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Alan Greveson's World War 1 Forum (Page 128)

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Posted by: Paddywack {No contact email}
Location: London
Date: Wednesday 5th December 2012 at 6:42 PM
I am researching Lt.Col George Augustus Elliot MC, 2nd Batt Royal Irish Regiment 1914-1923.He received his MC as a Captain and I believe he was made a prisoner of war. He was also present at Windsor during the disbandment of the Royal Irish Regiment. I have not been able to look up his career, his death or any details of the citation for his MC or his time spent as a prisoner of war in Germany. I look forward to any news on the Col.
Best regards,
Reply from: Somme
Date: Saturday 25th April 2015 at 10:16 PM

Hi
Are you a relative of Colonel Elliot?
Have you managed to fins any information about him?
I have some details but I don't want to duplicate what you have

Posted by: Rebecca {Email left}
Location: Bristol
Date: Saturday 1st December 2012 at 6:22 PM
Dear Alan

Is it possible to find out under what circumstances John Wilkinson Moorhouse was injured around 7.8.01 in the Boer War? I know your forum is a WW1 forum, but I just thought you might be able to point me in the right direction, please. He was with the Imperial Yeomanry. Number 20527.

Many thanks.

rebecca
Reply from: Alan Greveson
Date: Saturday 1st December 2012 at 8:38 PM

Dear Rebecca,
You need to establish in which Company of which battalion of the Imperial Yeomanry he served and then establish the wartime history of that Battalion in 1901. You would be very fortunate indeed to establish how an individual was wounded or became unfit through sickness. Most suffered sickness. Any surviving service records would be in WO 97 at the National Archives or available to download (charges apply) from the Findmypast website.
Kind regards,
Alan
Reply from: Rebecca
Date: Sunday 2nd December 2012 at 9:44 AM

Hello Alan,

Many thanks for that information. I do know he was 23rd Company (Duke of lancaster's) 8 Battalion. So I'll go from there.

Are there any records anywhere for the volunteers? In 1891 Harry Moorhouse was in the 1st Volunteer Battalion, KOYLI. He was Captain of C Company. But there seem to be no records that I can locate.

Thanks again for your help as ever,

Best wishes

Rebecca
Reply from: Alan Greveson
Date: Sunday 2nd December 2012 at 5:03 PM

Dear Rebecca,
Surviving records of the Volunteers are very rare. The volunteers were organised on a county basis and any records would be held in local record offices or museums. The National Archives at Kew has some pay lists in WO13/4622-4675 and registers of decorations in WO 330/3-4 and WO 102/21.
When the Territorial Force was created in 1908 the 1st Volunteer Battalion became the 4th Battalion KOYLI. Lieutenant-Colonel Harry Moorhouse DSO of the 4th KOYLI was killed in action on 9th October 1917. As I said in my earlier reply in November last year, his officer's service records are held at the National Archives at Kew in Catalogue item reference WO 374/48639. See
http://www.nationalarchives.gov.uk/records/looking-for-person/officerbritisharmyafter1913.htm

Kind regards,
Alan
Reply from: Rebecca
Date: Sunday 2nd December 2012 at 5:58 PM

Hi Alan
Thank you. I'm sorry to ask you so many questions, but you do seem to know everything.
Best wishes,
Rebecca
Posted by: William Paul Davies {Email left}
Location: Regina Sask Canada
Date: Saturday 1st December 2012 at 3:48 PM
I have been asked by my family about our grandfather William Blair Davies who served during World 1 they think he was with the Duke of Cornwall Light Infantry. We know he was at the Battle of the Somme. We know he was a sapper. His war medals read - 112537 SPR. W.B.DAVIES R.E.
He survived the war and passed away in 1946. Can anyone help? I cannot find any war records about him.
Thank you in advance for any help
Reply from: Alan Greveson
Date: Saturday 1st December 2012 at 8:36 PM

