Alan Greveson's World War 1 Forum (Page 128)

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Posted by: Elaine {Email left}
Location: New South Wales
Date: Tuesday 7th February 2012 at 8:03 AM
I have some more information on Thomas Edward Smith he was in the boer war and engaged for 5 years in the A.I.F. (X L.H) 10th light horse regiment and served withe V.C. winner (simpson). This might help a little more..regards elaine
Reply from: Alan Greveson
Date: Tuesday 7th February 2012 at 2:50 PM

Dear Elaine,
It is not possible to positively identify a Thomas Smith without knowing his place and date of birth or address. If you have that information to uniquely identify him, you will find his records by name at:
http://www.naa.gov.au/collection/explore/defence/service-records/index.aspx

Kind regards,
Alan
Reply from: Elaine
Date: Wednesday 8th February 2012 at 12:02 AM

Good morning Alan thank you very much for your reply to my email...today I am going to look in the web site you sent to me regarding the australian gov collecction and see what I can find...I can also give you the place where he was born which is Gawler South Australia year of birth 1884 this is all I have...Thank you once again for your patience with me...regards Elaine
Posted by: Elaine {Email left}
Location: New South Wales
Date: Tuesday 7th February 2012 at 7:49 AM
Hi I am trying to find information about Thomas Edward Smith who enlisted in 1916 and went to egypt...everywhere i turn i come up with an end to nothing...he enlisted in south australia and was in the light horse...i hope you can help regards elaine
Posted by: Mel {Email left}
Location: Cleethorpes
Date: Monday 6th February 2012 at 10:13 PM
Dear Alan
I wonder if any more information can be found on my grandad George Thomas Drew, his enlistment date was 1.9.14 and discharged 28.8.19. His reason for discharge was sick 392 (xvia) Regiment number 840300 (Gunner) C/336 Brigade Number 446. He returned from war to marry my grandma on 23 Nov. 1915. He often spoke of the miserable conditions at the Somme waist deep in mud. I understand at some point he was punished and flogged tied to a wheel of a cannon. He slept alongside his horse, which he spoke fondly of. My sister said he had shell shock for a time. I have a wedding photo of the day they married and a medal the 1914-15 star. He spent some time in Mesopotamia. It would be fascinating to find out more about his time in the war during his time with the RFA but I do not seem to find out any more information.
Mel
Reply from: Alan Greveson
Date: Tuesday 7th February 2012 at 2:51 PM

Dear Mel,
No individual service record appears to have survived for George Thomas Drew so it is not possible to suggest with which units of the Royal Artillery he served. So many batteries were disbanded and re-organised at various stages in the war it is not possible to trace a man's movements without an individual record.
Kind regards,
Alan
Posted by: Karen Gill {Email left}
Location: Doncaster
Date: Monday 6th February 2012 at 4:47 PM
Hi Alan,

Added info to my earlier post, Wilfred Wilby Newton was born in 1893/94 Pontefract District and lived in Whitwood Yorkshire. Thought you were a mind reader for a moment, sorry.

Karen
Reply from: Alan Greveson
Date: Monday 6th February 2012 at 10:20 PM

Dear Karen,
This is the same question that was asked on 25th January. There are no surviving records that uniquely identify Wilfred Newton born at Whitwood or Pontefract in 1893/4.
Kind regards
Alan
Posted by: Karen Gill {Email left}
Location: Doncaster
Date: Monday 6th February 2012 at 4:12 PM
Hello Alan,

I have contacted you before and received some really useful information on two of my great uncles from ww1, but I had some information myself to give you on them. I cannot find any info on my third great uncle though, His name is Wilfred Wilby Newton, he was the middle brother of David Wilby Newton and Clarence Wilby Newton, although sometimes Wilby was not on any paperwork. I have checked the National Roll of Honor for the dead but he does'nt appear to be on that. I have no other info, is it possible you could find out if he was in the war and what regiment he served in? I would then have the details of all three brothers, my great uncles.

