1917 which was based at Clacton-on-Sea in Essex and then to the 2nd London Reserve Company R.E.. On 14th September 1917 he had been discharged from the 5th London General Hospital (St Thomas's). Why he was there was not recorded. He was discharged from hospital as "suitable for light duties". He joined the 564th (Hampshire) Works Company Royal Engineers and a year later was discharged from the Army on 1st October 1918 as no longer physically fit for war service. As he did not serve overseas he did not qualify for any medals. He was awarded a Silver War Badge for being discharged through wounds or sickness as a result of wartime service.
Kind regards,
Alan
Posted by: Lisa Wilkinson {Email left}
Location: Ballymena N Ireland
Date: Wednesday 27th February 2013 at 6:28 PM
Hi, I would appreciate anything you could tell me about my grandfather Mark Lynas. Here are the details I have

Name: LYNAS, MARK
Initials: M
Nationality: United Kingdom
Rank: Lance Corporal
Regiment/Service: Royal Inniskilling Fusiliers
Unit Text: 2nd Bn.
Age: 32
Date of Death: 18/05/1940
Service No: 2872731
Additional information: Son of Joseph Lynas and of Margaret Lynas (nee McNeill), of Ballymena, Co. Antrim, Northern Ireland; husband of Margaret Hawke Lynas (nee Power), of Harryville, Ballymena.
Casualty Type: Commonwealth War Dead
Grave/Memorial Reference: Grave 1.
Cemetery: HALLE COMMUNAL CEMETERY
Reply from: Alan Greveson
Date: Wednesday 27th February 2013 at 9:39 PM

Dear Lisa,
I do not research soldiers from the Second World War. Unlike the records of soldiers who served earlier, records of soldiers who served after 1921 are held securely by the UK Ministry of Defence and are protected under the UK Data Protection Act of 1998. For a fee, the MOD will release certain amounts of information about a deceased person depending on whether you are the direct next-of-kin, or not. You can apply for a search using the different application forms for next-of-kin, or with permission of next-of-kin, or as a general enquirer. See:
http://www.veterans-uk.info/service_records/service_records.html

Click on the link and then look for "Service records - requests for service records of deceased service personnel and home guard" in the left-hand column.
You will need proof of death (copy of death certificate); the soldier's date of birth or service number; and next-of-kin's signed permission (unless you are the direct next-of-kin), known as form Part 1. You then need a completed form Part 2 (search details), and cheque for payment. The next-of-kin form (Part 1) is for completion by the next-of-kin of deceased service personnel (or enquirers with the consent of next of kin). The Part 2 form is entitled: "Request forms for service personnel Army" A cheque for GBP 30 should be made payable to "The MOD Accounting Officer" and sent to Army Personnel Centre Secretariat, Disclosures 2, Mail Point 515, Kentigern House, 65, Brown Street, Glasgow G2 8EX Scotland with all the paperwork.
Searches take several months to complete.
Kind regards,
Alan
Reply from: Koen Nerinckx
Date: Sunday 6th October 2013 at 10:59 AM

Dear Lisa,

My name is Nerinckx Koen and I live close to Halle. And I have done some research to the soldiers who died in Halle. I have a copy of the war dairy of the mayor of Halle.
He describes what happened to your grandfather Lynas Mark. If you want I can translate that part of the diary for you. I also have photo's of his grave. He was the second soldier of the 2nd Bn Royal Inniskilling Fusiliers to by killed. The first KIA was Sgt Gildea Thomas James.

