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Alan Greveson's World War I Forum (Page 128)

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Posted by: Trish Phillips
Location: High Wycombe
Date: Wednesday 17th November 2010 at 10:50 AM
I am trying to find information about my maternal grandfather Sgt Major Bertram Stowe who was in the Ox & Bucks Light Infantry. I know he served during the second world war but that's all I know about him.
I would be grateful for any help you may be able to give me.
Reply from: Alan Greveson
Date: Wednesday 17th November 2010 at 4:10 PM

Dear Trish,
Records of soldiers who fought in the Second World War are still held by the Ministry of Defence.
The MoD will release certain amounts of information depending on whether you are next of kin or not. You can apply using the forms for next of kin, or with permission of next of kin, or as a general enquirer. See:
http://www.veterans-uk.info/service_records/service_records.html
You may need proof of death; date of birth; next of kin's permission unless you are the direct next of kin; a cheque and completed forms Part 1 and 2. The next of kin form (Part 1) is for completion by the next of kin of deceased service personnel (or enquirers with the consent of next of kin). Look for "Service records publications" under "Related pages" and follow the instructions. The Part 2 form is entitled: "Request forms for service personnel Army" found under "Related Pages". A cheque for GBP 30 should be made payable to "The MoD Accounting Officer" and sent to Army Personnel Centre Secretariat, Disclosures 2, Mail Point 515, Kentigern House, 65 Brown Street, Glasgow G2 8EX Scotland with all the paperwork.
Kind regards,
Alan
Reply from: Richard Stowe
Date: Tuesday 8th March 2011 at 2:34 PM

Hi Trish

My name is Richard Stowe and I am one of the sons of Bertram George Stowe.
He spent 24.5 years in the army, both in the Oxford & Bucks and for some time the Somersets. After leaving the Army he was the burser of the dragon school for boys in Oxford. He then worked for a building firm called Peedle Brothers where he worked untill his retirement at the age of 69. He was married twice and I am the eldest son from the second marriage. If you wish any further information you may get in touch by email and I'm sure either myself or another member of the family will try to help you. My email address is (compbuild at ntlworld dot com). Look forward to hearing from you.

regards

Richard.




Posted by: Yvonne Smith
Location: Oxford
Date: Wednesday 17th November 2010 at 10:45 AM
Would very much apprecite any info you can give me on my grandfather Pte Thomas Murray Haynes, No. 26857 who served with the Duke of Cornwall's Regiment during the !st world war. Have no other info on him so don't know if he survived or not.
Reply from: Alan Greveson
Date: Wednesday 17th November 2010 at 4:07 PM

Dear Yvonne,
Thomas Murray Haynes enlisted in the Duke of Cornwall's Light Infantry but he did not fight with them. He was born in Oxfordshire in the third quarter of 1889.
He enlisted under the Derby Scheme which was a last attempt to recruit volunteers before compulsory conscription was introduced in 1916. Under the scheme men could volunteer before a deadline of December 15th 1915 and be called up when required. Thomas volunteered at Warwick on December 11th 1915 and was called-up on March 15th 1916 at Budbrook. He joined the DCLI with the number 26857. On March 27th 1916 he was attached to the 3rd Battalion Somerset Light Infantry which was based at Devonport at the time. He was still cap-badged DCLI and probably joined the 12th Battalion DCLI which later went to France. Thomas was medically classified as Grade B II which meant he was able to walk five miles and see and hear sufficiently for ordinary purposes and could be employed on Lines of Communication in France. He apparently had poor eyesight and was probably not able to shoot a rifle.
No service record as such has survived for Thomas, but there are some notes which were compiled when he applied for a pension after the war.
They show he was transferred to the Labour Corps, with the number 93272, on May 5th 1917 and served with the 156th Company Labour Corps. He qualified for the British War Medal and the Victory Medal which indicates he served abroad. As the 3rd Bn Somerset Light Infantry did not serve abroad, his overseas service was probably with the Labour Corps. The Labour Corps was formed of men who were not able to join the infantry, and from men who had been wounded or were older. They worked on Lines of Communication which involved manual labour at any point between the docks and the front line.
The 156th Company Labour Corps was created from the 12th (Labour) Battalion the Duke of Cornwall's Light Infantry which was raised at Plymouth in 1916 and went to France to be Army Troops for the Fourth Army, in other words they were labourers at the disposal of Fourth Army. The 156th Company Labour Corps was created in April 1917. It is not possible to say exactly where they served. For more on the Labour Corps see:
http://www.labourcorps.co.uk/
On 6th December 1918 Thomas was sitting round a fire which had been lit in a field while the men were off duty. A grenade had been put in the fire and it exploded, injuring Thomas slightly in the left forearm. The incident was classed as an accident, although a Private Gough was blamed for putting the grenade in the fire and was deprived seven days' pay. Thomas was admitted to hospital at Rouen in France and then sent back to the UK to the Dundee War Hospital on December 17th 1918. He survived the war but was not granted a pension. He was discharged on February 11th 1919.
His record is available at the National Archives or via the Ancestry.co.uk website (charges apply). Some libraries provide free access to Ancestry.
Kind regards,
Alan


