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Posted by: Liz {Email left}
Location: Isle Of Wight
Date: Monday 11th March 2013 at 5:36 PM
Dear Alan, I am trying to find any information on a William Eastman b.1845 and d.1890. He was in the Royal Artillery and stationed at Picton Place, Carmarthen, Carmarthenshire, Wales in 1884. He died at 19 Picton Place in 1890. He was married to a Catherine Hoey. They had William jnr who was born at Picton Place in 1884 - this being why I am sure he was there at that time. This is all I know about him. Any help would be greatly appreciated. Kind Regards. Liz
Reply from: Alan Greveson
Date: Monday 11th March 2013 at 8:36 PM

Dear Liz,
You would be fortunate to find a service record for William Eastman unless he served long enough to receive a pension. There is no obvious record for him. The place of birth for a child provides primary evidence only that the mother and child were present. Soldiers were not stationed at domestic street addresses unless they served in the part-time Volunteers or Militia and lived at home. The age at death (45) of William Eastman whose death was recorded in 1890 may not be accurate as the stated age could only be provided by someone other than William. A William Eastman married a Catherine Hoey at Naas, Co. Kildare in Ireland in Jan-Mar 1879 (Vol 2 page 815). You can apply for certificates online at
http://www.hse.ie/eng/services/find_a_service/bdm/certificates_ie

Kind regards,
Alan
Posted by: Robert Leeson {Email left}
Location: Regina Sk Canada
Date: Monday 11th March 2013 at 3:53 PM
Do you have any information on a William Bayliss that served in the first world war in the Royal Engineers. I am visiting with a friend, Paul Davies. It is possible that our grandfathers may have met one another.
Reply from: Alan Greveson
Date: Monday 11th March 2013 at 4:12 PM

Dear Robert,
It is not possible to identify a soldier by name only. It is necessary to know additional information such as his regimental number; address on enlistment; year of birth. There were at least five men named William Bayliss who served in the Royal Engineers.
Kind regards,
Alan
Reply from: Robert Leeson
Date: Wednesday 13th March 2013 at 3:37 AM

Thanks Alan. My friend suggested that it would help if I can find a regimental number which I am now looking for. At least it was only 5 William Baylisses and not 135 like my friend thought might occur!
Posted by: Dave Williams {Email left}
Location: Birmingham
Date: Monday 11th March 2013 at 10:36 AM
Am trying to find some information regards Charles George Robert Marsh, I know he served in the Royal Field Artillery as I have his medals, there are only two medals, from the medal record card downloaded from The National Archive he wasn't entitled to any star medal. The number on the medals is 911554, on the medal record card this is preceeded by TF which I think refers to Territorial Force, the medal card also indicates a second number 281675. Other than this all I know is he survived the war as he was later presented with a Special Constabulary Medal during WW2. Any info would great.
Reply from: Alan Greveson
Date: Monday 11th March 2013 at 5:12 PM

Dear Dave,
No individual service record appears to have survived for Charles Marsh 911554 RFA so it may not be possible to trace his wartime service. The six-digit regimental numbers of the Territorial Force were allotted in February/March 1917 when all Territorial soldiers were re-numbered. If Charles had served before 1917 he may have had an (unrecorded) earlier TF regimental number. His medal rolls index card showed he did not qualify for the 1914-15 Star for service overseas before December 31st 1915, therefore he did not serve overseas until some occasion after January 1st 1916.
In early 1917, the regimental number 911554 was allotted to the Kent batteries of the Royal Field Artillery. The numbers in the range 910001-915000 were allotted to 222 Brigade RFA TF (1st/3rd Home Counties Brigade) which served in India and Mesopotamia. In Roman numerals it was designated CCXXII Brigade RFA in the 44th Home Counties Division.
When 222 Brigade left for India a second-line Territorial Force brigade was created to replace it at home. This was the 337 (CCCXXXVII) Brigade RFA (2nd/3rd Home Counties Brigade). This Brigade served in the UK until November 1917 when it was sent to Mesopotamia and joined the 18th Indian Division in February 1918.
The rules for issuing the British War Medal were that it was to be impressed with the details of the solider when he first served overseas. Therefore, in theory, Charles Marsh went abroad in 1917 after he had been given the new six-digit regimental number 911554 as that was the number stamped on his medals. He might, therefore, have served in 337 Brigade RFA in Mesopotamia from November 1917.
However, he was allotted a second regimental number, 281675, which it has not proved possible to trace. It is not known when he was allotted that number, so it is not possible to say with which other unit he served, nor where that unit was. Some other men with RFA numbers starting 911 also transferred to another unit with numbers starting 281. Many RFA six-digit numbers beginning 281 were allotted in the UK from the summer of 1919.
It is possible the Royal Artillery Museum may be able to identify the unit that allotted the number 281675 and whether it was a Territorial number of a post-war number. See:
http://www.firepower.org.uk/index.php/research/