Many thanks.

Karen
Posted by: Ann {Email left}
Location: Petts Wood
Date: Monday 6th February 2012 at 10:00 AM
Hello Alan
I am helping a friend find out about her grandfather
James Arthur Pegrum
Discharged from the army March 1917 and his address was to be The Star and Garter, Richmond, Surrey.
His number was 7517 Private 21st London TF. He did live in the British Legion flats in Fulham.
Is there any way we can find out what actually happened to him to leave him unable to carry on. I know he was wheelchair bound.
Thank you
Ann
Reply from: Alan Greveson
Date: Monday 6th February 2012 at 7:03 PM

Dear Ann,
James Arthur Pegrum (sometimes spelled Pegram) was born March 5th 1886 at Chiswick, the son of Charles and Mary Pegrum. The surname is probably a derivative of "Pilgrim". James was baptised on April 25th 1886 at Turnham Green, Hounslow. In the 1901 census he was shown as a page-boy in the service of a Scots physician, William Holmes, at Old Burlington Street, Westminster. In the 1911 census he was lodging in central London and was a theatre employee. He was described on enlistment as an assistant electrician.
James enlisted in the army under the Derby Scheme, which allowed men who had not yet joined up to volunteer at the end of 1915, just before compulsory conscription was introduced. They would then be called up when required. James enlisted on 24th November 1915 with the 3/19th (third-nineteenth) Battalion London Regiment. This was a training battalion. He was sent home the same day and was called up on March 3rd 1916 at Whitehall. The 3/19th Battalion was based at Winchester at the time. After a short period of training as a rifleman James was sent to France on 4th July 1916 to serve with the 1/19th Battalion London Regiment as part of a draft of reinforcements. A short period of time would have been spent at a base depot in France and James was eventually posted to serve with the 21st Battalion London Regiment. The reason for the change would have been to reinforce battalions that needed to be brought up to fighting strength. He joined the 21st Battalion on 20th July 1916 while they were taking turns in the front line trenches in the Souchez sector in front of Villers-au-Bois, north of Arras. In August the battalion marched to the rear through Remaisnil, Bernatre and St Riquier to Lahoussoye (ten miles north-east of Amiens) where they spent much of August on training exercises and on rifle ranges. On 10th September they moved to the town of Albert en route for the battlefields of the Somme.
The 21st Battalion London regiment served with the 142nd Infantry Brigade with the 47th Division.
The Brigade marched to Mametz Wood on September 11th 1916; Bazentin-le-Petit on the 13th September and arrive in front of High Wood (Bois des Fourcaux) on the 14th September. On 16th September 1916 they took part in an attack on High Wood which became known as part of the Battle of Flers-Courcelette (15th to 22nd September 1916). The weather was wet on the 16th and 17th and became "fair" by the 19th. The 47th Division succeeded in capturing High Wood, but with heavy losses. The attack on the positions known as "Cough Drop" continued until the 19th September.
The battle became famous for the first use of the British tanks on a battlefield.
Rifleman Pegrum was wounded in the back by a shell on 19th September 1916 and was eventually returned to the UK where he was treated at the East Leeds War Hospital (renamed St James's Hospital in 1925). He was discharged from the army on April 7th 1917 as no longer physically fit to serve. On August 3rd 1917, he was taken to Lonsdale House at Clapham Park in London which was an annex of the Star and Garter Hospital at Richmond, Surrey. See:
http://ezitis.myzen.co.uk/lonsdale.html
By late 1918 he had moved to War Seal Mansions, Fulham, a purpose built block for disabled veterans and their families, funded by Sir Oswald Stoll. The Foundation was established in 1917 by a group of benefactors, including Sir Jesse Boot and Sir Gordon Selfridge, led by Sir Oswald Stoll, a theatrical impresario and theatre owner. The charity was originally known as the War Seal Foundation. James remained there, although the name of the Mansions was changed to "Sir Oswald Stoll Mansions" in 1937. James died in 1966, aged 80. The Foundation continues to provide accommodation for former service personnel.