Posted by: Stephen Norrish {Email left}
Location: North Baddesley Hampshire
Date: Tuesday 16th November 2010 at 10:00 PM
Re previous message regarding Grandfather William Henry Norrish, Royal Garrison Artillery regiment number 56050, Medal card shows Victory and British medals awarded. Medal card reads Roll, RGA/247B or 8, page 14752. Rank, corporal.
I have received further details regarding his possible army service; his daughter contradicts several items of information regarding his enlistment, her recollection his he joined under age at 16 (1914) and served 12 years before being discharged, his service in India appears to be after WW1 not before. My aunt also confirms that he spent time in the glass house but when is unknown, she also believes he served in Salonika. Several jobs he did in the army was a farrier and a cook. The 1911 census shows he lived in Southampton.
Reply from: Alan Greveson
Date: Wednesday 17th November 2010 at 1:33 PM

Dear Stephen,
If William Norrish served 12 years after 1914 his service record is probably still held by the UK Ministry of defence.
The MoD will release certain amounts of information depending on whether you are next of kin or not. You can apply using the forms for next of kin, or with permission of next of kin, or as a general enquirer. See:
http://www.veterans-uk.info/service_records/service_records.html
You may need proof of death; date of birth; next of kin's permission unless you are the direct next of kin; a cheque and completed forms Part 1 and 2. The next of kin form (Part 1) is for completion by the next of kin of deceased service personnel (or enquirers with the consent of next of kin). Look for "Service records publications" under "Related pages" and follow the instructions. The Part 2 form is entitled: "Request forms for service personnel Army" found under "Related Pages". A cheque for GBP 30 should be made payable to "The MoD Accounting Officer" and sent to Army Personnel Centre Secretariat, Disclosures 2, Mail Point 515, Kentigern House, 65 Brown Street, Glasgow G2 8EX Scotland with all the paperwork.

Kind regards
Alan


Posted by: Kath {Email left}
Location: Leicestershire
Date: Tuesday 16th November 2010 at 9:06 PM
Hi i am desperate to find any information whatsoever of my great grandad who died in france during world war 1. i am eager to find as much info as poss as my father has early onset of outsimers and would like to create a portfolio for him.
the details i have are
james henry ford
9th batalion north staffs regimnet.
no: 16299
died 8/1/1916 as a private and burried at pommier communal cemetry.
i know my dad is always talking about a medel (cross) he was awarded as he was the first person from the battalion to be killed? or something along these lines.
please please help as this would make my father very happy
many thanks
kath
Reply from: Alan Greveson
Date: Wednesday 17th November 2010 at 1:00 PM

Dear Kath,
Many young men lied about their ages so they could join the army in the First World War. James Henry Ford lied about his age when he enlisted because he was too old to qualify.
When he volunteered at Stoke on Trent on Monday, January 4th 1915, he stated his aged was 37 years and eight months. A search of the pre-war England census returned no match for such a man and there was no record of a birth in Staffordshire in 1877. Broadening the search over ten years returned one result for the birth of a James Henry Ford at Wolstanton in the first quarter of 1873 (GRO Births Q1 1873 Wolstanton, Staffs, vol 6b page 102).
This man appeared in the 1901 census as James H Ford, coal miner, aged 27, of Silverdale, Staffordshire; married to Mary aged 23, with a son named John Arthur Ford, aged seven months, who was born at Silverdale (John Arthur was born 21 August 1900). They were living at 29 Ford Street, Silverdale with Mary's father James and his son George Nelson Ford (RG13/2587 folio 43 page 31).
James Henry Ford had married Mary Ford in the first quarter of 1900 at the Elim Chapel, Wolstanton, on 10th March 1900 (GRO Marriages Q1 1900 Wolstanton, vol 6b page 197). The couple had a second son, Leonard, born 5th Feb 1902. Mary Ford died in the second quarter of 1910 (GRO Deaths Q2 1910 Wolstanton vol 6b page 49).
In the pre-war census James Henry Ford was shown as a widower, aged 38, an ironstone miner, living at 37 Chapel Street, Silverdale with his sons, Leonard and John Arthur. He was a widower.