The war diary of 222 Brigade is held at the National Archives at Kew, Surrey in item reference WO95/5188. The diary for 337 Brigade is WO95/5221.
Kind regards,
Alan
Reply from: Davew
Date: Monday 11th March 2013 at 5:40 PM

Thanks, some details add up as I know he lived and died in Kent so the fact his number is allocated to a Kent Brigade makes perfect sense.

Having some more details will now allow me to move on and do some more digging, many thanks.
Posted by: Bill Henley {Email left}
Location: Stroud Gloucestershire
Date: Friday 8th March 2013 at 10:59 AM
I hope that I am not putting on you if I ask about another brother of my grandfather Frederick Henley. I have two notes about him. 1. Private Harry Henley 9547, B Coy 5th Batt, Wilts Regt, British Expeditionary Force. 2. Private Harry Henley 9547, B Coy 5th Batt, Wilts Regt, Bombay Presidency, General Hospital, San Stefano, Alexandria , Egypt. The latter suggests that he was at Gallipoli or in Egypt but my father told the story of all three brothers (Frederick, Albert & Harry) meeting by chance one evening at a pub in France during the war. Advice on further research would be very welcome.Your help has been much appreciated and I am arranging for a a donation to the British Legion as you request. Many thanks Bill Henley
Reply from: Alan Greveson
Date: Friday 8th March 2013 at 8:05 PM

Dear Bill,
No individual service record has survived for Harry Henley so it is not possible to state his wartime service in detail. An Army medal rolls index card showed he entered the Balkans theatre of war with the Duke of Edinburgh's Wiltshire Regiment on 30th June 1915. The 5th Battalion Wiltshire Regiment (in 13th Division) had sailed from Avonmouth for the Mediterranean and Mudros and by 4th July 1915 had moved to Mudros, the embarkation camp for landing at Gallipoli. The infantry landed on Cape Helles where they relieved 29th Division for the period 16th to 30th July. They left and returned to Mudros at the end of the month, and the Wiltshires landed with the Division at ANZAC Cove on August 4th 1915. When Gallipoli was evacuated in January 1916 the Battalion moved to Egypt. The 5th Battalion Wiltshire Regiment served with the 40th Infantry Brigade in the 13th (Western) Division.
The 13th Division did not serve in France. In February 1916 the Division moved to Mesopotamia where it remained until the end of the war.
The hospital in San Stefano, Alexandria, was the "Bombay Presidency General Hospital" which was one of two hospitals there run by the Indian Medical Services. Alexandria itself was a cosmopolitan city which became the Headquarters of the Mediterranean Expeditionary Force. Severe medical cases would have been treated at Alexandria before patients were returned to the UK by hospital ship.
Harry Henley was discharged to the Class Z Reserve (no date) which suggests he was physically fit at the end of the war to be recalled from the reserve if necessary.
It is possible that he continued to serve in the 5th Battalion in Mesopotamia which would discount the story of the three brothers meeting in France. Otherwise he would have to have been transferred to another battalion of the regiment that served in France and there may be no obvious record of that.
Kind regards,
Alan
Reply from: Bill Henley
Date: Saturday 9th March 2013 at 10:09 AM

Very many thanks for the information. Harry's son is still alive and I shall share the details with him. It might even prompt some memory about any war service stories. I have a note by my grandfather that refers to him meeting his brother but not brothers. I think my father must have wrongly remembered the story about the meeting although even the chance meeting with one brother is interesting. I am very grateful to you. Bill Henley
Posted by: Pauline {Email left}
Location: Liverpool
Date: Thursday 7th March 2013 at 1:48 PM
Hi alan can you find out any information about david pagan no 41839 1st/6th bat, liverpool kings. killed in france 31/7/1917. thanks pauline.
Reply from: Alan Greveson
Date: Thursday 7th March 2013 at 6:48 PM

