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Alan Greveson's World War 1 Forum (Page 128)

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Posted by: Wag {Email left}
Location: Uk
Date: Sunday 11th November 2012 at 8:41 PM
Hello,
my G.Grandfather served in both the HLI and Royal Engineers in WW1, I have a copy of the medal card but I have been unable to obtain further details of service, location and Battalion etc. Would you be able you be able to
assist please. His name was James Waggett.
Reply from: Alan Greveson
Date: Monday 12th November 2012 at 1:26 PM

There is no surviving service record for James Waggett so it is not possible to suggest his military service. As he did not qualify for the 1914-15 Star he did not serve overseas until some date after January 1st 1916. He apparently served in two different battalions of the HLI and then transferred to the Royal Engineers. His WR number meant he was moved to the RE Transportation Branch probably in the spring of 1918. Unfortunately there is no evidence to identify in which battalions or companies he served.
Kind regards,
Alan

Posted by: Neil Bryant {Email left}
Location: Cardiff
Date: Sunday 11th November 2012 at 8:23 PM
Good Evening Alan
I am trying to obtain further information regarding my Grandfather`s service in WW1 and if particular the circumstances in which he was awarded the Military Medal.
I have his medals and copy of his record card which is stamped "Egypt" and the date of notification in Gazette was 10-4-18.
Family members recall him mentioning "Alexandria" on his return.
I have some information which is listed below.

Name: William James Bryant
Regiment: Royal Field Artillery 390 By RFA (TF)
Regimental No: 730492
Rank: Seargent/ Acting WO class 2

I hope this information is helpful
Kind Regards
Neil Bryant
Reply from: Alan Greveson
Date: Monday 12th November 2012 at 1:25 PM

Dear Neil,
No individual service record has survived for William James Bryant so it is not possible to suggest his wartime service. An Army medal rolls index card showed he qualified for the British War Medal and the Victory Medal. As he did not qualify for the 1914-15 Star for service overseas he did not serve in a theatre of war until some date after January 1st 1916. His six-digit regiment number is similar to, but not exclusive to, Territorial Force numbers allotted after March 1917 when all TF men received new numbers. As the card does not record his earlier number it could suggest he did not enter a theatre of war until after March 1917.
The number 730492 was within the range 730001-735000. These numbers were allotted to the 266 Brigade RFA and 341 Brigade RFA both of which had been part of the Welsh Artillery Brigade. The men of 266 Brigade served overseas with the 53rd Division and those of 341 Brigade remained on home defence duties or were posted as drafts overseas. It is therefore possible William was posted overseas in 1917, although he may have served in the UK since the outbreak of war rising to the rank of acting Battery Sergeant Major by the time he went to Egypt.
390 By is not a distinct description of an artillery unit, although it would apply to 390 Battery which was formed in Egypt in September 1917 as part of XXXVII Brigade RFA (37 Brigade) which served with the newly-formed 75th Division. The Division was created in June 1915 from Indian troops and Territorial units who had been in India which was not a theatre of war. The artillery was put in place by October 1917 and the Division then fought at The Third Battle of Gaza (27th October 7th November 1917); the Capture of Gaza on 6th 7th November); The Capture of Junction Station (13th 14th November 1917) and the Battle of Nabi Samweil (20th 24th November 1917). In 1918 the Division fought at The Battle of Tell'Asur (11th 12th March 1918); The Battle of Berukin (9th 11th April 1918); and The Battle of Sharon (19th September 1918).
Alexandria was the port of embarkation and arrival for all soldiers who passed through Egypt.
Citations for the Military Medal were given to the man with his medal. It took some months for the citation to be approved and listed in the "London Gazette", so it is not possible to say what the occasion was but it was probably in November 1917.
Kind regards,
Alan
Posted by: Emma Young {Email left}
Location: Bletchley
Date: Sunday 11th November 2012 at 8:21 PM
Hello

I wonder if you could help me. I am looking into my family history and I am stuck with my great uncle. His name is Albert E Spencer, born Norfolk 1896 in 1911 he was in Cornwall. The family lived in caravans so traveled a lot. My nan always said she had a brother that was killed in action durning the 1st world war. But I'm so stuck can you recommend anything to help me on my search?