On Monday, January 4th 1915, John Henry Ford who gave his address as 37 Chapel Street, Silverdale, Staffordshire, volunteered to join the army. He described himself as a collier [miner], a widower, aged 37 years and eight months. His next of kin was his brother-in-law, Nelson Ford of Ford Street, Silverdale. He was actually 42 years old. At the time, the maximum age limit for enlistment was set at 38 years. It was raised to 40 years on 18th May 1915 to boost recruitment and was finally set at 41 years in January 1916. John was slightly stocky, at 5ft 4ins with a 42 inch chest and a weight of 11 stone. He was passed medically fit at Newcastle under Lyme the day he enlisted and was sent to the depot of the North Staffordshire Regiment at Lichfield. He remained at the depot with the other recruits for 10 days until he was posted, on January 14th 1915, to the 9th Battalion North Staffordshire Regiment which was then based at Hastings. The 9th Battalion had been raised from wartime volunteers and while it was training it had been employed on coastal defences in case of invasion. On March 20th 1915 the Battalion moved to Hastings and then proceeded to Windmill Hill on Salisbury Plain on April 10th 1915, the week after Easter. The various moves were to accommodate the different kinds of training...individual recruit training; company training; battalion training; brigade manoeuvres and divisional preparation. In June 1915 the 9th Battalion had completed training with the 37th Division which was inspected by King George V at Sidbury Hill on the 25th June. On 22 July 1915 the Division began to cross the English Channel and the 9th Battalion North Staffordshire Regiment sailed to France from Southampton to Le Havre on July 28th 1915 to fight with the 37th Division.
The 9th Battalion North Staffordshire Regiment had trained as a fighting infantry battalion but its role had altered by the time it arrived in France. It became the Pioneer Battalion for the 37th Division. The Pioneers were both soldiers and labourers tasked to help the Division's Royal Engineers with all the construction work required for building defences, strong points, river crossings and so on. All soldiers had some degree of manual labour involved in trench warfare, but the Pioneers specialised in it. When necessary, the Pioneers had to fight as infantrymen, as reflected by the fact that in 1917 Sergeant John Carmichael of the 9th Battalion was awarded the Victoria Cross.
James was twice the age of the average recruit and would probably have been a father figure to many of his colleagues. He had a fifteen year old son. As a former miner, he would have been efficient at digging.
James's battalion travelled by train from Le Havre to Watten. From there they marched to St. Sylvestre-Cappel near Hazebrouck. From there to Bailleul. By August 18th 1915, they had arrived at Le Bizet near Armentieres where the Division went into trenches for the first time to be instructed in trench warfare. At the end of August the Division moved South by train to Halloy near the border of Picardy. There they were inspected by the Army Commander. The reason for the move was to relieve the French of the trenches in the front line at Hannescamps. There were numerous digging parties formed, to improve the trenches and to create the communication trenches that weaved back towards the billets at Hannescamps and Humbercamps. The sector was generally quiet at that time and there was much digging to be done. By December the weather had turned very wet and windy and trenches became "waist deep in liquid mud, most of them fallen-in owing to very wet weather." By December 15th 1915 the British and enemy artillery was active. Hannescamps and Bienvillers-au-Bois were heavily shelled by the enemy.
James must have been granted leave at New Year 1916 as his record showed his second marriage was on January 2nd 1916 to Mary Louise Whitehall at St Luke's Silverdale. He died six days later.
It is not possible to say how James died, but there was certainly some shelling of the villages in the area on the 8th January 1916 when James was "killed in action". He was 43. He is buried at the village (commune) cemetery at Pommier near Humbercamps. See
http://www.cwgc.org/search/cemetery_photos.aspx?cemetery=26513&mode=1
James qualified for the 1914-15 Star, the Victory Medal and the British War Medal.