Dear Pauline,
No individual service record has survived for David Pagan so it is not possible to state his wartime service. An Army medal rolls index card recorded he qualified for the British War Medal and the Victory Medal. As he did not qualify for the 1914-15 Star for service overseas before December 31st 1915, he did not serve overseas until some date after January 1st 1916. His regimental number was a typical five-digit wartime-service number. He served in France with a Territorial Force battalion whose regimental numbers after March 1917 were six-digit numbers. Therefore, he had trained as a wartime recruit and had been posted to the 6th Battalion The King's (Liverpool Regiment) at some stage in 1916 or 1917. When he died he was serving with the 1st/6th King's Liverpool Regiment in the 165th Infantry Brigade in the 55th Division. "Soldiers Died in the Great War" (HMSO 1921) recorded David was killed in action on 31st July 1917. On that date, the 55th Division fought on the first day of the Battle of Pilckem Ridge in the Ypres salient. David has no marked grave and is commemorated on the Menin Gate memorial.
Kind regards,
Alan
Reply from: Pauline
Date: Thursday 7th March 2013 at 8:16 PM

Alan thanks for your swift reply, regards pauline

Posted by: Bill Henley {Email left}
Location: Stroud Gloucestershire
Date: Wednesday 6th March 2013 at 12:34 PM
Dear Alan, Your recommended book on the diehards is proving very helpful in researching the 1/8 Middlesex. My Grandfather Frederick Henley met with one of his brothers whilst at the front in Flanders/France. I think that this must have been Private Cyclist A Henley (Albert), 2067, 12 Div Cycle Company, Army Cycle Corps, British Expeditionary Force. Once again I would be extremely grateful for any advice on researching Albert. Many thanks. Bill Henley
Reply from: Alan Greveson
Date: Wednesday 6th March 2013 at 6:53 PM

Dear Bill,
There is no surviving individual service record for Albert Henley so it is not possible to state his wartime service in detail. An Army medal rolls index card showed he entered France on 31st May 1915 as Private Albert Henley 2067 of the Army Cyclist Corps. He qualified for the 1914-15 Star, the British War Medal and the Victory Medal. He was discharged on 21st May 1916. He was awarded a Silver War Badge for being discharged through sickness as no longer physically fit for war service. The war badge roll showed he had enlisted on 19th August 1914.
There is no reference to the 12th (Eastern) Division. The 12th Division did form up in France in June 1915 and fought at Loos in September 1915 and severe fighting at the Hohenzollern Redoubt in March 1916. See:
http://www.1914-1918.net/12div.htm

The war diary of 12 Division Cyclist Company is held at the National Archives at Kew in Catalogue piece WO95/1836/2. You would have to visit Kew to see it. The ACC was formed in 1908 from the cyclist battalions of the Territorial Force. Wartime cyclists were recruited in August 1914 and in 1915 the New Army divisions each had an ACC cyclist company employed as scouts, messengers and security patrols.
Kind regards,
Alan
Reply from: Bill Henley
Date: Wednesday 6th March 2013 at 9:36 PM

Dear Alan, Once again, very many thanks for your reply. The dates you give would have made it possible for Frederick to have met with his brother Albert near Fromelles on 21st July. I must find the opportunity to make it to Kew for further research of the war diary. Thank you. Bill Henley
Posted by: Jonboy {Email left}
Location: Harlow Essex
Date: Tuesday 5th March 2013 at 10:07 PM
Hi Alan
Not sure if you can help me on this one or not my second cousin twice removed John William Bartlett born 1893
in Mile End East London,Parents were John William Bartlett and Elizabeth Ford,married to Jane spilane on 09 03 1918.
i cant find any imfo on him regarding Military,i always thought they all went to war at his age at the time (18).
Many thanks
Jonboy
Reply from: Alan Greveson
Date: Wednesday 6th March 2013 at 6:52 PM

Dear Jonboy,
Unfortunately, there is no obvious surviving Army service record for John Bartlett born Mile End, 1893. There were 127 men in the Army medal rolls index who were named John Bartlett, but the index doesn't provide any biographical detail so it is not possible to identify him from that source. There were a similar number of men called John Bartlett in the Navy lists.
Kind regards,
Alan
Reply from: Jonboy
Date: Wednesday 6th March 2013 at 7:21 PM

Ok Alan thanks for looking for me.
Jonboy
Posted by: Wm Paul Davies {Email left}
Location: Regina Sask Canada
Date: Tuesday 5th March 2013 at 2:56 PM
Colleen Roberts
4 March 18:42
Hi Paul, just finished reading the information on our wonderful Grandfather.

Just a thought as I was looking at the page where it showed Grandad's name and medal entitlement. ( Roll of Individuals entitled to the Victory Medal . . .)

Did you notice on the same page that there was another Davies. Leonard Davies. Look at the service number they are close in number. Grandad had a nephew called Leonard Davies who also served in WW1. Leonard lied about his age to be able to join up, when he got to the trenches he met Grandad who had a fit at seeing him. Grandad reported Leonard as being underage and Leonard was send home only to join up again when he was old enough. I remember meeting Leonard Davies. I have not ever seen any photos of him.