Thanks and regard

Emma young
Reply from: Emma Young
Date: Sunday 11th November 2012 at 8:28 PM

Sorry family names might help as well.

Father Elisa spencer
Mother Selina Spencer (Cramfield)
Sisters
Ellen
Esther
Stella
Annie
olive

Brother
Elisa

Thank you so much and I hope you cam help me
Reply from: Alan Greveson
Date: Monday 12th November 2012 at 1:24 PM

Dear Emma,
You do not have sufficient information to immediately identify Albert Spencer. You would need to know which branch of the services he was with Army or Navy; his regimental number and regiment. The CWGC has a Debt of Honour which lists 82 people by the surname Spencer and the initial A. Few of their records have biographical information to identify them, although some do. It is free to search at:
http://www.cwgc.org/
The other published source is "Soldiers Died in the Great War" (HMSO 1921). It lists 24 Albert Spencers but none of them was identified as being born in Norfolk.
One unpublished source of soldiers' original death records is held by the Western Front Association.
The records are mainly for soldiers who had dependants and who received a pension. See:
http://www.westernfrontassociation.com/great-war-current-news/pension-records.html

If he died "in the First World War" that does not automatically imply he died on active service.

Kind regards,
Alan

Posted by: Simon G {Email left}
Location: Troy Il Usa
Date: Sunday 11th November 2012 at 6:13 PM
Hello Alan,

My Father's great uncle, Albert John Cook service number 12098 was killed in action July 3rd 1916. He was a member of the 7th Btn, Suffolk Regiment. The family story is that he sent souvenir tea-spoons back to his family in England. I now have these in my possession. They are from St. Omer, Arras, Arementiere and Albert. These make sense to me based on the locations of the 7th that I have been able to research from when they arrived in France.

A couple of questions... Is there any record of his enlistment? I am curious if in fact he was with the battalion from when it first arrived in France. Second, it is my assumption that he was killed in the advance on Ovilliers, hard to reach any other conclusion, but have nothing but the date of death and the knowledge of where the 7th was that day.

If you can add more information, it would be wonderful
Thanks
Simon
Reply from: Alan Greveson
Date: Sunday 11th November 2012 at 7:22 PM

Dear Simon,
No individual service record has survived for Albert John Cook, so it is not possible to state his date of enlistment. An Army medal rolls index card showed he entered France with the 7th Battalion the Suffolk Regiment on 30th May 1915 which was the date the 7th Battalion first arrived in France as a complete battalion. It is therefore likely he was one of their original soldiers. The 7th Battalion was raised at Bury St Edmunds on 20th August 1914 and trained at Shorncliffe and Aldershot. It served in France with the 35th Infantry Brigade in the 12th Division. On the day he was killed in action, the 35th Brigade was fighting at Ovilliers. See:
http://www.1914-1918.net/12div.htm

The battalion's war diary is held at the National Archives at Kew, Surrey in Catalogue reference WO95/1852 but it is not available online at the moment. The National Archives hopes to place all the diaries online in the next year or two.
Kind regards,
Alan
Posted by: Ross {Email left}
Location: Saltash
Date: Sunday 11th November 2012 at 5:31 PM
Hi my mum has given me a task to try and find out any information about this banner. from what i have found out it was on Mussolini and my grans uncle took it and brought it back with him thats about all i know about it, i have a app on my phone which searches logos and it came up with fascio littorio? i dont have a better picture at the moment but its about the size of a double bed when layed out. any information would be great.

picture link below.
http://i16.photobucket.com/albums/b16/saltash/3B4CE4E8-1042-4EB2-AB54-1B50CFA6D299-1113-00000009CC194FA6.jpg
Reply from: Alan Greveson
Date: Sunday 11th November 2012 at 7:34 PM