The war diary of the 9th Battalion North Staffordshire Regiment is held at the UK National Archives in Catalogue reference WO 95/ 2524. A service record is available from the National Archives or from the Ancestry.co.uk website (charges apply). Some libraries provide free access to the Ancestry website.
Kind regards,
Alan
Reply from: Kath
Date: Thursday 18th November 2010 at 9:55 AM

This is fantastic, thanks you so so much for this information. i look forward to now searching for photos and other memrobilia. unfortunatly the cross that he was awarded has gone missing over the past 15 years so i will forever be on the hunt for this and his other medal. i really apreciate your time and will gratefully make a donation to the course.
many thanks once again.
kath
Reply from: Louise
Date: Sunday 5th January 2014 at 12:43 PM

Hi Kath, My Great Grandad writes about your Great Grandad in his war diary and I have been tying to find living descendants of James Henry Ford for months now. My Great Grandad was Lance Corporal Walter Davis No 11666 of the 9th Battalion North Staffordshire Regiment. He witnessed your Great Grandads death and helped bury him in Pommier France. He Writes;

"We were digging a trench within 200yds of the Boche front, time when we lost about six wounded. A few days later I lost one of my best men in the section, Poor Jim Ford, a good living man and always a willing worker. He got hit working in the village with a nose cap of a shell. we buried him with full military honour and put a beautiful cross to mark the spot which I know is there today.'

I have done some research into 'Poor Jim Ford' and found the following;

He was born in Silverdale Staffordshire and was around about 37 when war broke out in 1914. Then he lived at 37 Chapel Street Silverdale with his two sons Leonard, born on 5th Feb 1902 in Silverdale and John Arthur born on 21st Aug 1900 in Wolstanton. Their mother Mary had sadly passed away. James re-married during war to a lady called Mary Louisa Whitehall on 2nd Jan 1916 at St Lukes Church Silverdale and his wife and two sons moved into 23 Vale Street Staffordhsire for the duration of the war.

At the time of enlistment, Ford had two brothers, Allen Ford aged 60 and George William Ford 55. He also had one sister Martha Ellen aged 53.

If you go on Ancestry.co.uk you can find all of his official war documents e.g. medical history, next of kin records, official letters to his wife after he died, his wife's pension letters etc. There are about 23 documents you can view and print off.

I am a masters student and create works of art out of glass. I am at the moment using these war documents to create a piece of work about James Henry Ford, a sort of commemorative piece out of glass based on what I know from these documents (Hence why I'm looking for descendants, I thought it would be nice to share with you). He obviously meant a lot to my Great Grandad as he was the only person he spoke of personally in his diary.

If you have any other information or photographs of him and family in particular this would be really useful for my work and of general interest to myself. I can send you photos of his commemorative work too in a few weeks when its completed. Thank you Louise x


Posted by: Paul {Email left}
Location: Belfast
Date: Tuesday 16th November 2010 at 8:14 PM
Dear Alan,

I have just came across your site and was wondering if you could help me find out more about my great grandfather Alexander Bennett (Frome Street-East Belfast). I have just found his medal rolls and am finding it difficult to understand them. From my research I think he was a driver in the 7th field company Royal Engineers (WW1). Some information also links him to the Grenadier Guards. From his Medal Rolls I think he received the Victory, British and 1915 Star medals and the Silver War badge. Could you possibly tell me what battles he was involved in and where and how he was wounded? Can you also please tell me when he was discharged? We know he died young, maybe because of his wounds? I know it's a lot to ask but I would be very grateful for any help.

Thank you,
Paul
Reply from: Alan Greveson
Date: Tuesday 16th November 2010 at 9:02 PM

Dear Paul,
Looking at the Medal Rolls index it would appear you are referring to at least two different people called Alexander Bennett. One served in the 7th Field Company Royal Engineers as no. 21422. He earned the 1914 Star the Victory Medal and the British War Medal. Another soldier served in the Grenadier Guards and then transferred to the Royal Engineers with a new number that was of a type issued after March 1918. He earned the Victory Medal and the British War medal. Neither of these men earned the 1914-15 Star or qualified for the Silver War Badge.
The Medal Rolls Index cards do not normally identify a soldier other than by name, rank and number so it is important you identify from other sources the regiment and regimental number of your great-grandfather.
You may be able to find him in the First World War army service records which are online at the Ancestry website (charges apply). Some libraries provide free access to the website. You would need to be able to identify him by his parish and year of birth or his place of residence when he enlisted. Most First World War service records have been destroyed, but it is a starting point if you do not have any information at home that identifies his regimental number.
Kind regards,
Alan
Reply from: Paul
Date: Tuesday 16th November 2010 at 11:20 PM

Dear Alan,

Thanks for getting back to me so quickly. When I went on to the National Archives last week with the information that I had, I obtained 6 cards and now I am unsure if it is 6 different Alexander Bennetts. I am a bit confused. One of them has a regimental number 21422 like you said. The story in the family was that he was a driver in the RE and that he was wounded but none of the cards seem to fit this story. If 21422 is him, and he wasn't wounded, if possible do you know what battles he was at and when he was discharged?