Dear William,
No individual service record has survived for William Blair Davies so it is not possible to state his wartime service. An Army medal rolls index card for William B Davies 112537 Royal Engineers recorded he was a sapper in the Royal Engineers. A sapper was a private solider with trade skills. William Davies enlisted on 14th August 1915 and was sent to France very soon afterwards arriving on 26th August 1915. He was discharged through sickness on 24th December 1917 from the UK-based "3rd Provisional Company RE" which was a holding company that did not serve overseas.
There is no record of which company he served with in France. His award of the 1914-15 Star is recorded on the medal roll RE/4B page 2598. The rolls are held at the National Archives and may state the unit in which William was serving when he arrived in France. By the speed of his enlistment he may have been specially enlisted into one of the tunneling companies.
Kind regards,
Alan
Reply from: William P Davies
Date: Saturday 1st December 2012 at 10:22 PM

Many many thanks the information is tremendously appreciated.

Posted by: Jonboy {Email left}
Location: Harlow Essex
Date: Friday 30th November 2012 at 8:24 PM
Hi Alan
More info from my Grandads Diary (i cant believe he has put so much down on paper on his past Family
i just wished it was easier to read.) So anyway can you look up on a Herbert Nicholls Born 1884 in
Maids Moreton in Buckinghamshire at aged 17 in 1901 he was living at what looks like No 2 Main Street
in Maids Moreton its looks to read he died in mesopotamia ? which tells me he was there with the
Military maybe ? his parents were George Nicholls and Grace Oldmeadow but thats all i can make out on
his Diary.
Many thanks
Jonboy
Reply from: Alan Greveson
Date: Saturday 1st December 2012 at 1:11 PM

Dear Jonboy,
There was a William Herbert Nicholls from Maids Moreton (born July-Sept 1883) who died of sickness on 22nd July 1917 at Baghdad and is buried at Baghdad North Gate War Cemetery. He served with the 1st Battalion the Oxfordshire and Buckinghamshire Light Infantry. He qualified for the British War Medal and the Victory Medal, so he did not serve in a theatre of war until some date after January 1st 1916.
The original 1st Battalion Ox and Bucks LI was captured at Kut al Amara and a provisional battalion was formed early in 1916 from reinforcements at Wadi. On 6th July 1916 the Provisional Battalion became the 1st Battalion and served on the Lines of Communication with the 7th Indian Division in Mesopotamia. Baghdad was captured on March 11th 1917.
Kind regards,
Alan
Reply from: Jonboy
Date: Saturday 1st December 2012 at 2:48 PM

Many thanks for that Alan.
Jonboy
Posted by: Jane {No contact email}
Location: Deeping St James
Date: Friday 30th November 2012 at 8:15 PM
Hi Alan

If I may pick your brains again! My uncle, George Alfred Brittain, served during WWI with the Kings Royal Rifle Corps. It has recently come to light that he was gassed during the period and, indeed, I recall him vividly in the 1950s looking extremely gaunt and thin. In fact, when he eventually passed away, the doctors said it was indeed a miracle that he had survived for so long following the trauma he suffered during WWI. Can you shed any light on what actually may have happened to him at that time.
His number was 31295 and his home address at that time was 29 Clapton Square, London.
With many thanks Alan
Jane
Reply from: Alan Greveson
Date: Saturday 1st December 2012 at 1:10 PM

Dear Jane,
George Brittain enlisted under the Derby scheme which was a last call for men who had so far failed to volunteer to do so before the end of 1915 and before compulsory conscription in 1916. These men put down their names to join the army at the end of 1915 and were sent home the same day being told to await call-up in 1916. George Brittain was called up on 8th August 1916 at the age of 23 and trained with the 5th Battalion the King's Royal Rifle Corps at Sheerness. He was sent to France on 25th November 1916 and posted to the 13th Battalion KRRC. In 1917, the 13th Battalion served with the 111th Infantry Brigade in the 37th Division and fought at The First Battle of the Scarpe; The Second Battle of the Scarpe and The Battle of Arleux. In August 1917 they were at Pilkem Ridge. There is no specific record of his being wounded but George returned to England on 17th August 1917 to the 5th Battalion at Sheerness. On 16th November 1917, George Brittain was transferred to the Rifle Brigade where he served with the 52nd (Graduated) Battalion which was in the training reserve and provided Home Defence in the Colchester area. George was discharged from the army on 28th February 1919. He qualified for the British War Medal and the Victory Medal.
Kind regards,
Alan
Posted by: Vee {Email left}
Location: Worthing West Sussex
Date: Friday 30th November 2012 at 2:02 PM
Dear Alan, My friend Vee is looking for any information about her Grandfather. He is Hubert John Cuckney, born11/3/1895 at Sompting W Sussex. he was a Private in the Machine Gun Corp's, number 104685. Some one has suggested he may have been a POW. Any help would be great . Thank you, sigy
Reply from: Alan Greveson
Date: Friday 30th November 2012 at 11:05 PM