Leonard Davies Sapper WW1 Royal Engineers
REGIMENTAL NUMBER: 112532

Mr, Greveson do you have any information on this individual?
Reply from: Wm Paul Davies
Date: Tuesday 5th March 2013 at 2:59 PM

Mr. Greveson in response to the kindness you've always shown I have made a donation to the Canadian Legion in your name - Kind Regards William Paul
Reply from: Alan Greveson
Date: Tuesday 5th March 2013 at 4:12 PM

Dear and Colleen,
Thank you for making a donation to the Canadian Legion - it makes it all worthwhile. Unfortunately, there is no surviving individual service record for 112532 Sapper Leonard Davies RE. However, his original attestation might have been under a different regiment and number. An Army medal rolls index card recorded he went to France on 26th August 1915 with the Royal Engineers. He survived the war. There is no biographical detail with that card so it is not possible to identify him further.
Kind regards,
Alan
Reply from: Alan Greveson
Date: Tuesday 5th March 2013 at 4:21 PM

Having looked at both medal cards for William B Davies and Leonard Davies, both men entered France on the same date: 26 August 1915. The closeness of their regimental numbers indicates the numbers were allotted at the the same time to men named "Davies". Therefore, they apparently served in the same unit would have known each other before going to France, so it is doubtful that Leonard Davies 112532 complies with the story that he met his grandfather in the trenches and was sent home. There were 97 men named Leonard Davies on the medal rolls.
Alan
Posted by: Martin {Email left}
Location: Guisborough
Date: Tuesday 5th March 2013 at 1:56 PM
Hello Alan
I am going to The Somme in June and taking a relative to his great uncles grave.
The soldier was L/Cpl S437 Michael Graham 10th or more likely13th Battalion The Rifle Brigade who apparently died of wounds on 26 May 1918 and is buried in Grave ii A 25.at Bagneux British Cemetery, Gezaincourt, Picardy, The Somme
I have tried searching the web but cant identify which action,day or where he was injured and unfortunately cant get to the Nat Archives.
Any ideas
Thanks for your time

Martin
Reply from: Alan Greveson
Date: Tuesday 5th March 2013 at 3:58 PM

Dear Martin,
Lance Corporal M Graham S437 Rifle Brigade was named Matthew Graham not Martin. No individual service record has survived for him so it is not possible to state his wartime service. The CWGC and "Soldiers Died in the Great War" (HMSO 1921) both recorded that on the day he died he was serving with the 13th Battalion Rifle Brigade. His date of entry into France appears to have coincided with the date the 10th Battalion landed in France but there is no other evidence for that. As he died of wounds at a casualty clearing station or in a hospital it is not possible to state when he was wounded. The 13th Battalion Rifle Brigade was part of 37th Division whose previous major engagement had been at the Battle of the Ancre on April 5th 1918 which was the final phase of the German Spring Offensive on the Somme.
The Bagneux Cemetery was created for the medical units based at Gezaincourt. The CWGC states: "At the end of March, the 3rd, 29th and 56th Casualty Clearing Stations had come to Gezaincourt where they were joined for a short time in April by the 45th CCS. They remained until September. The 3rd Canadian Stationary Hospital, in the citadel at Doullens, also buried in this cemetery in May and June 1918, and the 2nd Canadian Division in April and May.
The 13th Battalion's war diary is available to download (£3.36 charges apply) from the National Archives. See:
http://discovery.nationalarchives.gov.uk/SearchUI/Details?uri=C4555685

Kind regards,
Alan
Reply from: Martin
Date: Wednesday 6th March 2013 at 6:06 PM

That's brilliant Alan
I will research the Battle of the Ancre and also download the diary and see where that takes me.
I will let you know
Thanks you for your time

Kind regards

Martin
Reply from: Martin
Date: Thursday 21st March 2013 at 4:58 PM

Hi Alan

I have obtained the 13th Battalion war diary but it is sketchy and unfortunately around my period of interest there seemed to be a temporary diarist and he doesn't give any info directly regarding L/Cpl Graham.
It does let me know the villages south west of Doullens where he probably fought and was injured
I happy to send it to you for you to use if you get any any future queries
Cheers