Thanks again for your help.

Paul
Reply from: Alan Greveson
Date: Wednesday 17th November 2010 at 1:28 PM

Dear Paul,
The National Archives downloads do have index cards for six different soldiers on each page.
It is still not possible to be certain which unit Alexander Bennett served in, as there were at least two men named Alexander Bennett whose medal cards showed they were drivers in the Royal Engineers. One served with the 7th Field Company and the other served with the 26th Field Company.
A medal index card does not further identify a soldier and nor does it necessarily show he was wounded. The Silver War Badge was issued to men who were discharged from the army for wounds. Men who were wounded and continued to serve had a stripe sewn onto their left sleeve.

The 26th field Company RE served with 1st Division. See:
http://www.1914-1918.net/1div.htm
The 7th Field Company served in France as well. See:
http://www.reubique.com/7fc.htm

You still need further evidence to show which, if either, of these men is your great grandfather. Both these men went to France in August 1914, so they would have been regular soldiers. No service record appears to have survived for them.
Kind regards
Alan
Reply from: Paul
Date: Thursday 18th November 2010 at 6:31 PM

Dear alan,

i really appreciate you taking the time to help me.thanks for the information and advice.


Posted by: Brianj {Email left}
Location: North Shields Tyne Wear
Date: Tuesday 16th November 2010 at 8:04 PM
Hi,
I am trying to find out more information about my granfather. His name was Fred Johnson (not Frederick)
He was born in July 1888 in Hunslet (a small town south of Leeds)
He joined the 2nd Batallion of the West Yorkshire Regiment in 1908 (his regimental number was 8864)
When the First World war broke out he was stationed in Malta and had seen service with the international peace keeping force in Albania in 1913.
The battalion returned home and were sent to France on 4th November 1914. He was wounded in the knee somtime between then and July 1915 when he was sent to Gilsland Spa for Convalescence (this comes from family information). His daughter was born in April 1916 (thats how I worked out the July 1915!). My grand mother, Margaret Jane Elliott, worked at the Orchard House hotel in Gilsland (this info is from my deceased uncle-Fred and Margarets son). Margaret Jane was born in Morpeth, but I believe she was living in Gateshead at this time.
Fred was sent back to the front and was given compassionate leave to get married in December 1917.
He was discharged from the army 0n 3/6/1920 (he was a Lance Sergeant )
- I have his discharge papers and medals. He was then a reserve until 1927.
He was also called up into the DLI in the second world war but saw no action.
I was wondering if anyone had any tips on where to search for information. I have tried the following without much success:
- National Archives: I have a copy of his medal card but his service records must have been destroyed in the second world war as there is no sign of them.
- Gilsland Spa records - they dont hold the records any more and I believe they may be in Carlisle record office which is closed until next year - I have not found them to be very helpful!
- I have bought a book of his regiment (the West Yorkshire Regiment) which gives very detailed information of the regiments time in the trenches but contains only officers names and soldiers who were killed (neither of which applies to him)
-I have searched for pension records but to no avail.

Some of the things I would like to do is find out is if he was treated locally (in Newcastle say) before going to Gilsland - did he actually meet my grandmother in Newcastle and not Gilsland?
I would like to find out when he was sent back to the trenches which would enable me to find out which battles he was involved in (he spent at least three years in the trenches - and survived!)