No individual service record has survived for Hubert John Cuckney so it is not possible to suggest his wartime service.
Kind regards,
Alan
Reply from: Vee
Date: Saturday 1st December 2012 at 10:31 AM

Thank you for your help Vee
Posted by: Alexander {No contact email}
Location: Retford
Date: Wednesday 28th November 2012 at 10:16 PM
Hello Alan
Can you please shed some light on a relative of a friend, I have done some work but am now stuck.
His name was John William Hilliar from Somerset, during WW1 he served in the Royal Irish and later in the MGC as a Lt.
He married a Ms Elsie Emery who I am told may have served in the British Red Cross during WW2?
During WW2 john served with the 4th Somerset Home Guard and died in 1942, he is on the CWWG page as Capt Hilliard.
I do not knw whether he died in service? I also would like to know how to find anything about Elsie's time with the Red Cross? The number on the medal I have seen is 33030, Elsies two brothers both died in WW1, you did some excellent research on them for me earlier this year.
When I was trying to find a Hilliard in the Somerset Home Guard, I found a 16 year old lad who was accidently shot, called Albert,on the Yeovil memorial page, was he any relation?
Any help you can give me about John or Elsie would be great.
Many thanks,
Regards.
Alexander.
Reply from: Alan Greveson
Date: Thursday 29th November 2012 at 3:54 PM

Dear Alexander,
Service records for soldiers or officers who served in the First then Second World War are held by the UK Ministry of Defence. The MOD will release certain amounts of information about a deceased person depending on whether you are the direct next-of-kin, or not. You can apply for a search using the different application forms for next-of-kin, or with permission of next-of-kin, or as a general enquirer. See:

http://www.veterans-uk.info/service_records/service_records.html

You will need proof of death (copy of death certificate); the soldier's date of birth or service number; and next-of-kin's signed permission (unless you are the direct next-of-kin), known as form Part 1. You then need a completed form Part 2 (search details), and cheque for payment. The next-of-kin form (Part 1) is for completion by the next-of-kin of deceased service personnel (or enquirers with the consent of next of kin). Look for "Service records publications" under "Related pages" and follow the instructions. Otherwise use a general enquirer's form. The Part 2 form is entitled: "Request forms for service personnel Army" found under "Related Pages". A cheque for GBP 30 should be made payable to "The MOD Accounting Officer" and sent to Army Personnel Centre Secretariat, Disclosures 2, Mail Point 515, Kentigern House, 65, Brown Street, Glasgow G2 8EX Scotland with all the paperwork.
Searches take several months to complete. For Red Cross records see:
http://www.redcross.org.uk/About-us/Who-we-are/Museum-and-archives

Kind regards,
Alan.
Reply from: Alexander
Date: Thursday 29th November 2012 at 4:24 PM

Hello
Many thanks Alan for the contact details, I will pass them on to the relatives and work from there.
Regards.
Alexander.
Posted by: Andy {No contact email}
Location: Cambs
Date: Wednesday 28th November 2012 at 9:11 PM
Hello alan
i have an old ww1 postcard sent to my grandmother it has 1915 on it the senders name is william
but the surname is a bit of a scribble but it looks like paton the service no is 76777 and he is a
pioneer address 31 e--- line section R E it also has BEF at the bottom would you be able to help me
thanks andy
Reply from: Alan Greveson
Date: Thursday 29th November 2012 at 3:49 PM