Regards Koen
Reply from: Lisa Wilkinson
Date: Monday 13th October 2014 at 8:12 AM

I have no idea why I am only seeing this message from Nerinckx Koen now, however I would very much appreciate any information you have on my grandfathers time in Halle. I visited his grave last year so have photos thank you.
Posted by: Bill Henley {Email left}
Location: Stroud Gloucestershire
Date: Wednesday 27th February 2013 at 5:18 PM
My grandfather Frederick John Henley (1883 - 1940) number 2458 , signed up on 9th July 1914 in Southall Middlesex. He was at the second battle of Ypres with the 1/8 Middlesex Territorials and I think that he later served on the Somme. He was demobbed in 1919. I would welcome any advice please on researching his military history. Many thanks.
Reply from: Alan Greveson
Date: Wednesday 27th February 2013 at 9:34 PM

Dear Bill,
Frederick John Henley's service record is available free at the National Archives at Kew or it can be viewed on the ancestry.co.uk website (subscription required). Many local libraries offer free access to the Ancestry website. You may have to join the library; book a computer in advance and pay for printing. At a Local Studies Library, staff may do it for you. If you are researching just one soldier, it would be uneconomical to take out an Ancestry website subscription. Do not succumb to websites claiming to have "Millions of records. Find your ancestors now!" You may find nothing.
Frederick's service record, which is water and fire damaged, actually provides very little additional information other than the dates on which he was granted leave in 1916 and 1918 and the dates he was admitted to hospital sick in July 1917 and again in October 1918. He enlisted in the pre-war Territorial Army in the 8th Battalion Duke of Cambridge's Own Middlesex Regiment and remained with them until 13th February 1919. He was renumbered from 2458 to 240339 in February/March 1917 when all Territorial soldiers were re-numbered.
The 8th Battalion served in Gibraltar, which was not a war zone, from September 1914 to February 1915 when it returned to England and then went to France on 9th March 1915. It served with three infantry brigades in the 28th Division; 8th Division and 56th Divisions.
His record would be similar to the 8th Battalion's record which is recorded in its war diaries that are held in three separate "Catalogue Pieces" at The National Archives at Kew. Fortunately, two of them have been digitised and can be downloaded for a small charge of £3.36 each. They are for the period March - June 1915 and (after a gap) Feb 1916. - May 1919. They are contained with other diaries in very large PDF files of 600 or more pages. See:
http://discovery.nationalarchives.gov.uk/SearchUI/s/res?_q=%228+Battalion+Middlesex%22+&x=0&y=0&_sd=yyyy&_ed=yyyy

Identify the record in those results, and then click on its title and then click on "go to record" and proceed to basket. The other, third, diary for June 1915 to February 1916 is held only at Kew. All war diaries will be digitised in the near future.

For a brief record of the battalion's movements see:
http://www.1914-1918.net/msex.htm
That website, established by Chris Baker, also lists the engagements of each of the Divisions throughout the war. Click on "Formations" and then "British Divisions". Chris Baker's site has a wealth of detail about soldier's lives and the organisation and conduct of the war.

Frederick J. Henley qualified for the 1914-15 Star; the British War Medal and the Victory Medal. An Army medal rolls index card can be downloaded on a page with others, in black and white, from the National Archives (charges apply) or the ancestry.co.uk website which has digitised the cards individually in colour.
See also:
http://nationalarchives.gov.uk/records/looking-for-person%5Cdefault.htm

The regimental history of all the regiment's battalions was published 1926 and 1930 in two volumes with maps. It has been re-printed by the Naval and Military Press at £38. "The Die Hards in the Great War" by Everard Wyrall, ISBN 9781843423737. It is currently on offer for £22.
http://www.naval-military-press.com/die-hards-in-the-great-war-middlesex-regiment.html

I can recommend the company and its products, although their estimated speed of delivery can be optimistic. Incidentally, a first edition of "Die Hards" would cost you up to £225. Whilst you may need only the history of the 8th Battalion, the published Regimental History will bring the war diaries to life, as the diaries cover only the battalion's time in a theatre of war (from March 1915) and do not always identify places other than by grid references. Nor do they place daily actions into the context of the evolving war. The diaries themselves, on the other hand, do include valuable appendices and copies of contemporary regimental orders, so you have an opportunity to compare and balance primary and secondary sources of evidence.
Museums often have their own archives as well as displays. The Middlesex Regiment's Collection is held at The National Army Museum, Royal Hospital Road, London, SW3 4HT.
Kind regards,
Alan
Reply from: Bill Henley
Date: Wednesday 27th February 2013 at 10:20 PM

Very many thanks for your quick reply. I shall follow up the leads that you suggest.

Bill Henley

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