Dear Ross
Fascio littorio referes to bundles of birch rods and dates back to ancient Rome. In English the translation would be fasces. The banner appears to be a banner or flag of the Italian Fascist Party (The National Fascist Party (Partito Nazionale Fascista; PNF) created by Mussolini. See:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fasces

Kind regards,
Alan
Reply from: Ross
Date: Thursday 15th November 2012 at 6:40 PM

Thanks for the information, do you know anywhere i might be able to get some more information about it.
Reply from: Alan Greveson
Date: Thursday 15th November 2012 at 9:50 PM

Dear Ross,
It may not be possible to discover more about an individual flag or banner. It may have been a souvenir from the Second World War collected by some member of the family who fought in Italy.
Alan
Posted by: Keebs {Email left}
Location: Bangor
Date: Sunday 11th November 2012 at 5:01 PM
I am researching a relative from WW1 if anyone an help please. ?
Bertie Edwin Chapman .Joined aged 27 . RFA Territorial. 1914/5 Star. BWM & Victory , plus Territorial efficiency award. 1927
But that's as far as I can get . Could have sustained injuries
Posted by: Robert {Email left}
Location: Croydon Surrey
Date: Sunday 11th November 2012 at 2:49 PM
Hi, I wonder if anyone can offer some guidance as I am something of a novice when it comes to anything military!

My GGrandfather Alfred Giles 1884-1917 was a private in the South Wales Borderers ( regiment No 44411 ) and he was killed in action on 31st July 1917, I know he has a memorial at Ypres CWG cemetery but that's all I know?

In particular I'm looking for any info regarding when he left England and basically where he died? I believe that he was in the 11th battalion but I'm not certain of that?

If anyone can help or offer some guidance as to where to go from here l would be extremely grateful.

Kind regards

Robert
Reply from: Alan Greveson
Date: Sunday 11th November 2012 at 7:20 PM

Dear Robert,
No individual service record appears to have survived for Alfred Giles so it is not possible to say when he went abroad. Sixty per cent of First World War service records were destroyed by bombing in London in 1940.
The CWGC states Alfred Giles is commemorated on the Menin Gate Memorial which is on the Menin Road at Ypres in Belgium. "Soldiers Died in the Great War" (HMSO 1921) recorded he was "killed in action" on 31st July 1917 while serving with the 11th Battalion the South Wales Borderers. It also recorded he had previously served in the Royal Engineers. An Army medal rolls index card (for overseas campaign medals) recorded only that he served overseas as a private in the South Wales Borderers, therefore his prior service in the Royal Engineers would have been in the UK only. Alfred Giles qualified for the British War Medal and the Victory Medal. As he did not qualify for the 1914-15 Star for service overseas before December 31st 1915, he did not serve abroad until after January 1st 1916.
The 11th Battalion South Wales Borderers went to France in December 1915 and served in the 115th Infantry Brigade with the 38th Division. Their first major battle was The Battle of Albert on July 1st 1916 (part of the Battles of the Somme 1916). The 38th Division suffered such heavy losses it was withdrawn from the line and did not fight again until a year later.
Alfred could have joined the South Wales Borderers in France early in 1916 and survived the Battle of Albert but it is more feasible he was part of a draft of reinforcements to the 11th Battalion to build up their numbers after their losses in July 1916. Their next major engagement was on July 31st 1917 which was the opening day of the Third Battle of Ypres 1917 at Pilckelm and was the day on which Alfred was killed. The fighting started shortly before 4 a.m. with the 115th Brigade on the Yser Canal.
Kind Regards,
Alan
Reply from: Robert
Date: Sunday 11th November 2012 at 8:12 PM

Hi Alan,

You have my sincere thanks for the wealth of information you have supplied me with, it is most generous of you to give up your time to help and I am indebted to you.