Kind regards,
Alan
Reply from: Ann
Date: Tuesday 7th February 2012 at 9:33 AM

Another great help to me
Thank you so much
Kind Regards
Ann
Posted by: Trevor Chamberlain {Email left}
Location: Stannington Northumberlad
Date: Sunday 5th February 2012 at 5:59 PM
Dear Sir
I am having a great deal of difficulty finding information about my grandfather, I have letters from the Paymasters Office regarding a payment to his wife, plus other letters etc.

The information with regard to him, is as follows:
George Henry Chamberlain 6203, 2nd Battalion Kings Own Yorkshire Light Infantry,
Recorded as killed in action on the 15/11/1914, believed while taking a Chateau & Stable outside of Ypres on the Menin Road. Officers mentioned during the days each side of the 15th; 13th/14th Capt Smyth with 50 picked men attacked the Chateau and stables at 7p.m. 2/Lt Boardman with him. 2Lt Grubb was in rear support with one platoon of D. Coy. & remainder of of D. Coy in reserve. Attack was successful in retaking Chateau but Capt. Smyth was missing afterwards. 2nd Lt Boardman wounded & 2/Lt Grubb killed. Others mentioned Capt.Hodgson, 2Lt Corballis.
Regards Trevor George Chamberlain
Reply from: Aln Greveson
Date: Sunday 5th February 2012 at 7:20 PM

Dear Trevor,
An Army medal rolls index card for George Chamberlain recorded he entered France on 11th November 1914. The 2nd Bn KOYLI had been in France since 16th August, so it would appear he was part of a later draft. His medal card showed he was "presumed dead". This meant that he was missing and he would not have been officially accepted as dead until six months afterwards, or more. The CWGC and "Soldiers Died in the Great War" stated his death was on 15th November 1914. His name is commemorated on Panel 47 of the Menin Gate for the missing of Flanders. The CWGC stated he served with "C" Company when he died.
The war diary of the 2nd Battalion recorded that C Company was "North of the Menin Road. C Coy in reserve trenches to right front" on 15th November 1914, the day after the attack on the stables. C Company was commanded by Captain Pyman and 2 Lt Boardman at the time so it is feasible he took part in that attack in which 2 Lt Boardman was wounded. Equally he may have died the following day. As he was listed as missing presumed dead it seems less likely that he was killed while the Company was in reserve trenches. Even during a relief, he would be unlikely to have gone "missing" and his death would have been witnessed in the trenches. It is more likely he did not return from the attack on the stables and was listed as missing at the roll call on the morning of the 15th.
You can download the battalion war diary from the National Archives website for a charge of GBP 3-50. See:

http://www.nationalarchives.gov.uk/documentsonline/details-result.asp?queryType=1&resultcount=1&Edoc_Id=8199325

You would be fortunate to find any specific mention of an individual private soldier, but scroll through the pages beyond November to see if there are any post-battle reports.
George Chamberlain qualified for the 1914 Star with Mons clasp; the British War Medal and the Victory Medal. Local newspapers of the tie may have reported an obituary for him. They would be kept at the local studies library of the town where his parents or wife lived.
Kind regards,
Alan
Reply from: Top Cat
Date: Monday 6th February 2012 at 7:12 PM

Alan
Many thanks for the prompt reply and the information you have given, I will indead carry out the surch you have suggested.
Once again many thanks on behalf of my brother and myself.
Trevor
Posted by: Ann {Email left}
Location: Petts Wood
Date: Sunday 5th February 2012 at 3:37 PM
Hello
Are you able to tell me anything regarding the death of Private Percy William Friend around 16th June 1917. He was in 3/4 Royal West Kent Regiment and died in France.
Thank you
Ann
Reply from: Alan Greveson
Date: Sunday 5th February 2012 at 5:52 PM