Any tips or pointers would be most welcome

Brian


Posted by: Elaine {Email left}
Location: Southend On Sea
Date: Tuesday 16th November 2010 at 4:45 PM
I have just been extremely lucky having 'found' and bought back my Great Grandfathers WW1 Medals. Now I would like to find out more about his time served in the Great War. I had already found the Medal Card details on a rare trip to Kew many years ago.
His name is George Thomas Sisterson born 1883 and he was a GNR in the RFA No 32135, then he became a PTE in the North'd Fus. No 43873. His date of entry is shown as 15-03-15 and he was also awarded the Silver War Badge.
He died in 1933 and his death certificate showed him as an Army Disabled Pensioner who committed suicide whilst in a depressed state of mind.
I have been told (but have no proof) that he was a Gunner at the Battle of Messines and was one of only 4 survivors in his group and as he was a Geordie that is why is was then attached to the Northumberland Fusilliers and fought at the 3rd Battle of Ypres which is where he got wounded in the leg.
How can I find out if this is true and possibly more.
Reply from: Alan Greveson
Date: Tuesday 16th November 2010 at 6:37 PM

Dear Elaine,
No service record appears to have survived for George Sisterson. Without knowing which specific units he served in it is not possible to suggest his war time history. It is possible, but not certain, that his entry on the actual medal rolls may indicate his unit. The rolls are held at the National Archives at Kew. His qualification for the 1914-15 Star is on page 273 of Medal Roll O/1/5C which is in Catalogue reference WO 329/2625 "Northumberland Fusiliers other ranks: medal rolls. O/1/5C; O/1/11C-O/1/11C9. Pages 232C-429C. 1914-15 Star"
His qualification for the British War and Victory Medals are on page 4899 of Medal Roll O/1/105B223 which is in Catalogue reference WO 329/700 "Northumberland Fusiliers other ranks: medal rolls O/1/105B23; O/1/105B24. Pages 4849-5151. British War Medal and Victory Medal."
Kind regards,
Alan
Reply from: Elaine
Date: Thursday 23rd December 2010 at 10:47 AM

Hi Alan

I have now obtained copies of the actual medal rolls as you suggested thanks and there is good and bad news! The 1914/15 Star Roll indicates that he served with Unit 121 in the RFA as a Gnr but the British War & Victory Medal Roll does not show which unit of the Northumberland Fusiliers he served with. But I suppose one out of two is better than none!
Does this help in any way?
Merry Christmas
Elaine
Reply from: Alan Greveson
Date: Friday 24th December 2010 at 5:25 PM

Dear Elaine,
121 Brigade Royal Field Artillery served with the 38th (Welsh) Division in France and Flanders. The Division fought at Mametz Wood during the Battle of the Somme 1916. In 1917 it fought at the Battle of Pilckem Ridge (31 July - 2 August 1917) and The Battle of Langemarck (16th -18th August 1917) which were both part of the Third Battle of Ypres. The Battle of Messines Ridge was fought between 7th and 17th June 1917, also part of the Third Battle of Ypres. The preparatory artillery bombardment started on May 21st 1917.
Without having a date for his transfer to the Northumberland Fusiliers it is not clear who he was with when he was involved in the Third Battle of Ypres.
The war diary of the 121 Brigade RFA is held at the National Archives at Kew, London, in Catalogue reference WO 95/2546.
Kind regards,
Alan


Posted by: Carl Beeson {Email left}
Location: Plymouth
Date: Tuesday 16th November 2010 at 4:00 PM
Further to my last message, he was in the 10th Sherwood Foresters.


Posted by: Carl Beeson {Email left}
Location: Plymouth
Date: Tuesday 16th November 2010 at 3:59 PM
I am researching my great uncle, William E Wilson, of Bestwood, Notts. Killed 3 March 1916, his name is on the Menin Gate, so I know that he does not have a grave. Can you give me any information as to where he died please?
Reply from: Alan Greveson
Date: Tuesday 16th November 2010 at 6:22 PM

Dear Carl,
The 10th Bn Sherwod Foresters were in trenches in the area of Chester Farm and Woodcote House on the road from Zillebeke to Voormezeele near Ypres on March 3rd 1916. The area was known as "The Bluff". The 10th Battalion served with the 51st Infantry Brigade of the 17th Division. At 4 a.m. on March 2nd the brigade made on attack on the enemy trenches with the 10th Sherwood Foresters successfully taking an enemy trench which they held throughout the 3rd March. They were relieved by 3.45 a.m. on March 4th having lost 17 men killed.
The war diary of the 10th Battalion can be downloaded from the UK National Archives website. It is with other diaries in Catalogue reference WO 95/2008.
Kind regards,
Alan
Reply from: Carl Beeson
Date: Wednesday 17th November 2010 at 10:20 AM

Many thanks Alan for that, as a member of the R.B.L. do not worry as a donation will be put in the collecting box. I now know where to look when next in Belgium.