Dear Andy,
He was certainly William Paton, a private soldier (sapper) No. 76777 of the Royal Engineers. "BEF" was the British Expeditionary Force which generally referred to the BEF in France. No individual service record has survived for William so it is not possible to suggest his wartime service. An Army medal rolls index card showed he entered France with the Royal Engineers as a sapper (qualified tradesman) on 14th September 1915. He qualified for the 1914-15 Star; the British War Medal and the Victory Medal. He was not identified as a war death and therefore survived the war.
The most frequently mentioned "line sections" of the Royal Engineers were the motor air line sections which erected telephone cables (lines) on poles above ground (in the "air" as opposed to underground); dispensed from motor vehicles. They were earlier known as cable sections and had been horse-drawn.
William Paton was later allotted the number WR/251588 as a pioneer (unqualified tradesman) in the Royal Engineers. The WR prefixed numbers were allotted in about March 1918 to men who were posted to the railway and transportation section of the Royal Engineers.
Kind regards,
Alan
Reply from: Andy
Date: Saturday 1st December 2012 at 1:49 PM

Hello Alan
many thanks for the information you sent me regarding my grandmothers ww1 card
from william paton
Kind Regards Andy
Posted by: Jonboy {Email left}
Location: Harlow Essex
Date: Wednesday 28th November 2012 at 5:03 PM
Hi Alan
Can you please see if you can find about a Arthur Nicholls Born 1884 Birmingham. as far as i can make
out he was with the Machine Gun Corps His No was 19582 looking at my Grandads old writing pads (not easy)
it looks like Arthur was orignaly in the Worcs Regiment No :11038 although that could be wrong as its a bit
Faded.My grandad has written down that he died in action.
Many thanks
Jonboy
Reply from: Alan Greveson
Date: Wednesday 28th November 2012 at 6:04 PM

Dear Jonboy,
There is no individual service record for Arthur Nicholls.
Arthur Nicholls first served as a private in the 1st Bn Worcestershire Regiment, 11039. He arrived with the Battalion in France on the night of 5th/6th November 1914. He qualified for the 1914 Star, the British War Medal and the Victory Medal. The 1st Battalion served in the 24th Infantry Brigade in the 8th Division and in 1915 was engaged at The Battle of Neuve Chapelle and The Battle of Aubers. The 8th Division also fought at The action of Bois Grenier (a diversionary attack alongside the Battle of Loos).
Arthur eventually served as a lance-corporal in the Machine Gun Corps, 19582. The Machine Gun Corps was created on 22 October 1915 from gun companies formed in each infantry brigade. These companies transferred to the new Corps serving as infantry machine gun companies. It is not recorded in which company of the MGC Arthur served.
However, the 24th Infantry Brigade, including the 1st Bn Worcestershire Regiment, moved to the 23rd Division on 18th October 1915. When he was killed on 11th March 1916 Arthur was buried at Cabaret-Rouge British Cemetery at Souchez, North of Arras. On that date the 23rd Division was engaged at Souchez after they had relieved the French Army the area around Carency. The front was between the Boyau de l'Ersatz and the Souchez River. The artillery was in the area Carency - Ablain St Nazaire - Bois de Bouvigny, an exposed position in which it was subject to severe shelling. They remained there until mid-April 1916.

It seems possible therefore that Arthur moved to the MGC early in 1916 and may have served with them in the 23rd Division alongside the 1st Battalion Worcestershire Regiment.
Kind regards,
Alan
Reply from: Jonboy
Date: Wednesday 28th November 2012 at 6:16 PM

Many thanks Alan
There are lots of info in my Grandads Diary regarding the Nicholls Family its just a case of trying to read
them as the pages are very worn and are taking a long time to understand but i will get there,mind you
there are something like 57 pages Phew !
Kind Regards
Jonboy
Posted by: Leyther1 {Email left}
Location: Leigh
Date: Wednesday 28th November 2012 at 1:43 PM
Dear Alan
You have helped me a couple of times recently and I have been extremely grateful and made sure I have donated to the Legion :) ...would you be able to help me again please?