Dear Ann,
Percy William Friend 11018 enlisted in the 3/4th Battalion Royal West Kent Regiment on November 12th 1915 and trained in the UK at Canterbury and Ashford until the battalion went overseas, sailing from Southampton on May 31st and arriving at Le Havre on June 1st 1917. The Battalion was attached to the 9th and 34th Divisions until it was assigned to serve with the 17th Division, on June 22nd 1917. Percy was wounded on June 21st 1917 and was reported as being "dangerously wounded" by the 30th Casualty Clearing Station which was based at Aubigny-en-Artois in France. He suffered a gunshot wound to the head and neck and "died of wounds" on 23rd June 1917.
He was buried at Aubigny communal cemetery extension. See:
http://www.cwgc.org/

Kind regards,
Alan
Reply from: Ann
Date: Monday 6th February 2012 at 8:50 AM

Thank you very much that was really helpful.
Kind Regards
Ann
Posted by: Judith {Email left}
Location: Scunthorpe
Date: Sunday 5th February 2012 at 2:17 PM
Hello,

My aunt recently died and left me some old books (she collected them). Amongst them is a service issue bible from The First World War which belonged to WB Potts, Royal Engineer, 26457. I would like to return the bible to the soldier's family.

I have done a bit of detective work online. I know the soldier was called William B Potts from his medal card (from National Archives). It shows that he was a sapper who received the Victory and British medals. His roll is: RE/101B97.

I have looked on the 1911 census, there are three William B Potts, aged 12, 23 and 27. I suppose any of them could be him. One of the entries has 'military' as its status (the 12 year old, who is living with mum and sister, possibly in barracks).

I have lots of experience in researching my family tree, but I have no idea how to find out William B Potts' identity. Could you please share any tips about where I could find out more? If I could just get a middle name, I could find his date of birth, then a marriage, children and grandchildren.

Thank you for your time,
Judith
Reply from: Alan Greveson
Date: Sunday 5th February 2012 at 5:52 PM

Dear Judith,
Unfortunately there is no genealogical information to go with the regimental number of William B. Potts. No individual service record appears to have survived for him, so it is not possible to identify him further.
As there is no age for William Potts, you would have to search births back to about 1864, some fifty years before the war started. You would then have to trace each of those families to the present day, which is not really practicable.
Hopefully, though, some descendant of William may read your post.
Kind regards,
Alan
Reply from: Judith
Date: Sunday 5th February 2012 at 6:56 PM

Dear Alan,

Thanks for your advice. Here's hoping that someone reads this post and gets in touch. I might try posting on a few genealogy sites, too.
I've asked the National Archives to let me know the content of the roll entry RE/101B97 pg 20629. I'm not sure I'll discover anything new, however.

In England and Wales in 1911 there are only four W.B. Potts alive. One is 76, so I discounted him. So, I might have narrowed it down to three possibles. You're right, though, tracing those families to the present day would take an age.

This is maybe one for the school holidays!
Best wishes,
Judith
Posted by: Julie Eden {Email left}
Location: Walsall
Date: Saturday 4th February 2012 at 11:20 PM
Hi Alan,

I have read a post dated June 2011 and I have replied regarding my Grandfather Frank Eden. Somebody else called Lucy inquired about the same family and I am intrigued to know any more information any of you may have about my Grandfather.

Many Thanks,
Julie
Reply from: Alan Greveson
Date: Sunday 5th February 2012 at 2:49 PM

Dear Julie,
I'm afraid I have no further information than was given in the original post. Perhaps Lucy may have more.
Kind regards,
Alan
Reply from: Julie Eden
Date: Sunday 5th February 2012 at 4:44 PM

Dear Alan

Thank you for your reply. Would it be possible to pass my e-mail address on to Lucy as I do not know how I am related to Lucy and her family?

Kind regards
Many thanks
Julie

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