Posted by: Helen Warwick {Email left}
Location: Birmingham
Date: Tuesday 16th November 2010 at 3:46 PM
My grandmother's cousin, Charles Inkerman Bacon, was reported missing as a private (no 11350) from the 1st Batallion, Kings royal Rifles in France on the 15th May 1915. Are you able to say where the regiment was on that date and was the year's gap before he was officially dead normal? (see the letters on his service record).
Reply from: Alan Greveson
Date: Tuesday 16th November 2010 at 5:11 PM

Dear Helen,
Charles Bacon served in France with the 1st Battalion King's Royal Rifle Corps from November 29th 1914. He was reported missing on 15th/16th May 1915. This was the army's way of describing events that happened at night-time across the night of the 15th May into the morning of 16th May. A Medal Rolls Index card for C.I. Bacon showed he was "acc as dead" which meant "accepted as dead".
After an engagement with the enemy a battalion would take a roll call and would list the men who had been killed; those who had been wounded and those who were missing.
The missing included men who had been taken prisoner by the enemy; those who were lying wounded in the battlefield and may have returned or been found later and also those whose bodies were never found because they lay on ground that was later shelled. Some men reported missing did eventually turn up. It took the Red Cross some time to inform the British War Office of men who had been taken prisoner. This process may have taken some months, consequently the War Office, having informed the family a man was missing, would wait some months before accepting that he was not being held as a prisoner of war and was, in fact, dead. That is why Charles Bacon was not accepted as dead until March 30th 1916. It was the standard practice of the time.
The 1st Bn King's Royal Rifle Corps were involved in an attack on the enemy's trenches on the night of May 15th 1915. They had been billeted for a few days in the village of Lecoutre (La Couture) near Richebourg and returned to the trenches on May 13th near the Richebourg St Vaast Road and Rue de Bois. On May 15th they were to attack the enemy breastworks at night, in the area of Ferme du Bois, with the intention of holding the position until dawn, when reserves would be pushed forward. The distance to the enemy position was about 350 yards. The move started about 9 p.m. "there was no moon and the night was pretty dark", according to Major Armytage who wrote a report on the attack later (National Archives, WO 95/1358). The KRRC held the enemy position from midnight on the 15th throughout the next day and were relieved from it at 2 a.m. on the 17th May. At roll call 26 had been killed; 193 wounded and 88 were missing.
The war diary of the 1st KRRC gives a full account of the incident. It can be downloaded from the UK National Archives Documents Online website. It is among the diaries of the 6th Infantry Brigade in Catalogue reference WO 95/1358.
Charles is commemorated on Le Touret memorial to the Missing.
Kind regards,
Alan


Posted by: Jenny {Email left}
Location: Melton Mowbray Leicestershire
Date: Tuesday 16th November 2010 at 3:18 PM
I am trying to trace which battle my Grandfather was involved in when he was very badly wounded.His Medal records show that he arrived in France on 29/7/1915 with The Leicestershire Reg.Thats the only info I have.
Any help would be great.
Thanks


Posted by: Stephen Norrish {Email left}
Location: North Baddesley Hampshire
Date: Tuesday 16th November 2010 at 2:53 PM
Can anyone please help, i am trying to trace my grandfathers military years before and during WW1. the following details i believe are correct. Name William Henry Norrish, Born Sheerness, Kent 1898. enlisted underage before WW1, posted to India, Royal Garrison Artillery regiment number 56050, Medal card shows Victory and British medals awarded. medal card reads Roll, RGA/247B or 8, page 14752. rank, corporal

my grandfather never spoke to me about the great war so the rest i have gleaned is from my older brother.
upon being recalled to England from India posible1914-15 he and several others we sentenced to 18 months hard labour for refusing to go to france as they had not been paid (unable to prove this). Fought in Belgium after release, dates unkown, his daughter recalls that he aslo may has served in Salonika. could he have been part of the 28th Division?