Martin
Reply from: Alan Greveson
Date: Thursday 21st March 2013 at 6:25 PM

Dear Martin,
Thank you for the offer. There's no need to send it as I can direct inquiries to the National Archives website. I understand what you mean when it appears someone else has taken over the duties of keeping the diary and the level of detail deteriorates. However, the diaries were scribbled down by very tired officers when they got a chance to sort out the reams of paperwork and returns they were expected to deal with.
Kind regards,
Alan
Reply from: Martin
Date: Thursday 21st March 2013 at 11:09 PM

Alan

I respect your wishes

Thanks again

Martin
Posted by: Howard {Email left}
Location: Colchester
Date: Monday 4th March 2013 at 7:25 PM
I know my grandfather Charles Thomas Howard served in WW1 and I believe he must have served in the Essex Regiment as he was from Colchester. My grandmother once told me he had been a marksman and that he had signed up underage. I am wondering if there is any way I could trace his records? He sold his medals so we have no idea of his service number. His birth records and death records show his first and middle names reversed, so I'm thinking he probably did this when he signed up underage? Is there any hope? Thank you for any advice.
Reply from: Alan Greveson
Date: Monday 4th March 2013 at 8:07 PM

There isn't much hope without knowing his regimental number and regiment. It would be wrong to assume he served in the Essex Regiment. Essex provided its share of men for the others Corps of the Army as well as being a garrison town for many regiments during the war. The reversal of forenames is quite common in family records. The army identified a man by his surname; initials, regimental number and regiment. In general, only a man's individual service record contained a full name with sufficient biographical detail that can be used in a blind search. That detail would include his year of birth, which in this case would have been miss-stated. Therefore the only search criteria among the surviving records would be his parish of birth and his address at the time of his enlistment. His next of kin may have been identified. Only about 40 per cent of such records have survived, so you would be fortunate to find the relevant records but it is worth a search.
There are no immediately relevant surviving records for Thomas Charles Howard or Charles Thomas Howard, so searches would have to be made using both forenames on their own.
Kind regards,
Alan
Reply from: Howard
Date: Monday 4th March 2013 at 9:24 PM

Dear Alan,

Thank you so much for getting back to me so quickly and thank you for pointing out that he may well have been in another regiment.
I know his parish and address at the time of enlistment, as my family didn't move around much for many generations. Would I search the National Archives with that information?
Unfortunately my dad doesn't know or remember anything about his dad's service, but I am hopeful we may be able to find an old picture with something to go on, as I really don't want to give up the search.
I know he also served as an air raid warden during WW2, but I don't suppose there are records for them are there?
Thank you again for your great and quick response.
Reply from: Alan Greveson
Date: Monday 4th March 2013 at 9:38 PM

Dear Howard,
If you post the details of your grandfather I can have a look tomorrow and see if the records have survived. His date of birth might be useful just in case.
Kind regards,
Alan
Reply from: Howard
Date: Monday 4th March 2013 at 10:21 PM

Dear Alan,

Thank you so much for your kind offer.

He was actually born Thomas Charles Howard on the 11th June 1899 and he lived at Crockleford Heath in the Parish of Ardleigh in what was then Tendring District of Colchester, Essex. He was Charles Thomas Howard on his death certificate.

Thank you so very much.

My very best wishes.
Reply from: Howard
Date: Tuesday 5th March 2013 at 1:14 PM

Dear Alan,

I have just found out from my uncle that my grandfather was in the Buffs, which i hope will help narrow the search now. I looked it up on Wikipedia and found this bit of info which I found quite remarkable:

The two Howards

The Buffs obtained the name of "The Buffs" officially in 1744 while on campaign in the Low Countries. The 3rd Regiment was then under the command of Lieutenant-General Thomas Howard. At the same time, the 19th Regiment of Foot were commanded by their colonel, the Honourable Sir Charles Howard. In order to avoid confusion (because regiments were then named after their colonels, which would have made them both Howard's Regiment of Foot), the regiments took the colours of their facings as part of their names - the 19th Foot became the Green Howards, while the 3rd Foot became Howard's Buffs, eventually being shortened to simply The Buffs.

Thank you again for your kind assistance.
Reply from: Alan Greveson
Date: Tuesday 5th March 2013 at 4:00 PM

Unfortunately, no individual service record has survived for Thomas Howard. There is an Army medal rolls index card for a Thomas Howard who served in the East Kent Regiment (The Buffs). He qualified for the British War Medal and the Victory Medal. As he did not qualify for the 1914-15 Star for service overseas before December 31st 1915, he did not serve overseas until some date after January 1st 1916. There is no biographical information associated with the card so it is not possible to state that this card relates to your grandfather. It is not possible to say in which battalion of the Buffs he served so it is not possible to state his wartime service.
Kind regards,
Alan

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