Best wishes

Robert Salisbury
Posted by: Tricia {Email left}
Location: Leeds
Date: Sunday 11th November 2012 at 2:42 PM
Dear Alan ,
Having been recently given a photo of my husbands grandfather in military uniform on a horse. I am interested to find if he has any wartime records as I have been unable to find any myself. I know he was born in Holbeck Leeds. 27 April 1881. and died 24 Dec. 1936 his name was Walter Kirby. The picture had written on the back 222569 Dr. W. Kirby 33rd Battery R.F.A. Maryhill Barracks. Glasgow. I would be most grateful for any help I think your forum is brilliant.
Reply from: Alan Greveson
Date: Sunday 11th November 2012 at 7:20 PM

Dear Tricia,
No individual service record appears to have survived for Walter Kirby. An Army medal rolls index card recorded he was a (horse) driver with the Royal Field Artillery. He qualified for the British War Medal and the Victory Medal. As he did not qualify for the 1914-15 Star for service overseas before December 31st 1915, he did not serve overseas until some time after January 1st 1916. It is not possible to say when he first went abroad. The 33rd Brigade RFA existed before the war and in August 1914 it was stationed at Exeter. In October 1914 it joined the XXXIII Brigade RFA which served with the Army's 8th Division in France and Flanders.
For a history of the 8th Division see:
http://www.1914-1918.net/8div.htm

As Walter did not go to France until after January 1st 1916, it is not possible to identify in which battles he fought as his date of arrival is not known. Maryhill Barracks was home to a Royal Artillery training depot so the photograph could have been taken whilst he was in training. The notes on the reverse could have been added at any time and the details may not have been contemporary to when the photograph was taken: they could have been added years later.
Kind regards,
Alan
Posted by: Jenny Davies {No contact email}
Location: Cambridge
Date: Sunday 11th November 2012 at 12:10 PM
Dear Alan,

I wonder if you could help by finding out if the soldier below is Albert Edward Ferguson d.o.b. 1885?

WWII 1941
First Name: A.E.
Initials: A.E.
Surname: Ferguson
Rank: Major
Service: Home Guard
Unit: 1st City of Edinburgh Battalion
Nationality: British
Duty Location: City of Edinburgh
Gallantry Awards: Distinguished Conduct Medal,
Resided Town: Edinburgh
Resided County: Edinburgh
Service From Date: 01/02/41

Many thanks,
Jenny
Reply from: Alan Greveson
Date: Sunday 11th November 2012 at 7:19 PM

Dear Jenny,
I do not research the Second World War. Home Guard service records are held by the Ministry of Defence who may release details to the next of kin of deceased former Home Guard members. See:

http://www.mod.uk/DefenceInternet/AboutDefence/CorporatePublications/PersonnelPublications/ServiceRecords/RequestFormsForHomeGuardRecords.htm

Kind regards,
Alan.
Posted by: Andrew Aitken {No contact email}
Location: Saxmundham
Date: Saturday 10th November 2012 at 11:12 PM
I should like to research the World War 1 service of my grandfather, Andrew Aitken, born Midlothian, Scotland c.1886, one of four brothers who all survived the Western Front. Andrew was commissioned and served with the Black Watch. I have his Sam Browne and a compass with an indistinct, faded inscription on the leather case, which appears to read "A Aitken 8th Black Watch". (The Bn number is particularly indistinct.)
Thanks very much.
Andrew Aitken
Reply from: Alan Greveson
Date: Sunday 11th November 2012 at 1:20 PM

Dear Andrew,
Service records for officers who served up to the end of 1921 are held at the UK National Archives at Kew, Surrey. They are difficult to positively identify as many officers were known by their initials and surname. See:
http://www.nationalarchives.gov.uk/records/looking-for-person/officerbritisharmyafter1913.htm

If he served after December 1921 you would need to apply to the Ministry of Defence for his records.
The war diary of the 8th Battalion The Black Watch (Royal Highlanders) is held at the UK National Archives in catalogue reference WO95/ 1766 (May 1915 to February 1919) and WO/95/3092/11 (March to August 1919)
Kind regards,
Alan
Reply from: Andrew Aitken
Date: Sunday 11th November 2012 at 4:36 PM

Thanks very much Alan - most helpful. I'll follow that up.
Andrew

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