Posted by: Tony Leary
Location: Handforth Cheshire
Date: Tuesday 16th November 2010 at 12:46 AM
Hello again .
I am trying to trace on behalf of my cousin In Ireland . For. John Power .
His Fathers Army record .
His was Rifleman . No 7006377 .
John Joseph Power. Born 1896 died 1972 .
Enlisted In 24th 1915 . Into the Royal Irish Rifles .
He was In the army Upto 1922. Demobbed in Cairo .
Was awarded The 1914/15 Star . Victory. General service & Clasp Iraq . Medals .
Q) What battalion was he In .
Q) Did he fight In france .
And any other information will be accepted .
yours Sincerly .
Tony Leary .
Reply from: Alan Greveson
Date: Tuesday 16th November 2010 at 1:37 PM

Dear Tony,
It is not possible to identify John Joseph Power. There were some eight men called John Power who served with the Royal Irish Rifles in the First World War. As John Power had a post-war regimental number of seven digits and served up to 1922 his service record may still be held by the UK Ministry of Defence.
The MoD will release certain amounts of information depending on whether you are next of kin or not. You can apply using the forms for next of kin, or with permission of next of kin, or as a general enquirer. See:
http://www.veterans-uk.info/service_records/service_records.html
You may need proof of death; date of birth; next of kin's permission unless you are the direct next of kin; a cheque and completed forms Part 1 and 2. The next of kin form (Part 1) is for completion by the next of kin of deceased service personnel (or enquirers with the consent of next of kin). Look for "Service records publications" under "Related pages" and follow the instructions. The Part 2 form is entitled: "Request forms for service personnel Army" found under "Related Pages". A cheque for GBP 30 should be made payable to "The MoD Accounting Officer" and sent to Army Personnel Centre Secretariat, Disclosures 2, Mail Point 515, Kentigern House, 65 Brown Street, Glasgow G2 8EX Scotland with all the paperwork.
Kind regards
Alan
Reply from: Tony Leary
Date: Tuesday 16th November 2010 at 11:45 PM

Hello Alan .
Many thanks for your quick responce.
I have passed on all the relevant Information .
To my Cousin John Power .
Advising him to apply to the Mod . As he Is the direct decendant.
Yours Sincerly .
Tony Leary


Posted by: Tony Leary {Email left}
Location: Handforth Cheshire
Date: Tuesday 16th November 2010 at 12:30 AM
Hello .I am trying to trace ,my Grandfathers war record. ( James WillIam Leary .Born 1879. Died 1941. ) And battalion .
He was In the Royal Irish Rifles 1915/1917. His No was 7/8433 . We believe he served In France . Was Awarded .
The Star medal. Victory. & General service medal .
Yours Sincerly .
Tony Leary .
Reply from: Alan Greveson
Date: Tuesday 16th November 2010 at 1:25 PM

Dear Tony,
James Leary, 7/8433 would have served with the 7th Battalion Royal Irish Rifles. No service record has survived for him. A Medal Rolls index card showed he entered France on 22nd December 1915 which was the date the 7th Battalion entered France. In September 1915 they had moved from Ballyhooly to Aldershot and trained with the 48th Infantry Brigade in the 16th (Irish) Division. The Division fought on the Somme in 1916 at The Battle of Guillemont in which the Division captured the village itself and at the The Battle of Ginchy. It then moved North and fought at The Battle of Messines on 1917 and the Battle of Langemark, part of the Third Battles of Ypres 1917.
On August 23rd 1917, the 7th Battalion RIR moved to the 49th Infantry Brigade in the 16th Division and then moved to the 108th Brigade in the 36th (Ulster) Division on October 14th 1917. A month later the battalion merged with the 2nd Battalion Royal Irish Rifles at Ypres on November 13th 1917. On 8th February 1918 the 2nd Battalion then joined the 107th Brigade in the 36th Division.
In 1918 the 36th Division fought at the Battle of St Quentin on the Somme and subsequently at The Actions at the Somme Crossings and The Battle of Rosieres. It then fought at The Battle of Messines (1918); The Battle of Bailleul; The First Battle of Kemmel Ridge; The Battle of Ypres; The Battle of Courtrai and the action of Ooteghem. At the Armistice the 36th Division was at Mouscron, near Tourcoing and was demobilised by 29th June 1919.
Reply from: Tony Leary
Date: Tuesday 16th November 2010 at 11:58 PM

Hello Alan.
Thank you kindly for your swift reply .
The Information you have disclosed about my grandfather. Was very Indept ,regards to his and his regiments movement . And battles fought and deployed In .
It has painted a clear picture for me, and given me valuable historical data . That I can Install Into my family tree .And family history .
May I thank you once again .For your wonderful dedication and help and assistance In this matter.
Regards .
Tony Leary.


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