I have located the records of William David Dorricott, b. 1833 Shropshire on Ancestry (his records show twice and both records have some different info in there). His number looks like RTS2100. I have tried to trace his "story" during WW1 but as I have zero knowledge, would you be able to explain his movements in better detail like you have with some previous anscestors of mine please? The way you have done it in the past for me has been brilliant and I have understood the action / campaigns / medals - even times at home inbetween, much much easier. I thought I could see that he stayed with the army after the war? I can see you have a few enquiries on the go at the moment, so appreciate you have limited time, but if you could spare any time to have a look at this records for me it would be great.

Thanks in advance
Leyther1
Reply from: Alan Greveson
Date: Wednesday 28th November 2012 at 5:10 PM

Dear Leyther,
William David Dorricott was especially enlisted into the Army Service Corps because of his skill with horses. In the 1911 census he was recorded as a stableman in the domestic service of Eaton Hall, Cheshire, home of the Duke of Westminster. He lived at the stables at the Hall. He married in 1913 and at the outbreak of war, employed as a stud-groom, he enlisted in the Army Service Corps on 21st September 1914 in London where he joined the ASC Remount Service for the duration of the war. He was aged 31; 5ft 5ins tall; had a pale complexion; blue eyes and greyish hair. His enlistment was approved at Woolwich on September 23rd 1914. Woolwich had been the traditional home of the Remount Service in England since 1891. The Remount Service provided and trained horses and mules for the Army. In September 1914, the No 2 Base Remount Depot was established at Rouen to supply remounts for the British Expeditionary Force and William was appointed a foreman Corporal there, arriving on September 24th 1914. The depot's horses arrived two days later. The brief time between his enlistment and arrival in France indicates the nature of his special enlistment as did his regimental number RTS 2100 where the RTS stood for Remount Transport Specials. He was undertaking his skilled civilian job in uniform on active service, although he was technically serving in a non-combatant arm of the service. He was promoted to acting-Sergeant on 23rd October 1914 and to Sergeant on 6 December 1914. He remained at Rouen with No 2 Base Remount Depot (2/BRD ASC) until 7th April 1916. He had been granted leave between 28th September and 6th October 1915. On April 4th 1916 he was admitted to No 2 General Hospital, which was at Le Havre as "NYD" which stood for Not Yet Diagnosed on admission, but which the soldiers said stood for "Not Yet Dead". He was suffering from arteriosclerosis (hardening of the arteries) and was transferred to the UK on 15th April 1916 on the Hospital Ship "Western Australia". He was treated at Perth, Scotland, at the city infirmary and the Rosebank Auxiliary Hospital, Perth, between 17th April and 22nd May 1916. He was passed fit for light duties and overseas duties within three months. On July 1st 1916 he returned to France aboard SS "Courtfield" sailing from Southampton to Le Havre and re-joined the No 2 BRD at Rouen. On 15th September 1916 he was admitted to hospital in France and re-joined his unit on 1st October 1916. He was then returned to England on 5th October 1916 aboard SS "Princess Alexandria" via Southampton. On October 6th 1916, he was posted to the Remount Depot at Ormskirk in Lancashire. This would have been in the grounds of Lathom Park, a stately home near Ormskirk. See:
http://lbmhs.co.uk/remount-history

His return to the UK may have been through ill-health although it is more likely his skills were required at Lathom Park which also handled the importation of horses from Ireland, Canada and America. William remained at Ormskirk until he was discharged from the Army at the Prees Heath dispersal centre on July 10th 1919. William qualified for the 1914 Star, the British War Medal and the Victory Medal.
Kind regards,
Alan
Reply from: Leyther
Date: Wednesday 28th November 2012 at 7:09 PM

Hello Alan
Great work again, and quick! really pleased with this information, as always, you have made it very easy for me to understand. THANK YOU very much for this. Much appreciated and will certainly help with further family research.

Best regards
Leyther1

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